Keeping up with OHS

Employers in Newfoundland and Labrador’s natural resources sectors — mining, oil, energy — are experiencing a steady run of large capital projects that are driving the provincial economy to become one of the top performers in the country. They are doing so with a strong safety record, according to the companies involved and the regulators. That said, the boom times are putting new pressures on employers and workers alike. And while safety is a touchstone for many, it can also easily fall to the wayside without: a proven commitment by workers to continuously follow occupational health and safety regulations, a commitment by employers to provide the required supervision and work environment, and a commitment by government to fund the regulatory agencies tasked with ensuring safe workplaces. To that, The Telegram is taking a closer look at some standing OHS issues and why safety remains, even in the best of times, everyone’s responsibility.

Keeping up with OHS
Most recent comment
Maralea Chapin
- June 27, 2016
- 19 h 00

The FSSA office in Kokomo, Indiana is a very difficult one to get into when you have to walk with a walker. There was another lady leaving when I was at the door to go in, and she also made a comment on how hard it was to go in and out. The parking spaces are across the street from the business. There a few in front of the office, but they are always full. Is there anything that can be done to have it easily accessible? Maralea Chapin

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