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  • NL
    July 02, 2010 - 13:34

    I feel for those who feel discriminated against. As a regular donor, I understand wanting to donate blood and it would be disappointing to be rejected. I agree that heterosexual individuals also have a great risk of spreading HIV/AIDS. Perhaps the policy is outdated. The testing procedures seem sound to me however. The questions asked are thorough and they assure you will be contacted if any need should arise. I suppose there is the risk that one may not be honest in their questionnaire and that would pose a risk as well. Perhaps Canadian Blood Services is naïve in the assumption that everyone is a do-gooder. As well, as someone receiving blood, perhaps they agree with the anti-gay policy. First and foremost, health and safety comes first. No one can argue with that. Where there is risk, wherever and whoever it may be, health and safety must not be ignored.

  • Funky
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    If you truly want to consider someone equal in our society, you have to give them equality on all grounds.

    This is 2009 and not 1989. I thought we would be further along then this. Everyone is at risk for HIV/AIDS today and this is pure discrimination against one group of people. A gay couple which have only been with each other their whole lives cannot donate blood, but a heterosexual male or female that has been with multiple partners throughout their lives only have to answer a few simple questions. Great screening process there.

    Create a proper screening and testing procedures for all blood.

    Susan Gilliver's quote at the end of the story summarizes the common sense perfectly. Common sense is so rare these days it seems to be becoming a superpower.

  • Joseph
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    so how did he contribute? he never. someone else did how stupid is that

  • Esron
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    Hmm, it's funny that they never posted my original comment, considering it's the truth. Hypocrisy much?!

  • Steve
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    Jillian Brown looks like Alanis Morrisette.

  • Michelle
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    With all the advances of equality, I am shocked to find out that gay men can't donate blood. Wow is all I can say.

  • Here we
    July 02, 2010 - 13:21

    I wonder if the Canadian Blood Service came out with this line since they are not able to properly test in the first place. If they were able to properly test, it really would not matter since the tests would screen out any bad blood right from the start.

    Looks like they still have issues even with the new name. Kinda like the cancer testing, they just can not get it right and need to put blame on someone else.

    Red Cross = Canadian Blood Service Did they not learn from the last few flubs. HIV, HEP C? Test it properly and they could take donations from anyone. Fail to test, then pick and choose I guess. Your name ay have changed by you legacy continues to haunt people you have harmed.

  • McLovin
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    They say 'Oh well, gay people don't know what their partners are doing,' and the fact of the matter is, it doesn't matter who you sleep with, you don't always know what your partners are doing, she said. It's just ridiculous to assume one group is more trustworthy than another

    Who is They? Canadian Blood Services is not saying this. Their reason for not accepting blood from Gay males is good enough for me and I support them 100%. Facts are facts, gay males contract the HIV Virus at a greater rate than any other group.

    I have absolutely no problems with how people live their lives. I'm certainly nobody to judge in any case but just because you live your life in a different way than most people do, that does not give you the right to dictate how the rest of us live ours. Especially when it jeopardizes the health of the population.

  • Henry
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    Who are these people to, think that other people should be put at risks just so they can say they have equal rights. This is a no brainer. I don't think this is a gay issue, I think is an issue of some people are going to complaint, whatever the issue or circumstance.

    The safety of the general population should take priority over the rights of gays of any other group


    PS. I'm not against gays or any other group, I just want to feel safe.

  • Rosann
    July 02, 2010 - 13:14

    I agree with McLovin from NL.... I have absolutely no issues with the gay population; however I do have concerns with letting a high risk population donate blood which is intended to assist those in need of healthy blood. We should be concentrating on research with the intent of improving the testing capabilities. The current two week window whereby HIV etc is not picked up through normal testing is what we need to perfect... it really has little to do with the gays in our society, it really has to do with the high risk population which just happens to be gay. Think of those on the receiving end of the donated blood..... when they receive this blood to make them better, they don't want to be subjected to the high risk of HIV, etc.
    Being a gay man in society and how you live your life is a whole different issue... but if the statistics show this is a high risk group, then we have to accept this... it is not meant to assume or indicate all gay men have multiple partners.

  • Edward
    July 02, 2010 - 13:13

    Asolutely incredible that this policy is in place.

    I am an openly gay man and went to donate blood in Toronto about a decade ago and was screened out because I was gay.

    I walked away thinking that the whole blood collection system depended on how I answered the question Are you gay. I could have easily gone to another blood collection site, said I was divorced with three kids (that is not the case), and I would have been screened as OK.

    I once volunteered on a safe sex phone line in Toronto giving out info on safe sex practices. One evening a married straight man called and said that he had been on a conference out of town and had unprotected sex during fling with a woman.

