City's water still going out to sea

Everton McLean
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Unmetered water sold to ships necessary for operation of port: St. John's officials

At a time when people aren't allowed to water their lawns or plants because of an outdoor water ban, the City of St. John's is selling water to ships which come into port without metering the volumes.

The city provides water to ships that dock between Prescott Street and The Keg, hooking vessels that ask for service up to a hydrant. Vessels are charged $180 for the first four hours they're hooked up. Every hour thereafter costs $75.

At a time when people aren't allowed to water their lawns or plants because of an outdoor water ban, the City of St. John's is selling water to ships which come into port without metering the volumes.

The city provides water to ships that dock between Prescott Street and The Keg, hooking vessels that ask for service up to a hydrant. Vessels are charged $180 for the first four hours they're hooked up. Every hour thereafter costs $75.

Brendan O'Connell, director of environmental services, said the city has no way of knowing exactly how much water is pumped onto the ships - they simply charge by time, not volume.

"We don't actually know exactly what's (put) out there," he said "It's not that much."

He said in 2008, 88 ships availed of the service, and the revenue was $45,030.

About $22,350 in revenue has been generated so far this year, said O'Connell. He said the price paid by ships has been calculated to cover the value of the water and the cost of paying workers to provide the service.

See SOLD, page A2

While the region is working hard to curb water use as reserves continue to fall during this dry summer, Mayor Dennis O'Keefe said not offering the service to incoming vessels would be disastrous for the operation of the port.

"The harbour is a commercial industrial harbour. When ships come in they need to take on drinking water, and of course they do take on drinking water and not to allow them to take on drinking water would of course be tantamount to closing down the operation of the port," he said. "That's something we wouldn't want to even think about, really, because it would cause irreparable damage, I think, to the port and the province."

Ron Ellsworth, deputy mayor of St. John's and chairman of the regional water services committee, agreed with O'Keefe, saying that whether the water is metered or not, it still has to go out to keep the port viable.

"Either an hourly rate or metered, it would still go out," he said. "Obviously we have a working port. We have an industrial piece that's going on at the port and we have a commercial piece with ships coming in bringing freight and leaving, so it's an active, viable port and they need access to water also."

Meanwhile, O'Connell said there is an agreement in place with the port authority that will see the service handed over to that agency by June 2011. He said the city plans to install water meters to monitor how much water is sold to the authority, and the authority in turn will resell it to the vessels.

emclean@thetelegram.com

Geographic location: St. John's, Prescott Street

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  • tom
    July 02, 2010 - 13:35

    beauracy at its best. the city will sell this water at the price it is getting now certainly not for less but it will be to the port authority. the port authority will put a mark up on and sell it for more then pat it self on the back at year end review and say how revenue has increased for the port.costs go up for the vessels and pass it on to their customers who pass it on to the consumers.and we wonder why everthing is getting so expensive.the councillors of stjohns really do need the raise they want!!!

  • cornergirl
    July 02, 2010 - 13:35

    I wonder when the rate was set?

  • Dave
    July 02, 2010 - 13:31

    Telling it like it is, in your next travels you could go to BC or California or many other parts where they have had to institute water bans. Get our more, or read the newspaper.

  • Paul
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    Do we really have to wait until 2011 for a proper accounting of water water we are selling? This is rather different than for residents of the city. Fresh water is quite expensive. I wonder how many other ports around the world just estimate how much water they sell?

  • Robert
    July 02, 2010 - 13:27

    COME ON! Ellsworth says put your landscape jobs on hold with no idea of when the ban will be over. You're shutting down an industry with no concern for their employees. By I went by a car wash on Saturday and there was a waiting time of about 45 minutes. Great job municipal leaders!

  • Bones II
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    I wonder if this annoys many people when they learn this? It seems like an awful lot of cold hard cash for clean water. So much, it makes me wonder why the city hasn't tied a half-dozen more waterways into the city supply to make sure they don't run out.

