Landscaping sector to rally in St. John's

Everton McLean
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Economy Water ban having 'profound effect' on industry: executive director

Members of the landscaping industry will rally at St. John's City Hall Tuesday to bring attention to difficulties in the $75-million industry brought on by the metro-area water ban.

Landscape Newfoundland and Labrador (LNL) executive director Cle Newhook said with fewer people planting vegetation and developing landscapes out of fear the plants will shrivel, landscaping companies have been forced to lay off workers as contracts dry up.

Members of the landscaping industry will rally at St. John's City Hall Tuesday to bring attention to difficulties in the $75-million industry brought on by the metro-area water ban.

Landscape Newfoundland and Labrador (LNL) executive director Cle Newhook said with fewer people planting vegetation and developing landscapes out of fear the plants will shrivel, landscaping companies have been forced to lay off workers as contracts dry up.

The water ban, put in place July 9, due to low water supply levels, forbids people from using outdoor hoses on plants or established lawns.

"The whole of the industry is really suffering. People have stopped buying plants because they don't want to put them in because they'll die," said Newhook.

"We recognize that, yeah, there is a problem, but it's also a problem that is not a new problem. Part of our rally is to raise the profile on the whole issue and press for solutions."

The organization is suggesting that watering be allowed for new landscape installations; residents be allowed to use watering cans to keep plants moist; and LNL be given a seat on the water authority. It's also asking for access to bodies of water not already on the supply system.

The group of several landscaping firms in St. John's will form a truck convoy that will go through the streets of St. John's Tuesday, stopping at City Hall at 10:30 a.m.

"The rally itself we're calling green for life. We're not beating anybody up. We're basically trying to raise the profile of the industry and the value of water generally," he said.

"A lot of companies now are talking to their employees about potential layoffs. A lot of the contracts they had are being lost. Contracts are being postponed into the fall. The impact on the whole industry is pretty profound."

He said the group is also going to present the city with a tree, along with signs that explain the benefits of plant life.

emclean@thetelegram.com

Organizations: St. John's City

Geographic location: St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

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Recent comments

  • don
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    It appears that Landscape Newfoundland and Labrador is asking for additional bodies of water to be connected to the St. John's municipal water supply system. There may be problems associated with that plan. Certainly, cost will be a factor, adding more ponds to the system will be expensive. Watershed protection will require the freezing of thousands of acres of land and much of the land may be privately owned. Even if some of the land is City or Crown owned, it will not be available for development in the future. Will the City of St. John's or the Government compensate the land owners for the loss of use, enjoyment and future economic opportunities which will be lost when the land is placed in a watershed protection zone? Watershed protection usually prohibits development of any kind? In this Province it is not unusual for Government to punish one group of citizens in order to appease or benefit another group. I think that land owners in the area should watch carefully what these folks are up to. I suspect that the Landscapers have connected with Government already to lobby for expanded watershed land freezes and increased water supplies from additional ponds in the area to ensure that the grass gets sprinkled! The result might be that many land owners will not be able to farm, sell, develop, or build anything on their land. Compensation, if any, for affected land owners will be minimal. Others with vested business interests will benefit from the land owners loss. Government here usually acts without thinking about adverse consequences. Who will pay for an expanded water supply system? The Landscapers? The land owners? The tax payers? If we follow the logic of the Landscapers, we may as well freeze all the land and connect every pond on the Northeast Avalon and be done with it!!!!

  • Hmmmm I wonder
    July 02, 2010 - 13:27

    As I was driving home from work on Friday July 18 at 5:30am I seen a crew in a red pickup truck watering the City's Flowers. The flowers that are on the poles in front of City Hall. It seems odd that with a water ban in effect that those flowers are allowed to be watered...

  • William
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    In water shortage, and the sodbusters are using/tying it into a work/jobloss issue(coverer up to loss in revenue), sorry to the people who lose their job, but guess what, my water shortage to drink is more important than your shortage for the your grass to grow. wtf.. prioities people

  • Taxpayer
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    The city has posted the Regional Water Supply Study in it's entirety on it's web site. It makes for some very interesting reading. 14 communities now draw from Bay Bulls Big Pond, as well as a Newfounland Power generating station. They also closed an entire water shed(Petty Hr. Long Pond) in 2002. So the brain trust at city closes down supply, while adding thousands of new homes,and then tries to con us in to thinking that it is all do to with the weather. Sure we have some dryer years than others,but is shutting down all use of water really the answer?Again, why here and no where else. Like a friend who recently moved back from the mainland said nothing says POVERTY like not having water.

  • W
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Prec. avg. Calgary - 399mm............SJ - 1482.............CAL Pop over 1 Mil, SJ regional approx 250,000.

  • harry
    July 02, 2010 - 13:21

    wait till fall to put in new lawns then we will have to hire ore workers to make up for lost time more work more mney more happy faces geez its not dooms day if holiday time in newfie enjoy the nice weather n stop omplaining , there will be plenty of water ant lots of jobs soonnnnnnnnn grow up ffs ,,,,

  • mainlander
    July 02, 2010 - 13:20

    Taxpayer sums up the problem - you don't here of low water levels at Windsor Lake because it isn't being used.

  • unknown
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    I have to laugh about the So Called
    Water Ban.
    IF you want to save on water, Get the
    School Boards to Stop the
    Automatic Flushing of Urnas in Every
    School in St. John's and areas. Then you
    will save on WATER. The Automatic
    Flushing of Urnals, with no students
    from June to September. Just Calculate Every 3 Minutes it takes 3 LITRES OF WATER PER FLUSH per urnal. How Many Urnals in each School, or SHopping Mall and Public Washrooms. You talk about A BAN ON WATER, Hu.

