Panel sets crab prices

Staff ~ The Telegram
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The Standing Price-Setting Panel has set the price of crab for the 2010 harvest at $1.35 per pound.

Fisheries Minister Clyde Jackman confirmed the decision Friday.

The panel made its decision without any input from the Association of Seafood Producers, which represents the bulk of crab producers in the province.

St. John's -

The Standing Price-Setting Panel has set the price of crab for the 2010 harvest at $1.35 per pound.

Fisheries Minister Clyde Jackman confirmed the decision Friday.

The panel made its decision without any input from the Association of Seafood Producers, which represents the bulk of crab producers in the province.

The association is boycotting the panel, having accused it of being biased in favour of harvesters and the Fish, Food and Allied Workers' union.

It's not known if the price will mean a timely start to the fishery.

Harvesters have previously stated they cannot fish for anything less than a $1.50 per pound, while producers have suggested such a position is "divorced from reality" because of the weak marketplace.

Organizations: Association of Seafood Producers, Allied Workers

Geographic location: St. John's

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Recent comments

  • Steve
    July 02, 2010 - 13:12

    I have no idea what kind of a process we could have to rectify what seems to drag on year after year in our fishing industry.

    I can't see with the current system you will ever satisfy all of the stakeholders.

    If the price is too low it is good for the processors and bad for the harvesters. If it is the other way then it is reversed.

    Unfortunately we have mostly a market driven economy with supply and demand dictating the pricing in most things that we consume. I guess the matter only gets compounded when many times it is looked at as a luxury item and not a necessity of life, that only increases the volatility of the demand.

    If you looked at it from an oil producers point of view, if the price is not right they don't pump it out of the ground.

    I guess it may be all to easy to say if the price is not right than leave it in the water.

  • Steve
    July 01, 2010 - 19:49

    I have no idea what kind of a process we could have to rectify what seems to drag on year after year in our fishing industry.

    I can't see with the current system you will ever satisfy all of the stakeholders.

    If the price is too low it is good for the processors and bad for the harvesters. If it is the other way then it is reversed.

    Unfortunately we have mostly a market driven economy with supply and demand dictating the pricing in most things that we consume. I guess the matter only gets compounded when many times it is looked at as a luxury item and not a necessity of life, that only increases the volatility of the demand.

    If you looked at it from an oil producers point of view, if the price is not right they don't pump it out of the ground.

    I guess it may be all to easy to say if the price is not right than leave it in the water.