    This could almost be considered a major component of our future resource pool. In our lifetimes, we will see the value of clean water rise dramatically. It'd be nice to have a few pallets for sale. Maybe, by then, they'll need to buy our oil and gas too just to get their water home, lol.

  • Lost at sea
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    St Johns has the cheapest water for a port almost anywhere in the world. going rate in Galveston Texas is $125/ton with $150 hook up fee.

  • Tom
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    Something I learned this weekend from a council worker was that there is an adjacent water supply next to Bay Bulls Big Pond called Beaver Pond that could be utilized but the brain drain at city hall are allowing the dam on this pond to be left open and the water to just run off. This council had better pray for lots of snow , because at this point rain will not cut it. If we do not get a substantial amount of snow this winter then we will be in really big trouble next year. According to councils plans they will not have Petty Hr Long Pond on stream until 2011. What is wrong with tapping into Middle Pond and using the existing chlorination at Bay Bulls Big Pond ?All you would need are some excavators and a pumping system to feed the water into the existing Bay Bulls Big Pond. Its time for this council to be more proactive. Ponds like Soldiers Pond on the TCH could be sourced for CBS, but it would require a chlorination sysytem but large tanks could be used for this. Time to get creative there Dennis, Ron I'm a bit surprised that you havent taken more initiative on this. Approach the Feds for emmergency funds this is becoming a potentially dangerous situation. St. Johns has burned in the past and this could happen again.!!

  • Angela
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    What size are these hoses, garden hose size? Or more like firetruck hoses ? For 4-6-8 hours ? How many liters is that?

  • Dave
    July 02, 2010 - 13:24

    Note to Messrs O'Keefe and Ellsworth: I don't think anyone is suggesting NOT providing water to ships. Talk about over-reacting.

    I think the point being made is that it's somewhat irresponsible of the city to not know how much is being pumped out and whether or not the city is getting appropriate value for it.

  • Tom
    July 02, 2010 - 13:24

    To Tom, the city has already drained Middle Pond into Big Pond by opening the dam with heavy equipment. Beaver Pond is connected also, it is more of a gully / marsh than anything. But they have drained it inot Big Pond.

  • dk
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Having a water ban on gardens is like shooting yourself in the foot. In this age of global warming don't folks know the importance of plants and trees?? They help keep our life cycle going, let them die and so do we. Having a garden not only looks nice but it helps the environment. Washing your car, or the outside of your house, however does not. Anyone with a clean car should get a ticket, not only is it a waste of water but is putting all those nasty chemicals in the earth. What is wrong with people, it's simple, think responsibly about your actions before doing anything that can harm other life, trees, plants, animals or humans.

  • P
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    What's better than this is something that I stumbled upon this weekend; Go up the alley on Water St. next to Johnny Ruth and what you will find in the back is what appears to be old city water line exposed through the bank wall behind Basho on Duckworth continuously leaking water 24/7. I'd love to know how many more of these are around. What a lot of people have to realize is that our city council is laughable the majority of the time.

  • Paul
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Tom. Unless there have been physical changes made to the system, Beaver Pond, a small pond, drains into Big Pond anyway, as does Middle Pond. You could deepen the channel from Middle to drain that one more deeply, but it's all running that way now anyway. Wonder how deep Middle Pond is anyway. May not be of any use.

  • Jason
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    What about the city still watering their flowers on Harbour Drive? I just noticed a truck with at least 500l of water in it, doing the daily rounds. And I'm not allowed to water my brown grass, go figure.

  • David
    July 02, 2010 - 13:21

    Why don't all the arm chair Water Engineers out there take some time to read of the St. John's Regional Water Study. Take some time to inform yourselves before posting idiotic ideas and comments.

    http://www.stjohns.ca/cityhall/pdfs/St.%20John's%20Regional%20Water%20Supply%20Update%20to%201994%20Report.pdf

  • Stan
    July 02, 2010 - 13:20

    I NEED MY POOL FILED WITH SOMETHING TO KEEP THE ROACHES OUT

  • Taxpayer
    July 02, 2010 - 13:20

    Just one more example of the contempt those at city hall have for the average taxpayer. We pay for this service, and the infrastructure, but what do we get? Ugly brown lawns, ten bucks to get the car washed,showering with buckets. I feel like I'm living in a third world country!
    As for water going to the sea, two years ago we were experiencing yellow brown water on our street. The city came in and opened up a hydrant, they let it run full bore for days and days. The guy said we don't use enough water on our street, flow too slow, so they will be installing an underground valve that keeps the flow high by pouring water into the storm drain. I wonder how many more of these are out there?Talk about waste!

