Nalcor has interest in planned line to New York City

Rob Antle
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Energy N.L. energy company inked non-binding MOU

The province's energy corporation has expressed an interest in a planned new power line that would connect Quebec with lucrative power markets in New York City.

Nalcor Energy recently signed a non-binding memorandum of understanding with Transmission Developers Inc. (TDI).

TDI is planning a high-voltage direct-current line that would run underwater from Lake Champlain all the way down the Hudson River to Manhattan.

Nalcor CEO Ed Martin

The province's energy corporation has expressed an interest in a planned new power line that would connect Quebec with lucrative power markets in New York City.

Nalcor Energy recently signed a non-binding memorandum of understanding with Transmission Developers Inc. (TDI).

TDI is planning a high-voltage direct-current line that would run underwater from Lake Champlain all the way down the Hudson River to Manhattan.

The idea has not been opposed by environmental groups, who have condemned new overhead transmission lines and towers.

TDI has an active application pending in Phase 2 of a U.S. government program that provides loan guarantees for transmission projects.

It also boasts The Blackstone Group - described as the world's largest alternative asset manager - as lead financial partner.

Nalcor CEO Ed Martin said those factors played a big role in Nalcor deciding to support the TDI plan.

"I think what captured our attention here was that they had qualified for Phase 2 of the U.S. loan guarantee program," Martin said. "That's a pretty big step."

Nalcor does not have any money in the potential project to date, but has not ruled out the possibility of taking on an equity stake in the future.

"We don't feel compelled to own transmission in New York," Martin said. "If it was a relationship where we were one of the players on the line and we had guaranteed access for a particular price, that would suit us fine.

"If they need it for financing purposes ... if they want us to take an equity position - if it's OK in that jurisdiction - we wouldn't shy away from that."

He said Nalcor would only do so if the economics make sense.

Martin noted Nalcor's support gives TDI's application a "good solid generation source to anchor their application."

The energy corporation is continuing work to develop the potential 3,000-megawatt Lower Churchill hydro project.

"New York is a key market for us no matter how you look at our project," Martin said.

Nalcor is waiting on a Quebec regulator to rule on its request for access to that province's power grid.

The power company is exploring its options for wheeling Labrador power to markets in Ontario, New England and New York.

rantle@thetelegram.com

Organizations: The Blackstone Group

Geographic location: New York City, Quebec, U.S. Lake Champlain Hudson River Manhattan Ontario New England

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Recent comments

  • Don
    July 02, 2010 - 13:35

    Great idea, but Quebec will have NALCOR by the throat and will extract the lions share of profits from any transmission of power to the New York area. Regardless of what NALCOR wants to do, Quebec has the final say. NALCOR cannot change the geographic and political boundaries which separate Labrador from the markets in the USA and Canada where it wants to sell electricity. NALCOR is at a distinct disadvantage and the Courts in Quebec will not assist in overcoming the barriers which exist. Blame the British bureaucrats who agreed to allow the French to continue to occupy Quebec after the defeat on the Plains of Abraham. Bad decision then, bad decision now!

  • John Doe
    July 02, 2010 - 13:29

    If the 24,000 people of Labrador want to separate then I guess that's what they should do. However, it's far from being as simple, as some of the more simple mined poster from Labrador may make it seem. The educational system, the healthcare system, highways infrastructure. There has been a lot of money spent in Lab. over the last few years. We must remember, that while the resources of Labrador contribute greatly, at times, to the coffers of the province,the tax base the 24,000 people provide is extreamly small. Mt. Pearl has more people in it than all of Labrador. So, imagine a town the size of Mt. Pearl, with all the new schools, and highways, and even hospitals that are provided to the people of Labrador. Funny how when there was a massive downturn in the economy last year, and the mines were laying people off in droves, we never heard a peep from the Bloc Labrador. LOL

  • Paul
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    The people of Labrador have absolutely no right to separate any more than the Baie Verte peninsula. That's my land up there buddy and you can't take it from me.

