Deepwater drill ship heading to Orphan Basin

Moira Baird
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

ConocoPhillips wraps up south coast well

ConocoPhillips wrapped up work this week at its first exploration well in Newfoundland waters.

In the coming days, it will hand over the drill ship Stena Carron to Chevron Canada to drill another deepwater exploration well.

The 228-metre ship will resupply at sea near St. John's before heading to the Orphan Basin off Newfoundand's northeast coast.

ConocoPhillips wrapped up work this week at its first exploration well in Newfoundland waters.

In the coming days, it will hand over the drill ship Stena Carron to Chevron Canada to drill another deepwater exploration well.

The 228-metre ship will resupply at sea near St. John's before heading to the Orphan Basin off Newfoundand's northeast coast.

ConocoPhillips confirmed Thursday it had concluded its well dubbed East Wolverine G-37.

Spudded Nov. 24, the Laurentian Basin well took five months to finish during a winter drilling season - about 40 days longer than expected.

"The drilling program went a little longer then planned due to weather challenges," Rob Evans, spokesman for ConocoPhillips in Calgary, said in an e-mailed response.

"We are now in the process of analyzing the data collected from the drilling program."

Chevron expects to take possession of the drill ship early this coming week.

"The current plan is for the Carron to hold position offshore off St. John's for a week or so," said Tim Murphy, Chevron's external affairs manager for Atlantic Canada.

There, it will be supplied and equipped to drill the Lona O-55 well in the Orphan Basin located 427 kilometres northeast of St. John's.

Murphy expects the Stena Carron to arrive at the drill site by early May.

"Drilling would commence shortly after arrival on location. The exploration well will take several months to complete."

Lona O-55 will be Chevron's second exploration well in the remote basin.

Located in about 2,600 metres of water, the well is expected to set another Canadian record for deep-water offshore wells.

The record was set three years ago when Chevron drilled its first Orphan basin well, Great Barasway F-66, in 2,338 metres of water.

That dry well took the semi-submersible rig Eirik Raude six months to drill and was estimated to cost more than $200 million.

mbaird@thetelegram.com

Organizations: ConocoPhillips

Geographic location: St. John's, Newfoundland, Calgary Atlantic Canada Great Barasway

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • David
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    Sound to me like it cost a whole lot more staying at sea to be resupply,come to St.john,s.

  • David
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    Sound to me like it cost a whole lot more staying at sea to be resupply,come to St.john,s.