  • Matt
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    Nasty Nate: I question whether drinking water is a luxury, whether provided to foreigners or not (and I also wonder how many of these boats are ported in St. John's as part of the locally owned fishing fleet - they may not all be foreigners at all). I also find it ridiculous to suggest we're hurting because we can't water lawns. We have all the water we need. We may lack the water we *want* (there's a huge difference between needs and wants, you know), but nobody's turning on dry taps here. We're not suffering a real emergency water shortage. Fires are being fought, showers are available, cooking isn't a problem, drinking water safely and reliably flows. Let's not get hysterical about our current situation. Frustrating? Sure. Emergency? Get your priorities straight.

    Shutting off fresh water supply - which is sold, not given - to ships would limit the port's utility. To suggest such an over-reaction is laughable.

    Finally, don't forget, you don't need a meter to know the maximum flow for the purposes of billing a ship. The city knows the pressure on the line (it's going to constant) and they know the diameter of the line feeding it. They know the GPM (gallons per minute) that the water flows. From that, you can easily establish a rate based on probable demand. Water meters are only needed when nobody knows how often the water is started/stopped (for example, in your residence, unless you want a city employee sitting around with a stop watch each time you turn on a tap - no thanks, I'll take the meter).

    This is a non-story designed to whip up false outrage from the usual know-nothings. Hey look at all the posts! It worked!

  • Monty to Jason
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    Well, Jason. If the City is following their own rules, they should be using recycled water for their flowers and gardens. I guess that means they've drained off all the councillors' swimming pools perhaps?

  • Telling it like it is
    July 02, 2010 - 13:18

    This water ban is getting ridiculous. I mean, I've seen the Great Pyramids of Giza, Stonehenge, The Eiffel Tower, The Great Wall of China, Angel Falls, The Taj Mahal, The Colosseum, Mount Fuji, The River Nile, The Parthenon, and I've also flown FIRST CLASS to every major airport on the planet and I've never seen or heard tell of such a thing as a water ban. This is madness.......



    ......And ohh yeah, I was the first person to walk on the moon and the first person to scale Mount Everest...and I did it at the same time.

  • Einstein
    July 02, 2010 - 13:18

    This province is heading down the crapper faster than the economy is recovering.

    I'm glad my Electrical Engineering degree will offer me a long laster, successful and plentiful career.

    To those will be remaining on this crap, I mean Rock...good luck!

  • Neighboring
    July 02, 2010 - 13:18

    I don't get it. I agree you can see the edges of the lake. Do they really think its going to be drained dry? Its like it year after year, after year, etc...

    We live in NF where it rains every other day except for a week or two during the summer. So, the red flags are raised and people can't water lawns, flowers, wash cars all things that are apart of summer. Go figure

  • Paul
    July 02, 2010 - 13:17

    DK is thinking right. Haven't washed my truck ever. That being said we haven't watered our lawn all year and she's still pretty green. Make sure you leave it long when cutting for one. Beyond that I can't really see the preoccupation with solid grass lawns. They are boring. Rather some wild flowers, interesting bushes and trees. Grass lawns just give you something to do, cut them, weed them, fertilize them. Unless you are practicing soccer they aren't much use, especial out front where no one ever hangs around. But back to the water for boats I can't understand the two-tiered price of the water. Isn't the 4th hour water just as valuable as the first?? Although ports should like to provide water there is a place and time when that is not possible. I'm sure that other major ports in dry countries don't have water to spare and that boats understand that fact and get water where they can. Also water in some places will be more expensive so they will get it where it costs less as well. We may as well make sure we get sensible value for our water if we are going to sell it.

