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Recent comments

  • Dave
    July 02, 2010 - 13:35

    Mark and Mike, sorry to tell you but there are lots of us who can afford the house prices and furniture to match. Not sure what you guys did, but two degrees can do a lot you ya these days.

  • dawn
    July 02, 2010 - 13:35

    So , yes all of these houses are being built, but did anyone think about where the infrastructure is coming from to support all of these homes? eg water supplies. when the summer hits, we are not allowed to wash cars or flowers and it has nothing to do with lack of rain, it has to do with the lack of water. All of these homes are being built and are they coming up with more water supplies? No these houses are feeding off of the same as the ones we use !!I think something needs to be done about this as well

  • Mike
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    Increasing housing prices without the matching wages can only lead to the economy going downhill. Alot of these people will be House Poor and have no extra income for anything else . I think in 10 years or so we'll see alot more run down houses as people won't have the disposable income to maintain their properties.

    I get the feeling alot of people will be in over there heads

  • J
    July 02, 2010 - 13:24

    I feel that it's the Real Estate agents buying these homes and renting them out.

  • Mark
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    Dawn, you have brought up a very important point which will be front and center in late summer, at which point the city council will act as if they are shocked and surprised we have no water. What gets me is developers make lots of money while we lose water we once had. I feel like Im being robbed more and more each year, and because the council seems to be doing nothing about it, they are complicit by non-action.


    Mike, there are already a few areas around which were considered nice areas with nice homes when they first went up. As time went by, many of these homes are now in serious need of repair, and because there are so many of them in dilapidated condition, one would speculate the owners are house poor. I.E. Admiralty Wood in Mount Pearl and Trail's End in Paradise. I remember looking at many homes in those areas and was disappointed in the condition of almost every single one when I was in the market and was considering an existing home.

  • Jon
    July 02, 2010 - 13:18

    Mark, there are more people moving here from outside the province. I see it in my work as people are moving here mostly from NB and ON. It will be interesting to see updated population data for St. John's and the province as a whole.

  • Calvin
    July 02, 2010 - 13:18

    I think you are close to being right Mark, there will be abandoned slums in the city before long as people move into new homes and older homes go un-occupied. I would like to know what the city/province is doing to accomodate all this housing with regards to schools, hospitals, (I would say shopping centres but we know we have enough of those), doctors, dentists, community centers, parks, etc. My child is starting school in September at Roncalli in Airport Heights and they have to put one of the kindergarten classes in the school cafeteria to accomodate all of the students. Airport Heights has about 400 new homes going up in the next 2 years. At a provincial estimate of 1.2 children per household that is 480 new kids in the area. Let's say 1/4 of them are going to be of the age to be attedning Roncalli, that means the school has to find room for another 120 children in the next few years. They asked the government for 10.5 million dollars to upgrade the facility to adjust for the growth in the area, and the government gave them 2.5 million. This allows them to add 4 new classrooms and upgrade the existing washrooms. No expansion to library, computer or cafeteria facilities, not to mention the horrid excuse for a parking lot sitting in front of the building. I use all of this as an example, I am sure that most of the schools in the Avalon region are in the same predicament. The provincial government recently stated that the children are our future, but they are not doing anything to assist in the prosperity of that future. Urban sprawl and an inability to manage social resources will be the downfall of Newfoundland and Labrador, in a future where prosperity and economic stability are touted as being sure things, unless something si done to correct these growing mistakes. The municipal, provincial and federal governments need to acknowledge these issues in Newfoundland, and other parts of the country, before Canada takes the turn into the same pitfalls that currently entrench the U.S.

  • Mark
    July 02, 2010 - 13:16

    Dave from NL are you saying two degrees means the same number of people (same population) are buying these new homes but keeping their old ones ? That seems wasteful if there is no one to occupy them, unless they are, which means the old homes are abandoned and those people with two degrees are creating slums. Sorry Dave, I'll go with Jon from St. John's, NL's answer since it has more common sense and is not ridden with poor spelling and grammar like yours is - from a person with two degrees. (Where do these people come from ?)

  • Mike
    July 02, 2010 - 13:10

    What kind of Jobs do these people have to afford a $250 000 home? And most of these homes need work. Do they not have furniture?

  • Mark
    July 02, 2010 - 13:10

    Where are these people coming from ? Or are there that many abandoned old homes around the city as people buy new ones ? Are we creating slums ?