    He was returning home to his wife who didn't know about the fling, and he wanted to know if he should have sex with his wife without using a condom.

    Well duh, the answer is NOOOOO ! He should wait for 13 weeks and then get tested for HIV.

    If thought, if he went to a blood collection and was asked if he was gay, his answer would be No and he would be screend as OK. Make any sense?

  • Esron
    July 02, 2010 - 13:11

    Who is They? Canadian Blood Services is not saying this. Their reason for not accepting blood from Gay males is good enough for me and I support them 100%. Facts are facts, gay males contract the HIV Virus at a greater rate than any other group.

    Fine, if you want to look at it that way:
    Let's stop accepting blood from blacks...Hey, they might be from Africa, and we know what AIDS is doing over there...

    Stop accepting blood from Asians... because they might be Chinese, and their HIV levels are skyrocketing.

    Stop accepting blood from people with a really dark tan... because they might be from India, and their HIV levels, too, are skyrocketing.

    Now, if it was proposed to ban any of the groups above, there would be outrage (and understandably so) so why target a group just because they love differently!? Hmm?

  • Jody
    July 02, 2010 - 13:10

    The two-week window is not applicable to the screening process as such. For any increased risks such as tattoos, piercings, new sex partners, etcetera there are timeframes in place where you are not permitted to give blood. For example: if a heterosexual person has a new partner, they must wait one year before giving blood. Thus, a double standard exists because gay men are not permitted to give blood at all, ever, but heterosexuals can change partners multiple times over the course of a life time and still be permitted to donate blood after the one year period!!

  • McLovin
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    If you want to come on here and question Canadian Blood Services testing procedures that's a completely different issue than the theme that's being protrayed in this news story. I think it's very unfair to criticize CBS for discriminating against gay males when they are only looking out for the majority of the population. They've admitted that they have a flaw in their testing procedure and I for one am glad that they are taking precautions to ensure that potential threats are screened out. And I would be willing to bet that gay males are not the only group of people who are not allowed to donate!!

  • Francine
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    This has got to be one of the craziest posts I have ever read. It's not the gay person donating blood, it's their friend. The blood is coming from THEIR vain's not the gays. I have nothing against gay people but this is nuts.

  • NL
    July 01, 2010 - 20:24

    I feel for those who feel discriminated against. As a regular donor, I understand wanting to donate blood and it would be disappointing to be rejected. I agree that heterosexual individuals also have a great risk of spreading HIV/AIDS. Perhaps the policy is outdated. The testing procedures seem sound to me however. The questions asked are thorough and they assure you will be contacted if any need should arise. I suppose there is the risk that one may not be honest in their questionnaire and that would pose a risk as well. Perhaps Canadian Blood Services is naïve in the assumption that everyone is a do-gooder. As well, as someone receiving blood, perhaps they agree with the anti-gay policy. First and foremost, health and safety comes first. No one can argue with that. Where there is risk, wherever and whoever it may be, health and safety must not be ignored.

  • Funky
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    If you truly want to consider someone equal in our society, you have to give them equality on all grounds.

    This is 2009 and not 1989. I thought we would be further along then this. Everyone is at risk for HIV/AIDS today and this is pure discrimination against one group of people. A gay couple which have only been with each other their whole lives cannot donate blood, but a heterosexual male or female that has been with multiple partners throughout their lives only have to answer a few simple questions. Great screening process there.

    Create a proper screening and testing procedures for all blood.

    Susan Gilliver's quote at the end of the story summarizes the common sense perfectly. Common sense is so rare these days it seems to be becoming a superpower.

  • Joseph
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    so how did he contribute? he never. someone else did how stupid is that

  • Esron
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    Hmm, it's funny that they never posted my original comment, considering it's the truth. Hypocrisy much?!

  • Steve
    July 01, 2010 - 20:18

    Jillian Brown looks like Alanis Morrisette.

  • Michelle
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    With all the advances of equality, I am shocked to find out that gay men can't donate blood. Wow is all I can say.

  • Here we
    July 01, 2010 - 20:05

    I wonder if the Canadian Blood Service came out with this line since they are not able to properly test in the first place. If they were able to properly test, it really would not matter since the tests would screen out any bad blood right from the start.

    Looks like they still have issues even with the new name. Kinda like the cancer testing, they just can not get it right and need to put blame on someone else.

    Red Cross = Canadian Blood Service Did they not learn from the last few flubs. HIV, HEP C? Test it properly and they could take donations from anyone. Fail to test, then pick and choose I guess. Your name ay have changed by you legacy continues to haunt people you have harmed.

