Remand prisoner makes plea for psychiatric overhaul

Barb
Barb Sweet
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

Says prisoners' cases not getting thorough review

David Anthony Tobin is affable, well-spoken and a self-confessed con man.

He has a lettered tattoo on his arm, but he appears neither menacing nor extraordinary.

If you relied on appearances to typecast him, he could be your plumber or your lawyer, depending on his clothing and the setting.

But he's neither. He's in Her Majesty's Penitentiary on remand for drug trafficking charges.

David Anthony Tobin, 32, at Her Majesty's Penitentiary in St. John's. - Photo by Barb Sweet/The Telegram

David Anthony Tobin is affable, well-spoken and a self-confessed con man.

He has a lettered tattoo on his arm, but he appears neither menacing nor extraordinary.

If you relied on appearances to typecast him, he could be your plumber or your lawyer, depending on his clothing and the setting.

But he's neither. He's in Her Majesty's Penitentiary on remand for drug trafficking charges.

He has a criminal record that includes jail time for possession and dangerous operation of a vehicle.

In short, 32-year-old Tobin is no saint.

The trafficking charge has yet to be dealt with in court and stems from a highly publicized drug bust this winter.

On this day at the Pen, he wants the public to hear his plea on behalf of himself and other prisoners with mental illnesses.

His is a familiar complaint - it's been lobbed at prison psychiatrist Dr. David Craig by other prisoners over the years, and was noted in a report on the provincial corrections system, Decades of Darkness: Moving Towards the Light.

Tobin insists the system is doing prisoners an injustice by taking them off their prescription medications when they see Craig at the Pen and that their medical history isn't being given its due.

"He just rushes you through. He thinks he's cleaning us up. He believes everybody in here is a drug addict," Tobin says.

He understands the public may not find him to be the most credible of advocates.

"What does the public want? Does the public want me released with my mind all out of whack, restless and unfocused and not feeling my best? If the public will agree with Dr. Craig, no sweat," he says.

Tobin said some prisoners have severe conditions, but he isn't one of them.

He was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) when he was a kid, and still suffers from the adult version.

At 16, he defied his parents, Jean and Jim, when they wanted to move the family back to St. John's after transferring to Ottawa. He had stopped taking his Ritalin.

"I wasn't having it, no way. 'I'm staying here. You're not taking me from my friends and my life,' he recalls.

"If I had listened to them I wouldn't have been in this mess. I stayed there. I manipulated my way into getting on the student social assistance. I was a good con man. 'My parents are moving to Newfoundland. They are uprooting me from this and that and whatever,' and (the authorities) believed me. I had a doctor agree with me, crying to my psychiatrist, 'Oh, my family is so bad to me.' I lied to them. My family was great to me."

By the time he was in his twenties, Tobin says he was into cocaine and had to get his father to come to Niagara Falls to bail him out. In return, he had to agree to come back to Newfoundland.

"I got involved in trafficking - well, I was accused of trafficking. I got involved in a high-speed chase with the police and I got additional time for that. The cops thought I was trafficking," he says.

Tobin says the more he "grows up," the more he realizes he screwed up his life.

But he claims he did start to put his life back on track. He met his girlfriend, moved back to Ottawa and says the pair got cleaned up from drugs. He had two jobs going, as a car salesman with a travelling auction, and construction work.

In early March, however, he and his girlfriend were charged after the bust in St. John's and Tobin was denied bail.

Officers got a search warrant and seized a kilogram of cocaine, 5,000 ecstasy pills, hash oil, money and drug paraphernalia at a St. John's home. The drugs, money and equipment were put on display in a media splash.

Tobin intends to plead not guilty to the charge.

As he poses in front of the cells at Her Majesty's Penitentiary, Tobin quips, "Mom would be proud now."

His parents aren't pleased, to say the least.

But Jean Tobin says she still loves her son to death.

"He's told a good many lies in his day. He can talk the talk," she says of the story he gave the Ontario authorities as a teen.

But she also remembers him doing OK on Ritalin until he stopped taking it and wanting to be around people like him.

"The big problem here is that mental health - I think, and most people agree with me - mental health and criminal activity go hand in hand," Tobin says.

He said he tried to get Craig to listen to his case, but the doctor put him on another drug, an antidepressant that made him aggressive and didn't treat his condition.

"If I was trafficking in (Ritalin), I would understand why they took it away from me. I took those faithfully every day," said Tobin.

"Why would he want to give me something that would make me feel aggressive and violent? Ritalin calms you, give you focus and takes away that restless feeling you get."