  • Dave
    July 01, 2010 - 20:25

    Mark and Mike, sorry to tell you but there are lots of us who can afford the house prices and furniture to match. Not sure what you guys did, but two degrees can do a lot you ya these days.

  • dawn
    July 01, 2010 - 20:24

    So , yes all of these houses are being built, but did anyone think about where the infrastructure is coming from to support all of these homes? eg water supplies. when the summer hits, we are not allowed to wash cars or flowers and it has nothing to do with lack of rain, it has to do with the lack of water. All of these homes are being built and are they coming up with more water supplies? No these houses are feeding off of the same as the ones we use !!I think something needs to be done about this as well

  • Mike
    July 01, 2010 - 20:13

    Increasing housing prices without the matching wages can only lead to the economy going downhill. Alot of these people will be House Poor and have no extra income for anything else . I think in 10 years or so we'll see alot more run down houses as people won't have the disposable income to maintain their properties.

    I get the feeling alot of people will be in over there heads

  • J
    July 01, 2010 - 20:10

    I feel that it's the Real Estate agents buying these homes and renting them out.

  • Mark
    July 01, 2010 - 20:02

    Dawn, you have brought up a very important point which will be front and center in late summer, at which point the city council will act as if they are shocked and surprised we have no water. What gets me is developers make lots of money while we lose water we once had. I feel like Im being robbed more and more each year, and because the council seems to be doing nothing about it, they are complicit by non-action.


    Mike, there are already a few areas around which were considered nice areas with nice homes when they first went up. As time went by, many of these homes are now in serious need of repair, and because there are so many of them in dilapidated condition, one would speculate the owners are house poor. I.E. Admiralty Wood in Mount Pearl and Trail's End in Paradise. I remember looking at many homes in those areas and was disappointed in the condition of almost every single one when I was in the market and was considering an existing home.

  • Jon
    July 01, 2010 - 20:00

    Mark, there are more people moving here from outside the province. I see it in my work as people are moving here mostly from NB and ON. It will be interesting to see updated population data for St. John's and the province as a whole.

  • Calvin
    July 01, 2010 - 19:59

    I think you are close to being right Mark, there will be abandoned slums in the city before long as people move into new homes and older homes go un-occupied. I would like to know what the city/province is doing to accomodate all this housing with regards to schools, hospitals, (I would say shopping centres but we know we have enough of those), doctors, dentists, community centers, parks, etc. My child is starting school in September at Roncalli in Airport Heights and they have to put one of the kindergarten classes in the school cafeteria to accomodate all of the students. Airport Heights has about 400 new homes going up in the next 2 years. At a provincial estimate of 1.2 children per household that is 480 new kids in the area. Let's say 1/4 of them are going to be of the age to be attedning Roncalli, that means the school has to find room for another 120 children in the next few years. They asked the government for 10.5 million dollars to upgrade the facility to adjust for the growth in the area, and the government gave them 2.5 million. This allows them to add 4 new classrooms and upgrade the existing washrooms. No expansion to library, computer or cafeteria facilities, not to mention the horrid excuse for a parking lot sitting in front of the building. I use all of this as an example, I am sure that most of the schools in the Avalon region are in the same predicament. The provincial government recently stated that the children are our future, but they are not doing anything to assist in the prosperity of that future. Urban sprawl and an inability to manage social resources will be the downfall of Newfoundland and Labrador, in a future where prosperity and economic stability are touted as being sure things, unless something si done to correct these growing mistakes. The municipal, provincial and federal governments need to acknowledge these issues in Newfoundland, and other parts of the country, before Canada takes the turn into the same pitfalls that currently entrench the U.S.

  • Mark
    July 01, 2010 - 19:55

    Dave from NL are you saying two degrees means the same number of people (same population) are buying these new homes but keeping their old ones ? That seems wasteful if there is no one to occupy them, unless they are, which means the old homes are abandoned and those people with two degrees are creating slums. Sorry Dave, I'll go with Jon from St. John's, NL's answer since it has more common sense and is not ridden with poor spelling and grammar like yours is - from a person with two degrees. (Where do these people come from ?)

  • Mike
    July 01, 2010 - 19:46

    What kind of Jobs do these people have to afford a $250 000 home? And most of these homes need work. Do they not have furniture?

  • Mark
    July 01, 2010 - 19:46

    Where are these people coming from ? Or are there that many abandoned old homes around the city as people buy new ones ? Are we creating slums ?