Early recommendation by Wells Inquiry accepted by offshore board

Staff ~ The Telegram
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An early recommendation by the Wells inquiry has reduced search and rescue response times for the offshore industry to 15-20 minutes.
That's down from the current one-hour wheels-up time - the time it takes to get a rescue helicopter airborne.
Inquiry commissioner Robert Wells recommended a dedicated search and rescue (SAR) helicopter, equipped and ready to go from St. John's.
Those recommendations have been accepted by the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (CNLOPB) - and the offshore oil industry must tell the regulatory board no later than Feb. 19 how that will be done.
Cougar Helicopters is contracted by the offshore oil industry to provide first-response search and rescue services.
In the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, where Cougar also provides SAR services, its response time is 20 minutes.
Wells recommendations will also end night flights offshore - at least until a dedicated SAR helicopter is equipped with auto-hover that allows the aircraft to rescue people from the water at night using a hoist.
As of Feb. 14, night flight offshore will only occur in emergencies.

Organizations: Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

Geographic location: St. John's, U.S. Gulf of Mexico

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Recent comments

  • Saucy Face
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    No dount the mayor of Gander has gone of his nut over this.

  • Nasty
    July 02, 2010 - 13:17

    Well guess that will cost everyone another chopper. Only four in St. Johns now, and with that kinda service they will need a dedicated bird, no way around it. Wonder how long it will take before this will happen though.

  • Saucy Face
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    No dount the mayor of Gander has gone of his nut over this.

  • Nasty
    July 01, 2010 - 19:57

    Well guess that will cost everyone another chopper. Only four in St. Johns now, and with that kinda service they will need a dedicated bird, no way around it. Wonder how long it will take before this will happen though.