  • Jack
    July 02, 2010 - 13:14

    If St. John's wants to truly solve its water wores, the city has to stop sharing water with other communities and have these communities get their own water sources.

    In other words, Mount Pearl, Conception Bay South, Bay Bulls, Torbay, Topsail, Portugal Cove-St. Phillips, and St. John's, should use their own water instead of sharing it. That is effective water management.

    Another solution is to force St. John's to get auxillary water sources to protect themselves from future water shortages.

    Halifax Regional Municipality currently uses multiple water sources to help maintain their supply such as Long Lake, Pockwock Lake, and Loon Lake.

    If it works for Halifax, it can work for St. John's.

  • gordon
    July 02, 2010 - 13:13

    its nearly humorous that the seeding of my lawn had to be postponed until the water ban is lifted while down the street Irving offers a $2.00 car wash special on Tuesdays!

    I would have no problem letting commercial vehicles access car washes and deny private vehicles while watering be allowed for new landscape installations and residents be allowed to use watering cans to keep plants moist.

    Gordon

  • don
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    It appears that Landscape Newfoundland and Labrador is asking for additional bodies of water to be connected to the St. John's municipal water supply system. There may be problems associated with that plan. Certainly, cost will be a factor, adding more ponds to the system will be expensive. Watershed protection will require the freezing of thousands of acres of land and much of the land may be privately owned. Even if some of the land is City or Crown owned, it will not be available for development in the future. Will the City of St. John's or the Government compensate the land owners for the loss of use, enjoyment and future economic opportunities which will be lost when the land is placed in a watershed protection zone? Watershed protection usually prohibits development of any kind? In this Province it is not unusual for Government to punish one group of citizens in order to appease or benefit another group. I think that land owners in the area should watch carefully what these folks are up to. I suspect that the Landscapers have connected with Government already to lobby for expanded watershed land freezes and increased water supplies from additional ponds in the area to ensure that the grass gets sprinkled! The result might be that many land owners will not be able to farm, sell, develop, or build anything on their land. Compensation, if any, for affected land owners will be minimal. Others with vested business interests will benefit from the land owners loss. Government here usually acts without thinking about adverse consequences. Who will pay for an expanded water supply system? The Landscapers? The land owners? The tax payers? If we follow the logic of the Landscapers, we may as well freeze all the land and connect every pond on the Northeast Avalon and be done with it!!!!

  • Hmmmm I wonder
    July 01, 2010 - 20:15

    As I was driving home from work on Friday July 18 at 5:30am I seen a crew in a red pickup truck watering the City's Flowers. The flowers that are on the poles in front of City Hall. It seems odd that with a water ban in effect that those flowers are allowed to be watered...

  • William
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    In water shortage, and the sodbusters are using/tying it into a work/jobloss issue(coverer up to loss in revenue), sorry to the people who lose their job, but guess what, my water shortage to drink is more important than your shortage for the your grass to grow. wtf.. prioities people

  • Taxpayer
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    The city has posted the Regional Water Supply Study in it's entirety on it's web site. It makes for some very interesting reading. 14 communities now draw from Bay Bulls Big Pond, as well as a Newfounland Power generating station. They also closed an entire water shed(Petty Hr. Long Pond) in 2002. So the brain trust at city closes down supply, while adding thousands of new homes,and then tries to con us in to thinking that it is all do to with the weather. Sure we have some dryer years than others,but is shutting down all use of water really the answer?Again, why here and no where else. Like a friend who recently moved back from the mainland said nothing says POVERTY like not having water.

  • W
    July 01, 2010 - 20:06

    Prec. avg. Calgary - 399mm............SJ - 1482.............CAL Pop over 1 Mil, SJ regional approx 250,000.

  • harry
    July 01, 2010 - 20:05

    wait till fall to put in new lawns then we will have to hire ore workers to make up for lost time more work more mney more happy faces geez its not dooms day if holiday time in newfie enjoy the nice weather n stop omplaining , there will be plenty of water ant lots of jobs soonnnnnnnnn grow up ffs ,,,,

  • mainlander
    July 01, 2010 - 20:02

    Taxpayer sums up the problem - you don't here of low water levels at Windsor Lake because it isn't being used.

  • unknown
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    I have to laugh about the So Called
    Water Ban.
    IF you want to save on water, Get the
    School Boards to Stop the
    Automatic Flushing of Urnas in Every
    School in St. John's and areas. Then you
    will save on WATER. The Automatic
    Flushing of Urnals, with no students
    from June to September. Just Calculate Every 3 Minutes it takes 3 LITRES OF WATER PER FLUSH per urnal. How Many Urnals in each School, or SHopping Mall and Public Washrooms. You talk about A BAN ON WATER, Hu.

  • Jack
    July 01, 2010 - 19:52

    If St. John's wants to truly solve its water wores, the city has to stop sharing water with other communities and have these communities get their own water sources.

    In other words, Mount Pearl, Conception Bay South, Bay Bulls, Torbay, Topsail, Portugal Cove-St. Phillips, and St. John's, should use their own water instead of sharing it. That is effective water management.

    Another solution is to force St. John's to get auxillary water sources to protect themselves from future water shortages.

    Halifax Regional Municipality currently uses multiple water sources to help maintain their supply such as Long Lake, Pockwock Lake, and Loon Lake.

    If it works for Halifax, it can work for St. John's.

  • gordon
    July 01, 2010 - 19:50

    its nearly humorous that the seeding of my lawn had to be postponed until the water ban is lifted while down the street Irving offers a $2.00 car wash special on Tuesdays!

    I would have no problem letting commercial vehicles access car washes and deny private vehicles while watering be allowed for new landscape installations and residents be allowed to use watering cans to keep plants moist.

    Gordon