  • jim
    July 02, 2010 - 13:20

    Quebec Hydro are much further ahead on a corridor through New Hampshire. And they are also in talks with TDI.Good luck with that Nalcor.

  • Tim
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    I don't know who you are Lab12 but you sound like one of those silly Anglo-Saxons who move to Labrador from the Island, to work in the resource sector probably, and then after 10 or 15 years (or maybe even a generation) you're complaining about how Newfoundland is taking advantage of Labrador and stealing it's resources, and you threaten us with separation. Unless you're an Aboriginal (ie. a REAL Labradorian) Bud, shove a sock in it!

  • Newfoundland#1
    July 02, 2010 - 13:18

    Don't worry Lab12, Newfoundland will own Churchill Falls and control all rights to it and it's power corridors before we cut lose the rest of the whining dead weight to squabble amongst yourselves, drink yourselves into oblivion, or slaughter all your own wildlife for naught. Go back to sleep and get some rest.

  • Nasty
    July 02, 2010 - 13:17

    Since people love to toss me into things I thought I would look into it a little....

    Possible separation from Newfoundland

    A Royal Commission in 2002 determined that there is a certain amount of public pressure from Labradorians to break off from Newfoundland and become a separate province or territory. Some of the Innu nation would have the area become a homeland for them, much as Nunavut is for the Inuit; a 1999 resolution of the Assembly of First Nations claimed Labrador as a homeland for the Innu and demanded recognition in any further constitutional negotiations regarding the region.[8] The Inuit self-government region of Nunatsiavut was recently created through agreements with the provincial and federal governments.

    Looks like this issue is still on the books and not by any means a done deal which could be started up should the right conditions persist. Seems that the Island needs to be a little more respective if it wants to retain any control in the future of the Churchill Falls projects. But hey, thats just my view.

  • Lab12
    July 02, 2010 - 13:17

    You would think that NALCOR needs better generation before this is considered. After all by the time Quebec needs to return the Churchill to Labrador, Newfoundland will no longer be part of the equation. Labrador will have long separated from Newfoundland and any claim or statement NALCOR makes today needs to be back with a resource they will control. Maybe we can sell NALCOR our power to resell, never know. Remember Newfoundland the people of Labrador have the right to vote to separate and will use that right.

  • DB
    July 02, 2010 - 13:17

    To Lab12 when do you leave so I can lock the door as for your history lesson yawn.

  • Manny
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    Lab12 is NastNate..LOL.

  • Educate
    July 02, 2010 - 13:14

    The real sad part in this is nothing has really changed - http://www.gov.nl.ca/publicat/royalcomm/WhatWeHeard.pdf

    All that has changed is the few rich continue to benefit from those they take from both on the Island and in Labrador. Working together has not nor will ever happen with the types of leadership we elect. We reap what we sow. No wonder the jokes will never end.

  • Lab12
    July 02, 2010 - 13:13

    On a map of 1529 it is written, Terra del Labrador; This country was discovered by people of the town of Bristol, and because he who first sighted land was a labourer, from the island of the Azores, it was named after him. The Lavrador was Joao Fernandes and the year was 1501. [Lavrador meaning labourer]


    In 1668 King Charles II of England granted the Hudson Bay Company all of Labrador and the land around Hudson Bay, comprising approximately one third of Canada. An overlapping grant was made to Courtemanche by the King of France in 1702. Courtemanche was given the land from the Gulf of St. Lawrence northward to the Churchill River and Hamilton Inlet. Although he was thought to be the first European settler, his journal reads: The Eskimaux are becoming more sociable and are beginning to trade with the French, who are settled there (Hamilton Inlet) and who trade in their commodities. It appears that these Frenchman preceded Courtemanche by a few years. When Courtemanche died in 1717, his son-in-law, Brouage, took his place. Brouage learned the Inuit language and was probably the first to write down the stories and traditions of the Inuit.

    The Moravian Missions in Labrador sprang out of the missions in Greenland and in 1752 they sent their first missionaries to Labrador.

