Minister outlines actions to protect endangered species

Staff ~ The Telegram
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

Two endangered species in the province will benefit from recovery plans released today by Environment Minister Charlene Johnson.
A migratory bird called the Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa), along with the Crowded Wormseed Mustard (Erysimum inconspicuum var. coarctatum), a flowering plant, are both listed as endangered under the province's Endangered Species Act.
"As both of these species are listed under the Endangered Species Act, they require recovery plans," Johnson said. "It is important that we assess all of our species at risk and make the necessary recommendations regarding their protection and recovery."
The Red Knot is a medium-sized migratory shorebird that breeds in the Canadian Arctic and winters in South America. Red Knots stop in Newfoundland and Labrador during fall migration, making use of shorelines, sand flats and salt marshes as feeding and resting areas.
The recovery plan for this species includes such actions as an assessment of the population during its stopover in the province; identification of threats; determination of the appropriate levels of protection; and the need to increase awareness to encourage public responsibility towards the recovery of this species.
The Crowded Wormseed Mustard is a yellow-flowered biennial or short-lived perennial herb. Within Newfoundland and Labrador, it is known to exist in only one location on the West Coast of the island. The plant inhabits the edge of an unstable coastal cliff subject to grazing pressure from livestock in the adjacent meadow. Its population is very small and is estimated at 100 mature plants.
Recovery actions highlighted for this species include: a population inventory and monitoring; population and habitat management; off-site conservation measures, which may include seed banking and housing a collection of live specimens; possible introduction of new populations in appropriate habitat; research and informing local land users of the need for conservation; and soliciting participation in the recovery of the species.

Geographic location: Newfoundland and Labrador, South America, West Coast

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • dwayne
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Any ideas on the Red Wine Caribou ??

  • don
    July 02, 2010 - 13:21

    Just wait until some developer of a multi-million dollar real estate development gets a stop work order because the excavation of the site might kill a single Crowded Wormseed Mustard plant or destroy the near extinct Whistling warbler tomato tree plant or threaten the habitat of the rare Port-de-Grave cod fish oil eater bird! The courts will uphold the regulations and the developer will kiss Newfoundland and Labrador goodbye! This is the thin edge of the wedge folks. There are clearly too many graduates of the biology, botanical and archaeology programs at MUN working for the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. Apparently these geniuses have nothing better to do with their time other than to persuade the Ministers of rusty nails, broken ceramics and blooms, birds and bunnies to pass regulations to protect every seed, flower, tree, bush, cat, bird, dog, broken dish, rusty nail and moose in the Province! Who is responsible for this nonsense? Whoever you are, go get a real job and stop infringing on the rights of people who are trying to make a living on this god forsaken over regulated rock!!!!

  • Peter
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    Don get a clue, there is life outside of the cul-de-sac, stop being so ignorant, you are embarrassing the province.

  • Krista
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    Wow Don, I'm sure our grandkids will thank you when they have to go to museums to see what their province used to look like before their natural history was sold out for temporary jobs.

  • dwayne
    July 01, 2010 - 20:06

    Any ideas on the Red Wine Caribou ??

  • don
    July 01, 2010 - 20:05

    Just wait until some developer of a multi-million dollar real estate development gets a stop work order because the excavation of the site might kill a single Crowded Wormseed Mustard plant or destroy the near extinct Whistling warbler tomato tree plant or threaten the habitat of the rare Port-de-Grave cod fish oil eater bird! The courts will uphold the regulations and the developer will kiss Newfoundland and Labrador goodbye! This is the thin edge of the wedge folks. There are clearly too many graduates of the biology, botanical and archaeology programs at MUN working for the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. Apparently these geniuses have nothing better to do with their time other than to persuade the Ministers of rusty nails, broken ceramics and blooms, birds and bunnies to pass regulations to protect every seed, flower, tree, bush, cat, bird, dog, broken dish, rusty nail and moose in the Province! Who is responsible for this nonsense? Whoever you are, go get a real job and stop infringing on the rights of people who are trying to make a living on this god forsaken over regulated rock!!!!

  • Peter
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    Don get a clue, there is life outside of the cul-de-sac, stop being so ignorant, you are embarrassing the province.

  • Krista
    July 01, 2010 - 19:44

    Wow Don, I'm sure our grandkids will thank you when they have to go to museums to see what their province used to look like before their natural history was sold out for temporary jobs.