Tobin blames the wrong treatment for hampering his ability to focus on his court case.

"I am looking at a lot of years in jail. I'm not guilty but I may be found guilty. I need my medication to go over my disclosure to try to help my lawyer with my case," he says.

Tobin says if he is eventually released, it will take him awhile to readjust, and that's the same for any inmate who's been off their proper medication.

"I have a good family and I have people I can deal with. I would rather not, but I can deal with it for a couple months until I get my balance back. A lot of the guys in here don't have that kind of support," he says.

"They are going to get out with no medication, nothing - no help."

Tobin says he feels Craig is trying to punish prisoners, not help them.

"My personal opinion on him is he wants us here. ... We are criminal. We don't deserve a chance. He doesn't want us better. He has a 'one strike and you are out' policy," Tobin says.

"Nothing will help fast enough to help me personally. But six months from now, a year from now, maybe the inmates that come here will not be treated as drug addicts and nothing but drug seekers."

But at the same time Tobin expresses hope for a clean future, he worries about again having to combat his condition and about finding and keeping a job.

Craig has refused interview requests,

During a comprehensive review of the province's prisons, nearly half of the inmates interviewed brought up his treatment methods.

"Dr. Craig is known for his conservative approach to prescribing medications, and soon after he began work at the prisons, he started cutting back on prescribed medications to inmates," the review stated.

"He felt that some medications were inappropriate as he observed that most inmates had substance-use disorders and/or personality disorders and were not otherwise mentally ill."

The review also noted that "not all professionals agree with Dr. Craig's approach."

bsweet@thetelegram.com

Geographic location: St. John's, Ottawa, Newfoundland Niagara Falls Ontario

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • me
    March 20, 2013 - 12:35

    I'ts funny when I was In stephenville Pen. I was on medication for depression and when i seen Dr. Craig he said he suspected I had adhd and prescribed me welbutrin then later upgraded to ritilan. wierd i found because he hauls everyone of their meds I must be really f'd up!!!

  • Grandma
    July 02, 2010 - 13:34

    Did Ritalin keep him from criminal activity? Will it do so in the future? Not all who suffer from ADHD are involved in crime, most are productive citizens. The choices were made by Mr. Tobin not by the condition. Look inward sir, take responsibility for your actions. With or without Ritalin, only you can change your future. God bless and guide you.

  • Politically Incorrect
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    Stand back and watch the sanctimonious, morally superior, self-proclaimed criminological experts parade in with their nonsense hyperbole.

  • Merry Go
    July 02, 2010 - 13:31

    Which comes first the chivken or teh egg? or shall I say what is made first the criminal or the druggie? br br From my amateur eyes, maybe drugs are too easily prescribed on the outside making drug addicts out of people who then turn to crime. Maybe Craig is right.

  • Wasteatime
    July 02, 2010 - 13:27

    Get a few outside mental health professionals to review his cases. If what he's prescribing is causing more problems than it should be, then find another physician. br br In terms of the guy in the article, there are plenty of non-stimulant medications to treat his condition. Certainly ex-cons or people in prison shouldn't be given drugs that are known to cause aggression. br br I'm not sure I have a lot of sympathy for his drug case, but it does sound like a lot of people have complained about the doctor at the Penn. Time for his employer to do some investigating.

  • Sue
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    This is absolutely ridicules. Of course, we know you get special treatment if you are a criminal! Just complain and someone will assist you. Make your living accommodations a little more bearable while doing your time. Are you telling me I should commit some crime and get incarcerated before I am able to receive proper mental care. I am a single mom who was diagnosed with bi-polar only 4 years ago. (Dr. Craig also tried to accurately diagnose me years ago to no avail) It was hard enough to find a psychiatrist for my care but now my daughter is showing symptoms of the same and the Janeway is telling me there is a 6-8 month wait list to see a counselor (let alone a psychiatrist) at their Family Care Unit. I bet there will be enough dust kicked up about prisoners that they get the care they are looking for. Lets take care of our families first!

  • Over the Rainbow
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    It is called jail because they don't want you to come back. It is not a hotel.

  • Frank M
    July 02, 2010 - 13:23

    According to the article, prisoners at the penitentiary are not allowed to take their anti-psychotic medications.

    Does this policy hold as well for inmates on high blood pressure medication?

    They should have their medically necessary drugs provided to them in a controlled way and administered by a nurse or some other professional approved by the corrections administration.

    It would better to have people leave the penitentiary in a controlled and balanced state of mind.

    That being said, this guy's criminal activities are not always a result of being off his meds. No way.