  • Amy
    July 02, 2010 - 13:16

    Can anyone tell me how developers keeps get the ok to put up these subdivisions when every summer St. John's is in a water crisis... where is the water coming for these new houses/communities. They haven't even sussed out resources to accomodate the current residents. Don't get people started on sewage... but shouldn't at least the water issue be considered first. Where is the planning???? Don't we have some engineers who are considering this issue?

  • watering the narrows
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    NOW.. I was walking to the Fort Amherst lighthouse yesterday and heard water running over the rocks below a guardrail. Thinking it was run off from the southside hills I thought no more of it. Upon further investigation I noticed a 4 inch maybe larger city water main pumping gallons of water into the narrows. WHY??? I asked a local and he said it's been running like this for close on 3 years 24/7. I guess Paul Mackey or Art Cheeseman should be sent a watering fine.

  • Earl
    July 02, 2010 - 13:11

    A few weeks ago I noticed something else that needs the City's attention: Ships allowed to use leaky hoses to hook up to the water supply. I went for a walk along the waterfront that day and noticed no less than four hoses with miniature fountains spraying water onto the ground, only to be evaporated by the hot sun. Water being sprayed onto the ground 24/7 is not good for the water supply!

  • b
    July 02, 2010 - 13:10

    What an interesting FYI on the water supplied to ships by the City.

    Anybody want to bet that Okeefe offers water free to the cruise ships...wink wink nudge nude.

    Been on any cruises lately Dennis?

  • Stan
    July 02, 2010 - 13:10

    why the %^&( would anyone care about green lawns? now, not being able to swim in a personal pool is third worldish

  • Joe
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    WHAT??? WE, the people who pay the taxes here have to conserve, yet ships that are coming and going into other ports can have the water?
    When I developed my yard the city hit me with a tax increase because my property was worth more. Now the whole yard is dying, grass, flowers, the whole lot. Can I get a tax credit??? Come on Landscapers, take this and run with it! For a couple of hundred dollars, a ship can fill up? Where's Dennis O'keefe? Ohhhh, he's standing next to the ship taking full advantage of the photo opportunity! Lovely! What a bunch of idiots! We have had water bans in the past, it's not unheard of. The Councillors knew it was coming again, why haven't they planned ahead and pumped water from elsewhere? On Google Maps, Paddy's Pond and Thomas Pond look even closer than Big Pond which is running out. Where's the planning? We're in Newfoundland, we can't go for a walk without having to step around a pond for God's sake!

  • Nasty Nate
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    these ships can get water from other ports. it makes no sense to offer this luxury to foreigners when our own people hurt. the city of st johns just cant pull into somebody elses port and fuel up with unmetered water. these ships will still come to sell there goods and make big piles of money but they should carry enough water from their last port of call and use it wisely.

    put out a special marine notice on noaa and state that the residents of the city of st johns are suffering from an emergency water shortage and emergency ban and that no water is supplied at this port.

    only a third world country can argue with this

  • tom
    July 01, 2010 - 20:25

    beauracy at its best. the city will sell this water at the price it is getting now certainly not for less but it will be to the port authority. the port authority will put a mark up on and sell it for more then pat it self on the back at year end review and say how revenue has increased for the port.costs go up for the vessels and pass it on to their customers who pass it on to the consumers.and we wonder why everthing is getting so expensive.the councillors of stjohns really do need the raise they want!!!

  • cornergirl
    July 01, 2010 - 20:25

    I wonder when the rate was set?

  • Dave
    July 01, 2010 - 20:20

    Telling it like it is, in your next travels you could go to BC or California or many other parts where they have had to institute water bans. Get our more, or read the newspaper.

  • Paul
    July 01, 2010 - 20:18

    Do we really have to wait until 2011 for a proper accounting of water water we are selling? This is rather different than for residents of the city. Fresh water is quite expensive. I wonder how many other ports around the world just estimate how much water they sell?

