Men think too much

Karla Hayward
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

Theatre

"Men think too much." Maybe that's not something you hear said often when it comes to relationships. But, in the case of Bryan Hennessey's new one-act comedy, "Karma," it's the God's honest truth.

"Karma," according to the writer/director, is "a very simple story." It's basically a young man and a young woman in their 20s. She's a little younger than he. They're involved in this relationship that is very puzzling to him. He finds it very difficult to deal with because he has some ideas in his head about what a relationship should be. He's struggling with spiritual issues, religious issues, that he can't reconcile with his real life, whereas the young woman has a much clearer idea of what their relationship is, and what it could be."

Monica Walsh and Philip Goodridge star in the play "Karma," about love, sex, alcohol and religion. Photo by Keith Goose/The Telegram

"Men think too much." Maybe that's not something you hear said often when it comes to relationships. But, in the case of Bryan Hennessey's new one-act comedy, "Karma," it's the God's honest truth.

"Karma," according to the writer/director, is "a very simple story." It's basically a young man and a young woman in their 20s. She's a little younger than he. They're involved in this relationship that is very puzzling to him. He finds it very difficult to deal with because he has some ideas in his head about what a relationship should be. He's struggling with spiritual issues, religious issues, that he can't reconcile with his real life, whereas the young woman has a much clearer idea of what their relationship is, and what it could be."

Hennessey elaborates by saying the play delves into that age-old quandary between men and women: what do they want from each other.

"It's not a new question," he says, "but it's always fascinating to explore the subject."

In fact, he continues, "That's really my only concern in writing anything. What goes on between men and women? What is it about relationships? How come both partners in a relationship usually have such different ideas about what's going on?"

"In the case of our two young lovers, played by Phil Goodridge and Monica Walsh, they're hashing out the ins-and-outs of their relationship from ground zero itself; their bed.

It's between the sheets that these two explore why exactly it's a issue - for him - that "all they do" is have fun, drink alcohol and have sex. She just doesn't see the problem.

Origins

Hennessey says "Karma" is loosely "based on a story from my book of short stories, 'Waking Up in the City of Dreams.' That's where the inspiration came from; it's not a literal transcription of the story ... I tend to think of those stories sometimes as raw materials. It's like the dramatic incarnation of a demo record."

He goes on to cite a Bob Dylan interview he read in Rolling Stone in which Dylan explained how he viewed his recordings as raw materials for his live performances; a starting place to see where else they could go.

"And I thought that's a good idea. You don't have to slavishly follow your previous pattern; you can make something else out of it. Which is not to say that I'm just recycling old material! It's a jumping off point. There's an idea in there that I can go forward with."

What goes around comes around

Of his main characters and their karmic pursuits, Hennessey says, "He is working really hard, too hard, to become a spiritually realized being. She, on the other hand, is already a fully realized, spiritual being. And she's arrived at it, completely instinctively, intuitively, without having to think about it much at all."

But Hennessey is quick to note that while "this all sounds very serious, it's not. It's quite funny. He takes himself a bit too seriously, and she doesn't take anything seriously. There are certainly a few laughs involved."

And, he thinks the audience will certainly sympathize with his characters' story, "I think there will be people who 'recognize' each of these characters instantly and know exactly where they're coming from. They'll think 'I've been through that, or I know someone who has.'"

And as to that ah-ha moment? Hennessey says there is a resolution ... kind of.

"It does end up at a point where they, with out stating it, arrive at the same place ... What is her karma, what is his karma, is it possible both their karma is the same?

See "Karma" on stage at Rabbittown Theatre (Merrymeeting Road & Linscott Street) Tuesday to Saturday. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 general/$12 students and seniors.

Organizations: Rolling Stone, Rabbittown Theatre

Geographic location: Dreams, Linscott Street

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments