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  • Wild Salar
    September 26, 2013 - 18:39

    ASF is making this new industrial inland aquaculture idea sound pretty good, however they have no idea of the impact on the freshwater resources this may have. ASF were strong promoters of the of sea cage culture in not very long ago until they stopped making money of the industry now they are saying they made a mistake. How can we trust them from making another one which could pollute our freshwater resources and use massive quantities of ground water. ASF are coming across like they know what is best just like the scientist who managed our east coast fishery . My vote is no thanks ASF to this latest idea, just like I was against their Atlantic Salmon interbreeding program they carried out into the Bay Of Fundy in the 70's and 80's that released hundreds of thousands if not millions of smolt from all different genetic crosses. By the way this was a failure also. Sincerely, Wild Salar

  • Petertwo
    November 03, 2012 - 05:59

    Roy, you might help yourself if you did some research of your own, there's loads on the net. It is anglers fishing for salmon that are slowly bringing back the salmon and the ASF is in the front line. Think about it, if live release was not sucessful no angler would tolerate it, without the salmon there would be no salmon angling. There is still commercial salmon fishing in the North Atlantic and the stocks are not recovering as well as they should, plus the human competition with then for food, shrimp, herring etc., The seas are slowly dying with all the overfishing.

  • Casey
    November 02, 2012 - 17:29

    The ASF is full of it. The waters around NL have been teeming with Atlantic Salmon for the last 10 summers. Go to The NE coast and find out for yourself. Just because salmon don't go up the rivers in large numbers every season does not mean the stocks are low. Allow a limited commercial fishery and the market will have its share of clean, wild salmon, and the outport people will get a chance to make a living once again. A living that was ripped away from them for a pittance by the way. It is time for those so called conservationist groups to tell the whole story and stop trying to destroy outport NL..

  • Chantal
    November 01, 2012 - 10:20

    land-based salmon? I wonder how that would taste.

    • Sustainable supporter
      November 01, 2012 - 20:04

      It would taste as good or better than open net (ocean based) farmed salmon - without the chemicals, parasites, and disease that occur in oceans based environments. In the long run, cheaper to produce as well.

  • roy
    November 01, 2012 - 09:05

    In my humble opinion the Salmon Federation is full of "it". They promote salmon poaching in what they call "catch and relrase". when the majority of catch and release fisher person use this to high grade or only keep the size they want. They call it fun to hook a salmon and play it out till it is unlikely to survive. They only fish the best parts of the river and will force any other fisherperson out of that area. When i fish for cod i am required to keep any size and not throw any back. and only keep 5 fish per day i am sure there are more cod in the ocean than salmon. Like i said the salmon federation are full of "it".

    • Yer full of something
      November 01, 2012 - 20:10

      Either you are deliberately trying to mislead or you're just plain ignorant. Studies show that almost 100% of salmon angled through hook and release not only survive but spawn. Most catch and release anglers that I know don't fish anywhere near the most popular pools and even if they did, so what? Everyone has an equal right to fish where regulations permit and nobody can ''force'' another angler off a pool. Salmon angling is a sport. If you want meat, get it at the fish market. Your way of thinking is backwards and thankfully, only embraced by the few that are desperately clinging to practices used in days when salmon stocks were actually healthy.