  • Robert
    July 01, 2010 - 20:14

    COME ON! Ellsworth says put your landscape jobs on hold with no idea of when the ban will be over. You're shutting down an industry with no concern for their employees. By I went by a car wash on Saturday and there was a waiting time of about 45 minutes. Great job municipal leaders!

  • Bones II
    July 01, 2010 - 20:13

    I wonder if this annoys many people when they learn this? It seems like an awful lot of cold hard cash for clean water. So much, it makes me wonder why the city hasn't tied a half-dozen more waterways into the city supply to make sure they don't run out.

    This could almost be considered a major component of our future resource pool. In our lifetimes, we will see the value of clean water rise dramatically. It'd be nice to have a few pallets for sale. Maybe, by then, they'll need to buy our oil and gas too just to get their water home, lol.

  • Lost at sea
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    St Johns has the cheapest water for a port almost anywhere in the world. going rate in Galveston Texas is $125/ton with $150 hook up fee.

  • Tom
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    Something I learned this weekend from a council worker was that there is an adjacent water supply next to Bay Bulls Big Pond called Beaver Pond that could be utilized but the brain drain at city hall are allowing the dam on this pond to be left open and the water to just run off. This council had better pray for lots of snow , because at this point rain will not cut it. If we do not get a substantial amount of snow this winter then we will be in really big trouble next year. According to councils plans they will not have Petty Hr Long Pond on stream until 2011. What is wrong with tapping into Middle Pond and using the existing chlorination at Bay Bulls Big Pond ?All you would need are some excavators and a pumping system to feed the water into the existing Bay Bulls Big Pond. Its time for this council to be more proactive. Ponds like Soldiers Pond on the TCH could be sourced for CBS, but it would require a chlorination sysytem but large tanks could be used for this. Time to get creative there Dennis, Ron I'm a bit surprised that you havent taken more initiative on this. Approach the Feds for emmergency funds this is becoming a potentially dangerous situation. St. Johns has burned in the past and this could happen again.!!

  • Angela
    July 01, 2010 - 20:11

    What size are these hoses, garden hose size? Or more like firetruck hoses ? For 4-6-8 hours ? How many liters is that?

  • Dave
    July 01, 2010 - 20:10

    Note to Messrs O'Keefe and Ellsworth: I don't think anyone is suggesting NOT providing water to ships. Talk about over-reacting.

    I think the point being made is that it's somewhat irresponsible of the city to not know how much is being pumped out and whether or not the city is getting appropriate value for it.

  • Tom
    July 01, 2010 - 20:09

    To Tom, the city has already drained Middle Pond into Big Pond by opening the dam with heavy equipment. Beaver Pond is connected also, it is more of a gully / marsh than anything. But they have drained it inot Big Pond.

  • P
    July 01, 2010 - 20:07

    What's better than this is something that I stumbled upon this weekend; Go up the alley on Water St. next to Johnny Ruth and what you will find in the back is what appears to be old city water line exposed through the bank wall behind Basho on Duckworth continuously leaking water 24/7. I'd love to know how many more of these are around. What a lot of people have to realize is that our city council is laughable the majority of the time.

  • dk
    July 01, 2010 - 20:07

    Having a water ban on gardens is like shooting yourself in the foot. In this age of global warming don't folks know the importance of plants and trees?? They help keep our life cycle going, let them die and so do we. Having a garden not only looks nice but it helps the environment. Washing your car, or the outside of your house, however does not. Anyone with a clean car should get a ticket, not only is it a waste of water but is putting all those nasty chemicals in the earth. What is wrong with people, it's simple, think responsibly about your actions before doing anything that can harm other life, trees, plants, animals or humans.

  • Paul
    July 01, 2010 - 20:07

    Tom. Unless there have been physical changes made to the system, Beaver Pond, a small pond, drains into Big Pond anyway, as does Middle Pond. You could deepen the channel from Middle to drain that one more deeply, but it's all running that way now anyway. Wonder how deep Middle Pond is anyway. May not be of any use.

  • Jason
    July 01, 2010 - 20:06

    What about the city still watering their flowers on Harbour Drive? I just noticed a truck with at least 500l of water in it, doing the daily rounds. And I'm not allowed to water my brown grass, go figure.

  • David
    July 01, 2010 - 20:04

    Why don't all the arm chair Water Engineers out there take some time to read of the St. John's Regional Water Study. Take some time to inform yourselves before posting idiotic ideas and comments.

    http://www.stjohns.ca/cityhall/pdfs/St.%20John's%20Regional%20Water%20Supply%20Update%20to%201994%20Report.pdf

  • Stan
    July 01, 2010 - 20:03

    I NEED MY POOL FILED WITH SOMETHING TO KEEP THE ROACHES OUT

  • Taxpayer
    July 01, 2010 - 20:03

    Just one more example of the contempt those at city hall have for the average taxpayer. We pay for this service, and the infrastructure, but what do we get? Ugly brown lawns, ten bucks to get the car washed,showering with buckets. I feel like I'm living in a third world country!
    As for water going to the sea, two years ago we were experiencing yellow brown water on our street. The city came in and opened up a hydrant, they let it run full bore for days and days. The guy said we don't use enough water on our street, flow too slow, so they will be installing an underground valve that keeps the flow high by pouring water into the storm drain. I wonder how many more of these are out there?Talk about waste!

  • Matt
    July 01, 2010 - 20:02

    Nasty Nate: I question whether drinking water is a luxury, whether provided to foreigners or not (and I also wonder how many of these boats are ported in St. John's as part of the locally owned fishing fleet - they may not all be foreigners at all). I also find it ridiculous to suggest we're hurting because we can't water lawns. We have all the water we need. We may lack the water we *want* (there's a huge difference between needs and wants, you know), but nobody's turning on dry taps here. We're not suffering a real emergency water shortage. Fires are being fought, showers are available, cooking isn't a problem, drinking water safely and reliably flows. Let's not get hysterical about our current situation. Frustrating? Sure. Emergency? Get your priorities straight.

    Shutting off fresh water supply - which is sold, not given - to ships would limit the port's utility. To suggest such an over-reaction is laughable.

    Finally, don't forget, you don't need a meter to know the maximum flow for the purposes of billing a ship. The city knows the pressure on the line (it's going to constant) and they know the diameter of the line feeding it. They know the GPM (gallons per minute) that the water flows. From that, you can easily establish a rate based on probable demand. Water meters are only needed when nobody knows how often the water is started/stopped (for example, in your residence, unless you want a city employee sitting around with a stop watch each time you turn on a tap - no thanks, I'll take the meter).

    This is a non-story designed to whip up false outrage from the usual know-nothings. Hey look at all the posts! It worked!

  • Monty to Jason
    July 01, 2010 - 20:01

    Well, Jason. If the City is following their own rules, they should be using recycled water for their flowers and gardens. I guess that means they've drained off all the councillors' swimming pools perhaps?

  • Telling it like it is
    July 01, 2010 - 19:59

    This water ban is getting ridiculous. I mean, I've seen the Great Pyramids of Giza, Stonehenge, The Eiffel Tower, The Great Wall of China, Angel Falls, The Taj Mahal, The Colosseum, Mount Fuji, The River Nile, The Parthenon, and I've also flown FIRST CLASS to every major airport on the planet and I've never seen or heard tell of such a thing as a water ban. This is madness.......



    ......And ohh yeah, I was the first person to walk on the moon and the first person to scale Mount Everest...and I did it at the same time.

  • Einstein
    July 01, 2010 - 19:59

    This province is heading down the crapper faster than the economy is recovering.

    I'm glad my Electrical Engineering degree will offer me a long laster, successful and plentiful career.

    To those will be remaining on this crap, I mean Rock...good luck!

  • Neighboring
    July 01, 2010 - 19:59

    I don't get it. I agree you can see the edges of the lake. Do they really think its going to be drained dry? Its like it year after year, after year, etc...