    The Moravians were not to return to Labrador again until 1770, by which time King George III granted them their choice of one hundred thousand acres of the Labrador coast. When they arrived they not only met a previous Inuit acquaintance, Segulliak, but also Mikak, who had been taken to England by Lieut. Lucas in 1767 and was one of the few Inuit who lived to return to Labrador. She and her husband, Tuglavina, played a large role in the establishment of the mission.

    No mention of Newfoundland anywhere. Seems pretty odd if you ask me. Maybe we need to repatriate with England or France then.

  • fishsticks
    July 02, 2010 - 13:13

    Money for eveything else, even for non existant markets. But not for air planes or Cameron inquries. And All for trying to guide a bit water down into a turbine. Making a mountain out of a mole hill and its a full time job. Eddy looks like he's been sitting down for to long. It mush be alot harder to try and BS the whole province.

  • M
    July 02, 2010 - 13:12

    You'd think from some of the comments the article was about the island vs. Labrador - it's about NL's collective interest. Let's no fall into the old trap of squabbling amongst ourselves and losing sight of the real prize.

  • Jordan
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    Lab12

    Labrador is better off being a part of a province then being its own territory. If Labrador feels like they're being screwed by being a part of Newfoundland and Labrador wait till they're a territory, they will get more even more screwed by Ottawa.

  • Don
    July 01, 2010 - 20:25

    Great idea, but Quebec will have NALCOR by the throat and will extract the lions share of profits from any transmission of power to the New York area. Regardless of what NALCOR wants to do, Quebec has the final say. NALCOR cannot change the geographic and political boundaries which separate Labrador from the markets in the USA and Canada where it wants to sell electricity. NALCOR is at a distinct disadvantage and the Courts in Quebec will not assist in overcoming the barriers which exist. Blame the British bureaucrats who agreed to allow the French to continue to occupy Quebec after the defeat on the Plains of Abraham. Bad decision then, bad decision now!

  • John Doe
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    If the 24,000 people of Labrador want to separate then I guess that's what they should do. However, it's far from being as simple, as some of the more simple mined poster from Labrador may make it seem. The educational system, the healthcare system, highways infrastructure. There has been a lot of money spent in Lab. over the last few years. We must remember, that while the resources of Labrador contribute greatly, at times, to the coffers of the province,the tax base the 24,000 people provide is extreamly small. Mt. Pearl has more people in it than all of Labrador. So, imagine a town the size of Mt. Pearl, with all the new schools, and highways, and even hospitals that are provided to the people of Labrador. Funny how when there was a massive downturn in the economy last year, and the mines were laying people off in droves, we never heard a peep from the Bloc Labrador. LOL

  • Paul
    July 01, 2010 - 20:07

    The people of Labrador have absolutely no right to separate any more than the Baie Verte peninsula. That's my land up there buddy and you can't take it from me.

  • jim
    July 01, 2010 - 20:03

    Quebec Hydro are much further ahead on a corridor through New Hampshire. And they are also in talks with TDI.Good luck with that Nalcor.

  • Tim
    July 01, 2010 - 20:01

    I don't know who you are Lab12 but you sound like one of those silly Anglo-Saxons who move to Labrador from the Island, to work in the resource sector probably, and then after 10 or 15 years (or maybe even a generation) you're complaining about how Newfoundland is taking advantage of Labrador and stealing it's resources, and you threaten us with separation. Unless you're an Aboriginal (ie. a REAL Labradorian) Bud, shove a sock in it!

  • Newfoundland#1
    July 01, 2010 - 19:59

    Don't worry Lab12, Newfoundland will own Churchill Falls and control all rights to it and it's power corridors before we cut lose the rest of the whining dead weight to squabble amongst yourselves, drink yourselves into oblivion, or slaughter all your own wildlife for naught. Go back to sleep and get some rest.

  • Nasty
    July 01, 2010 - 19:58

    Since people love to toss me into things I thought I would look into it a little....

