'I taught guitar lessons after rocket attacks'

Aaron
Aaron Beswick
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Roddickton soldier releasing CD next month

Cpl. Elton Adams' body and mind are making an 80-degree adjustment. From 60 C Afghanistan, the Roddickton native has returned to -20 C Halifax with a new plan.

"I taught guitar lessons after rocket attacks with my little beat-up acoustic guitar," Adams remembered of his seven months recently spent mentoring Afghani police in Zhari district.

Cpl. Elton Adams (left) played with Blue Rodeo when the Canadian band performed for him and his fellow troops serving in Afghanistan. Here, he is pictured with Blue Rodeo lead singer Jim Cuddy. - Submitted photo

Cpl. Elton Adams' body and mind are making an 80-degree adjustment. From 60 C Afghanistan, the Roddickton native has returned to -20 C Halifax with a new plan.

"I taught guitar lessons after rocket attacks with my little beat-up acoustic guitar," Adams remembered of his seven months recently spent mentoring Afghani police in Zhari district.

"Ninety per cent of my songs were written overseas - even the fun songs were a de-stresser."

Adams' self-titled album is produced by East Coast Music Awards judge Dennis Field for Denmark Productions. The album will be released in the United Kingdom and worldwide on March 23.

Since returning from Afghanistan, the songs conjured at an Afghan outpost have swept him off his feet. It started when he was invited to play his tune, "What A Soldier Left Behind," with Blue Rodeo for the troops.

The performance was posted on YouTube and MySpace, along with his other songs, and he's now had thousands of viewers.

"I've been getting so many e-mails from the families and spouses of soldiers serving overseas," said Adams.

"My album is an emotional roller-coaster. It's all written from the heart, like reading a book or telling a story."

Having spent seven months living in a sea container "in the middle of nowhere" with nine Canadian soldiers and nine Afghan police officers, his songs are ringing true with the thousands who have served.

"We had to take care of ourselves while mentoring the Afghans to teach them to be a better police force. You teach them how to conduct vehicle searches and roadblocks, but out there in the police there is a substantial twist of army - they also need to know how to fight for their lives," said Adams. "I've been rocketed, shot at and mortared - physically, I'm OK."

Adams' brother, Sheridan, flew to Halifax from Alberta to play piano on the album.

The songs range from rock and roll to blues, telling of young Stanley Cup dreams to a man's longing for his woman.

"Spouses are the backbone to every great soldier - I spent a lot of time thinking about my beautiful wife Trudy while I was over there," Adams said.

Music was everywhere growing up in the home of Enos and Mary Adams in Roddickton. They played at the Apostolic Faith Church and for each other.

"Christmastime in my house was like the Grand Old Opry - everyone from the oldest grandparent to the youngest cousin would be playing."

Through war and back, that Roddickton musical tradition is hitting the airwaves. Those wanting to hear Adams' music can visit his website at www.eltonadams.com.

Organizations: C Halifax, Apostolic Faith Church

Geographic location: Roddickton, United Kingdom, Afghanistan Halifax Alberta

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  • Alex
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    Way to go Elton! Your CD is awesome, hit after hit. I play it in my car all the time!!

  • Alex
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    Way to go Elton! Your CD is awesome, hit after hit. I play it in my car all the time!!