    Just because you are off medications does not mean you plan and conduct ongoing illegal activity like trafficking illegal drugs.

    Don't do the crime if you don't want to do the time.

  • Kayla
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    'He has a lettered tattoo on his arm, but he appears neither menacing nor extraordinary.'

    What are you trying to say here?

  • Jimmy Mac
    July 02, 2010 - 13:21

    It's all about blame and excuses without taking personal responsibility. Bottom line, this guy is a career criminal who had as many chances in life as anyone else but decided he didn't like the working life style. He is a habitual low life who has nothing but a life time of prison to look forward to.

  • Polly
    July 02, 2010 - 13:21

    This is an excerpt from an article in the Telegram , dated April , 18, 2008 -----An independent review of adult corrections has been initiated by the provincial government with a goal of improving the safety and security of employees and inmates of Her Majestys Penitentiary (HMP) in St. Johns and other correctional facilities in the province. br The review will take into consideration policies, procedures and administration including the working and living conditions at HMP and other facilities. br The improvement of our corrections operations is not solely focused upon the construction of a new penitentiary, Justice Minister Jerome Kennedy said. It is about providing a safe environment for both our corrections staff and those in our custody. This issue is about more than just bricks and mortar. Minister Kennedy has long since moved on , the problems remain .

  • amazed
    July 02, 2010 - 13:21

    Ritalin is very popular on the street, people buy them, crush them and snort them. It is a good medication that is abused by substance abusers.
    I suspect people are removed from drugs by the Doctor at the pen to see how they actually are while off the medications, what symptoms they exhibit, so you can get an accurate assessment of what is actually wrong with them, and then treat accordingly. People who abuse drugs have symptoms that come from the abuse of the drug, not any psychiatric disorder. Bottom line, the guy has substance abuse issues that are probably the source of his problems. I'll take a psychiatrist's word over anyone else saying his current drug causes anger issues. Not getting the drug they want can cause anger issues too.

  • R
    July 02, 2010 - 13:20

    Ritalin is not the only drug of choice for a person with ADHD....therefore, he doesn't need to be treated with a drug that he can abuse. Secondly, a person is put in jail to reform from what they've done....if that means that a poorly monitored/treated mental illness could be rectified through the proper treatment, which they are not getting from Dr. Craig....then I would rather they get it. As for waitlists for family psychiatry programs that is unfortunate and my child is going through the same, but I think that a prisoners reform has just as much merit to our safe society once they are let out of prison to our children as getting help for our children who one day may be put in the same situation....you'll never know what path your child may take or mistakes they will do...ALL PSYCHIATRY FROM PRISON TO REGULAR SERVICES GIVEN TO CHILDREN AND ADULTS NEED TO BE OVERHAULED FROM THE BUILDINGS TO THE SO CALLED PROFESSIONALS PROVIDING CARE TO THESE PATIENTS....so it is not anyones fault but the goverments not alotting enough money for these programs.

  • Bill
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    I think this is ridiculous. I am a person who has worked with people with neurological deficits for nearly twenty-five years. This inmate deserves more than one opinion. I have come across more than one educator and professional who themselves had obsessive compulsive tendencies and went too far the other way in being against medications. When you traffic in it they are drugs. When you take them they are medications. I have heard many experts refer to these medications as wheelchairs for the mind. With a properly diagnosed case it is no different than taking away medications for diabetes. These medications can be given under strict supervision. Many well know professionals who are involved in studies now say ADHD is defined wrong, it is not that the person can't pay attention, it is that they are paying attention to too many things at one time thus the important thing is getting the attention it deserves by that individual. Many have more than one disorder so the case becomes complex with the co-morbidity. In Mr. Tobin's case if he also has some OCD behaviours he maybe be obsessing about not being treated as what he believes as being fair treatment and this manifests into other behavioural issues. The biggest problem at times is that professionals themselves feel they understand it, draw conclusions on insufficient information and everybody believes them because they are professionals . Our prison system needs people who are new a fresh and don't get caught up in the system of Oh here comes another one put an honest effort into figuring out why people are actually there in some cases it is because they didn't get the right treatment when young and it is rarely the Parents fault but they're made feel guilty. I repeat, wheel chairs for the mind . Are you listening?

  • K
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    Simple Solution to the prisoners IF YOU DIDNT DO IT - YOU WOULD NOT BE THERE br And you would of never meet Dr. Craigs

  • L
    July 02, 2010 - 13:12

    It's always the same stories coming from the Pen. Drug addictions and poorly managed mental illnesses. Mr. Fitzpatrick from Turnings, I'm sure, is tired of pleading for help for these people. When will someone finally listen to what's going on here??