  • McLovin
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    They say 'Oh well, gay people don't know what their partners are doing,' and the fact of the matter is, it doesn't matter who you sleep with, you don't always know what your partners are doing, she said. It's just ridiculous to assume one group is more trustworthy than another

    Who is They? Canadian Blood Services is not saying this. Their reason for not accepting blood from Gay males is good enough for me and I support them 100%. Facts are facts, gay males contract the HIV Virus at a greater rate than any other group.

    I have absolutely no problems with how people live their lives. I'm certainly nobody to judge in any case but just because you live your life in a different way than most people do, that does not give you the right to dictate how the rest of us live ours. Especially when it jeopardizes the health of the population.

  • Henry
    July 01, 2010 - 19:54

    Who are these people to, think that other people should be put at risks just so they can say they have equal rights. This is a no brainer. I don't think this is a gay issue, I think is an issue of some people are going to complaint, whatever the issue or circumstance.

    The safety of the general population should take priority over the rights of gays of any other group


    PS. I'm not against gays or any other group, I just want to feel safe.

  • Rosann
    July 01, 2010 - 19:53

    I agree with McLovin from NL.... I have absolutely no issues with the gay population; however I do have concerns with letting a high risk population donate blood which is intended to assist those in need of healthy blood. We should be concentrating on research with the intent of improving the testing capabilities. The current two week window whereby HIV etc is not picked up through normal testing is what we need to perfect... it really has little to do with the gays in our society, it really has to do with the high risk population which just happens to be gay. Think of those on the receiving end of the donated blood..... when they receive this blood to make them better, they don't want to be subjected to the high risk of HIV, etc.
    Being a gay man in society and how you live your life is a whole different issue... but if the statistics show this is a high risk group, then we have to accept this... it is not meant to assume or indicate all gay men have multiple partners.

  • Edward
    July 01, 2010 - 19:51

    Asolutely incredible that this policy is in place.

    I am an openly gay man and went to donate blood in Toronto about a decade ago and was screened out because I was gay.

    I walked away thinking that the whole blood collection system depended on how I answered the question Are you gay. I could have easily gone to another blood collection site, said I was divorced with three kids (that is not the case), and I would have been screened as OK.

    I once volunteered on a safe sex phone line in Toronto giving out info on safe sex practices. One evening a married straight man called and said that he had been on a conference out of town and had unprotected sex during fling with a woman.

    He was returning home to his wife who didn't know about the fling, and he wanted to know if he should have sex with his wife without using a condom.

    Well duh, the answer is NOOOOO ! He should wait for 13 weeks and then get tested for HIV.

    If thought, if he went to a blood collection and was asked if he was gay, his answer would be No and he would be screend as OK. Make any sense?

  • Esron
    July 01, 2010 - 19:48

    Who is They? Canadian Blood Services is not saying this. Their reason for not accepting blood from Gay males is good enough for me and I support them 100%. Facts are facts, gay males contract the HIV Virus at a greater rate than any other group.

    Fine, if you want to look at it that way:
    Let's stop accepting blood from blacks...Hey, they might be from Africa, and we know what AIDS is doing over there...

    Stop accepting blood from Asians... because they might be Chinese, and their HIV levels are skyrocketing.

    Stop accepting blood from people with a really dark tan... because they might be from India, and their HIV levels, too, are skyrocketing.

    Now, if it was proposed to ban any of the groups above, there would be outrage (and understandably so) so why target a group just because they love differently!? Hmm?

  • Jody
    July 01, 2010 - 19:46

    The two-week window is not applicable to the screening process as such. For any increased risks such as tattoos, piercings, new sex partners, etcetera there are timeframes in place where you are not permitted to give blood. For example: if a heterosexual person has a new partner, they must wait one year before giving blood. Thus, a double standard exists because gay men are not permitted to give blood at all, ever, but heterosexuals can change partners multiple times over the course of a life time and still be permitted to donate blood after the one year period!!

  • McLovin
    July 01, 2010 - 19:44

    If you want to come on here and question Canadian Blood Services testing procedures that's a completely different issue than the theme that's being protrayed in this news story. I think it's very unfair to criticize CBS for discriminating against gay males when they are only looking out for the majority of the population. They've admitted that they have a flaw in their testing procedure and I for one am glad that they are taking precautions to ensure that potential threats are screened out. And I would be willing to bet that gay males are not the only group of people who are not allowed to donate!!

  • Francine
    July 01, 2010 - 19:44

    This has got to be one of the craziest posts I have ever read. It's not the gay person donating blood, it's their friend. The blood is coming from THEIR vain's not the gays. I have nothing against gay people but this is nuts.