• 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • M
    July 02, 2010 - 13:34

    What a truly heart-warming story!

  • Helen
    July 02, 2010 - 13:33

    Excellent article! Quite a talent there, Roland! It's great that the art of boat-building is alive and well; it's a part of our culture that should certainly remain. My father and uncle used to build boats every winter; for their own use, and sometimes for sale. In fact, my Dad built a 16-footer last summer at the ripe old age of 87!

  • Polly
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    I would rather have 10,000 Roland Flynns in my life over the likes of one Williams , Kennedy , Browne , and so on .

  • The Good Old Days
    July 02, 2010 - 13:20

    This is a culture in itself. The language and the talents. Some of these gentlemen should be employed by the government to keep our history alive.
    This is as much a history of our culture and heritage as any other thing that comes out of Newfoundland and Labrador.

    There is the chance for employment. Lets step up to the plate.

  • Mary Ellen
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    I know this man personally.He tells it like it is.Great story.We could do with some more reading like it.

  • David
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    Nice story. Thanks to the Telegram for showing you folks on the Avalon the cute face of rural Newfoundland before its entirely wiped out.

    Let's just get this de-settlement program over with...

    Everyone over to the right side of the boat! After all, what could possibly go wrong?!

    Daddy, what's a fish?

  • Old Salt
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    Newfoundland's Roland Flynns are truly the salt of the earth. Us older types become concerned when we see old traditions die, when we see things change so fast. The over 60 set wants to hang on to the relics of what once was and I think there will be adequate opportunity to see, read, and preserve enough to satisfy us. I am not conviced that the younger ones who follow us really want or appreciate OUR window on the past. They will have their own different window and the reflection struggle will go on. That's life unfolding. Contribute, relax, enjoy and then pass peascefully on to your own eternal rest. The pattern has been and will continue to be repeated.

  • Telling it how Id
    July 02, 2010 - 13:14

    Bridget Curran of the anti sealing coalition would have you believe that this man is better off relocating to the big city, working for a souless multinational corporation than living in squaller.

    Thank you Bridget for making our heritage extinct.

  • Polly
    July 02, 2010 - 13:12

    The Telegram doesn't always get it right , but ,in today's front page story of Roland Flynn , they have managed to capture the true essence of a Newfoundlander . As a people , whether we live on or by the sea , or even if we are landlocked , the briny water surges through our veins , we cannot escape . The sea can be a heavy taskmaster , it is the giver and taker of life . Thank you Aaron Beswick , a fine story to be sure .

  • M
    July 01, 2010 - 20:23

    What a truly heart-warming story!

  • Helen
    July 01, 2010 - 20:22

    Excellent article! Quite a talent there, Roland! It's great that the art of boat-building is alive and well; it's a part of our culture that should certainly remain. My father and uncle used to build boats every winter; for their own use, and sometimes for sale. In fact, my Dad built a 16-footer last summer at the ripe old age of 87!

  • Polly
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    I would rather have 10,000 Roland Flynns in my life over the likes of one Williams , Kennedy , Browne , and so on .

  • The Good Old Days
    July 01, 2010 - 20:04

    This is a culture in itself. The language and the talents. Some of these gentlemen should be employed by the government to keep our history alive.
    This is as much a history of our culture and heritage as any other thing that comes out of Newfoundland and Labrador.

    There is the chance for employment. Lets step up to the plate.

  • Mary Ellen
    July 01, 2010 - 20:02

    I know this man personally.He tells it like it is.Great story.We could do with some more reading like it.

  • David
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    Nice story. Thanks to the Telegram for showing you folks on the Avalon the cute face of rural Newfoundland before its entirely wiped out.

    Let's just get this de-settlement program over with...

    Everyone over to the right side of the boat! After all, what could possibly go wrong?!

    Daddy, what's a fish?

  • Old Salt
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    Newfoundland's Roland Flynns are truly the salt of the earth. Us older types become concerned when we see old traditions die, when we see things change so fast. The over 60 set wants to hang on to the relics of what once was and I think there will be adequate opportunity to see, read, and preserve enough to satisfy us. I am not conviced that the younger ones who follow us really want or appreciate OUR window on the past. They will have their own different window and the reflection struggle will go on. That's life unfolding. Contribute, relax, enjoy and then pass peascefully on to your own eternal rest. The pattern has been and will continue to be repeated.

  • Telling it how Id
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    Bridget Curran of the anti sealing coalition would have you believe that this man is better off relocating to the big city, working for a souless multinational corporation than living in squaller.

    Thank you Bridget for making our heritage extinct.

  • Polly
    July 01, 2010 - 19:49

    The Telegram doesn't always get it right , but ,in today's front page story of Roland Flynn , they have managed to capture the true essence of a Newfoundlander . As a people , whether we live on or by the sea , or even if we are landlocked , the briny water surges through our veins , we cannot escape . The sea can be a heavy taskmaster , it is the giver and taker of life . Thank you Aaron Beswick , a fine story to be sure .