Province announces $30M in road tenders

James
James McLeod
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Minister working to have road tenders out early

Transportation Minister Nick McGrath got a warm welcome from the Heavy Civil Association of Newfoundland and Labrador Thursday when he announced plans to tweak the province’s tendering process

Transportation Minisgter Nick McGrath

McGrath said that he wants tenders for roadwork to happen earlier in the year — late January or early February — so that contractors can hit the ground running in the spring as soon as the construction season starts.

A year ago, at the 2013 pre-budget consultations, it was the Heavy Civil Association that asked for this exact reform to the tendering system.

The association has a lot of skin in the game; it’s an industry group representing companies that build roads, sewers, bridges, wharves and other big infrastructure in the province.

McGrath acknowledged the problem that comes from issuing tenders after the budget is passed in April or May.

“I know that there have been some discussions for quite some time around the challenges of public-sector spending,” McGrath said.

“Tenders are issued well after the release of the annual provincial budget resulting in project contracts being awarded well into our short construction season.”

Basically, the government will now put up

$30 million worth of roadwork ahead of the provincial budget. The exact total amount of money to be spent on road maintenance for the year won’t be announced until budget day, but the $30-million early chunk means that companies will be able to secure some contracts and get to work as soon as the weather gets warmer.

“If I get tenders out early, you’re going to have to make sure the work gets done,” McGrath told the crowd.

Then somebody interrupted his speech to shout, “We’ll get it done.”

 

 

Organizations: Heavy Civil Association

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Recent comments

  • Tax Paying Citizen
    January 15, 2014 - 08:30

    Unless government is going to hold the companies accountable for laying crappy asphalt, it is pointless to be spending millions of our tax-paying dollars in new pavement. For what? So that in 3 years time they can shave the top off to cap it and have crappy roads again 1 year later. I would like to challenge the premier and her posse to drive some of our roads daily and let us know if they are fit and safe to drive!! I'm surprised more people haven't been killed. Even on OZFM the Dawn Patrol team are advising motorist to watch for moose and "ruts in the road"!!! How bad is that!!!

  • Tax Paying Citizen
    January 15, 2014 - 08:28

    Unless government is going to hold the companies accountable for laying crappy asphalt, it is pointless to be spending millions of our tax-paying dollars in new pavement. For what? So that in 3 years time they can shave the top off to cap it and have crappy roads again 1 year later. I would like to challenge the premier and her posse to drive some of our roads daily and let us know if they are fit and safe to drive!! I'm surprised more people haven't been killed. Even on OZFM the Dawn Patrol team are advising motorist to watch for moose and "ruts in the road"!!! How bad is that!!!

  • Observer
    January 13, 2014 - 07:11

    When we were going to "finish the drive in 65" the Provincial Government told us it cost 1 million dollars per mile of 2 lane blacktop. That was at 1964 prices. Just how much road will be done at today's prices? 30 million is nothing, they will spend that on planning the work.

  • Observer
    January 13, 2014 - 07:10

    When we were going to "finish the drive in 65" the Provincial Government told us it cost 1 million dollars per mile of 2 lane blacktop. That was at 1964 prices. Just how much road will be done at today's prices? 30 million is nothing, they will spend that on planning the work.