    Possible separation from Newfoundland

    A Royal Commission in 2002 determined that there is a certain amount of public pressure from Labradorians to break off from Newfoundland and become a separate province or territory. Some of the Innu nation would have the area become a homeland for them, much as Nunavut is for the Inuit; a 1999 resolution of the Assembly of First Nations claimed Labrador as a homeland for the Innu and demanded recognition in any further constitutional negotiations regarding the region.[8] The Inuit self-government region of Nunatsiavut was recently created through agreements with the provincial and federal governments.

    Looks like this issue is still on the books and not by any means a done deal which could be started up should the right conditions persist. Seems that the Island needs to be a little more respective if it wants to retain any control in the future of the Churchill Falls projects. But hey, thats just my view.

  • Lab12
    July 01, 2010 - 19:58

    You would think that NALCOR needs better generation before this is considered. After all by the time Quebec needs to return the Churchill to Labrador, Newfoundland will no longer be part of the equation. Labrador will have long separated from Newfoundland and any claim or statement NALCOR makes today needs to be back with a resource they will control. Maybe we can sell NALCOR our power to resell, never know. Remember Newfoundland the people of Labrador have the right to vote to separate and will use that right.

  • DB
    July 01, 2010 - 19:58

    To Lab12 when do you leave so I can lock the door as for your history lesson yawn.

  • Manny
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    Lab12 is NastNate..LOL.

  • Educate
    July 01, 2010 - 19:52

    The real sad part in this is nothing has really changed - http://www.gov.nl.ca/publicat/royalcomm/WhatWeHeard.pdf

    All that has changed is the few rich continue to benefit from those they take from both on the Island and in Labrador. Working together has not nor will ever happen with the types of leadership we elect. We reap what we sow. No wonder the jokes will never end.

  • Lab12
    July 01, 2010 - 19:52

    On a map of 1529 it is written, Terra del Labrador; This country was discovered by people of the town of Bristol, and because he who first sighted land was a labourer, from the island of the Azores, it was named after him. The Lavrador was Joao Fernandes and the year was 1501. [Lavrador meaning labourer]


    In 1668 King Charles II of England granted the Hudson Bay Company all of Labrador and the land around Hudson Bay, comprising approximately one third of Canada. An overlapping grant was made to Courtemanche by the King of France in 1702. Courtemanche was given the land from the Gulf of St. Lawrence northward to the Churchill River and Hamilton Inlet. Although he was thought to be the first European settler, his journal reads: The Eskimaux are becoming more sociable and are beginning to trade with the French, who are settled there (Hamilton Inlet) and who trade in their commodities. It appears that these Frenchman preceded Courtemanche by a few years. When Courtemanche died in 1717, his son-in-law, Brouage, took his place. Brouage learned the Inuit language and was probably the first to write down the stories and traditions of the Inuit.

    The Moravian Missions in Labrador sprang out of the missions in Greenland and in 1752 they sent their first missionaries to Labrador.

    The Moravians were not to return to Labrador again until 1770, by which time King George III granted them their choice of one hundred thousand acres of the Labrador coast. When they arrived they not only met a previous Inuit acquaintance, Segulliak, but also Mikak, who had been taken to England by Lieut. Lucas in 1767 and was one of the few Inuit who lived to return to Labrador. She and her husband, Tuglavina, played a large role in the establishment of the mission.

    No mention of Newfoundland anywhere. Seems pretty odd if you ask me. Maybe we need to repatriate with England or France then.

  • fishsticks
    July 01, 2010 - 19:50

    Money for eveything else, even for non existant markets. But not for air planes or Cameron inquries. And All for trying to guide a bit water down into a turbine. Making a mountain out of a mole hill and its a full time job. Eddy looks like he's been sitting down for to long. It mush be alot harder to try and BS the whole province.

  • M
    July 01, 2010 - 19:50

    You'd think from some of the comments the article was about the island vs. Labrador - it's about NL's collective interest. Let's no fall into the old trap of squabbling amongst ourselves and losing sight of the real prize.

  • Jordan
    July 01, 2010 - 19:45

    Lab12

    Labrador is better off being a part of a province then being its own territory. If Labrador feels like they're being screwed by being a part of Newfoundland and Labrador wait till they're a territory, they will get more even more screwed by Ottawa.