    We live in NF where it rains every other day except for a week or two during the summer. So, the red flags are raised and people can't water lawns, flowers, wash cars all things that are apart of summer. Go figure

  • Paul
    July 01, 2010 - 19:58

    DK is thinking right. Haven't washed my truck ever. That being said we haven't watered our lawn all year and she's still pretty green. Make sure you leave it long when cutting for one. Beyond that I can't really see the preoccupation with solid grass lawns. They are boring. Rather some wild flowers, interesting bushes and trees. Grass lawns just give you something to do, cut them, weed them, fertilize them. Unless you are practicing soccer they aren't much use, especial out front where no one ever hangs around. But back to the water for boats I can't understand the two-tiered price of the water. Isn't the 4th hour water just as valuable as the first?? Although ports should like to provide water there is a place and time when that is not possible. I'm sure that other major ports in dry countries don't have water to spare and that boats understand that fact and get water where they can. Also water in some places will be more expensive so they will get it where it costs less as well. We may as well make sure we get sensible value for our water if we are going to sell it.

  • Amy
    July 01, 2010 - 19:55

    Can anyone tell me how developers keeps get the ok to put up these subdivisions when every summer St. John's is in a water crisis... where is the water coming for these new houses/communities. They haven't even sussed out resources to accomodate the current residents. Don't get people started on sewage... but shouldn't at least the water issue be considered first. Where is the planning???? Don't we have some engineers who are considering this issue?

  • watering the narrows
    July 01, 2010 - 19:55

    NOW.. I was walking to the Fort Amherst lighthouse yesterday and heard water running over the rocks below a guardrail. Thinking it was run off from the southside hills I thought no more of it. Upon further investigation I noticed a 4 inch maybe larger city water main pumping gallons of water into the narrows. WHY??? I asked a local and he said it's been running like this for close on 3 years 24/7. I guess Paul Mackey or Art Cheeseman should be sent a watering fine.

  • Earl
    July 01, 2010 - 19:47

    A few weeks ago I noticed something else that needs the City's attention: Ships allowed to use leaky hoses to hook up to the water supply. I went for a walk along the waterfront that day and noticed no less than four hoses with miniature fountains spraying water onto the ground, only to be evaporated by the hot sun. Water being sprayed onto the ground 24/7 is not good for the water supply!

  • b
    July 01, 2010 - 19:46

    What an interesting FYI on the water supplied to ships by the City.

    Anybody want to bet that Okeefe offers water free to the cruise ships...wink wink nudge nude.

    Been on any cruises lately Dennis?

  • Stan
    July 01, 2010 - 19:45

    why the %^&( would anyone care about green lawns? now, not being able to swim in a personal pool is third worldish

  • Joe
    July 01, 2010 - 19:44

    WHAT??? WE, the people who pay the taxes here have to conserve, yet ships that are coming and going into other ports can have the water?
    When I developed my yard the city hit me with a tax increase because my property was worth more. Now the whole yard is dying, grass, flowers, the whole lot. Can I get a tax credit??? Come on Landscapers, take this and run with it! For a couple of hundred dollars, a ship can fill up? Where's Dennis O'keefe? Ohhhh, he's standing next to the ship taking full advantage of the photo opportunity! Lovely! What a bunch of idiots! We have had water bans in the past, it's not unheard of. The Councillors knew it was coming again, why haven't they planned ahead and pumped water from elsewhere? On Google Maps, Paddy's Pond and Thomas Pond look even closer than Big Pond which is running out. Where's the planning? We're in Newfoundland, we can't go for a walk without having to step around a pond for God's sake!

  • Nasty Nate
    July 01, 2010 - 19:44

    these ships can get water from other ports. it makes no sense to offer this luxury to foreigners when our own people hurt. the city of st johns just cant pull into somebody elses port and fuel up with unmetered water. these ships will still come to sell there goods and make big piles of money but they should carry enough water from their last port of call and use it wisely.

    put out a special marine notice on noaa and state that the residents of the city of st johns are suffering from an emergency water shortage and emergency ban and that no water is supplied at this port.

    only a third world country can argue with this