  • give me a break
    July 02, 2010 - 13:12

    Excuse me if I don't exactly feel sorry for this guy.

    He was (allegedly) nabbed with drugs, drug paraphenalia and money from the sale of same, but he intends to plead not guilty for trafficking. Tobin admitted he is a manipulator and a con man, so how can anybody believe him? How many lives has he played a part in destroying?

    People like Tobin make my skin crawl.

  • CAD Sufferer
    July 02, 2010 - 13:11

    Even though some people may not take what this man is saying because he is a criminal seriously, I think they should. I was a patient at the HSC and had the unforunate opportunity to be assessed by Dr Craig..boy was he wrong! Dr Criag has his own ways of doing things and everyone else is wrong in his view.

  • Joey
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    it's not about feeling sorry for them. How can you expect them to behave rationally if they're not allowed to have medication prescribed to them by a psychiatrist? Dope them up as much as possible, I say.

  • nathan
    July 02, 2010 - 13:08

    What about what they call Case Conferencing - where a number of psychiatrists, psychologists and other specialists meet group-style with the client? the client is asked many questions and his/her history and medications are discussed and then the specialists go off and brainstorm to come up with a proper diagnosis and treatment. Wouldn't this be more effective than the mutually exclusive stylings of (Dr.) David Craig?

  • Bishop
    July 02, 2010 - 13:08

    I am David Tobin's Girlfriend, and first hand I can say while David was medicated, he lived a normal life, held down a good job, and fit in with society in a normal matter. A person can not say that because he was caught in a situation where drugs were seized that he don't deserve to be medicated for a condition that he has been diagnosed with since childhood, by several doctors. No one knows if he is guilty or not guilty, and in this situation he is pleading not guilty for a reason. Is it not a matter of innocent until proven guilty, or is it that people assume guilt, therefore you are guilty. Regardless of any of that, David was taken off his meds and placed on medication by Dr.Craig that causes high aggression, so as a citizen of today's society, that's what your agreeing with, for people in jail to be released into your society on medications that make them highly aggressive. Then what more do you expect from a person than to turn to criminal activity once again. Not everyone abuses there mental instability for a way to obtain drugs so they can abuse them for the wrong reasons. David is a good man, with a good out look on life, all he wants is the chance to live that life normal, to again hold down a good job, and be a part of society. and who is anyone to judge that. Not everyone is perfect, but everyone do deserve a chance. As long as these inmates are wrongfully treated and diagnosed the problems will never correct, and I believe its time that someone does take a stand to help these men to try and better them selves, everyone at some time in there life takes medication be it for the flu, illness, cancer.... its prescribed by a doctor to help correct a problem, and in this case he was prescribed a medication to help correct a chemical imbalance in his brain, and because he is in inmate in jail, he has to suffer through his illness, and not be treated. So what, his health is not important. I beg to differ, he is human, he has an illness and in all fairness he should get the same respect from a doctor in or out of jail.

  • Grandma
    July 01, 2010 - 20:23

    Did Ritalin keep him from criminal activity? Will it do so in the future? Not all who suffer from ADHD are involved in crime, most are productive citizens. The choices were made by Mr. Tobin not by the condition. Look inward sir, take responsibility for your actions. With or without Ritalin, only you can change your future. God bless and guide you.

  • Politically Incorrect
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    Stand back and watch the sanctimonious, morally superior, self-proclaimed criminological experts parade in with their nonsense hyperbole.

  • Merry Go
    July 01, 2010 - 20:19

    Which comes first the chivken or teh egg? or shall I say what is made first the criminal or the druggie? br br From my amateur eyes, maybe drugs are too easily prescribed on the outside making drug addicts out of people who then turn to crime. Maybe Craig is right.

  • Wasteatime
    July 01, 2010 - 20:14

    Get a few outside mental health professionals to review his cases. If what he's prescribing is causing more problems than it should be, then find another physician. br br In terms of the guy in the article, there are plenty of non-stimulant medications to treat his condition. Certainly ex-cons or people in prison shouldn't be given drugs that are known to cause aggression. br br I'm not sure I have a lot of sympathy for his drug case, but it does sound like a lot of people have complained about the doctor at the Penn. Time for his employer to do some investigating.

  • Sue
    July 01, 2010 - 20:14

    This is absolutely ridicules. Of course, we know you get special treatment if you are a criminal! Just complain and someone will assist you. Make your living accommodations a little more bearable while doing your time. Are you telling me I should commit some crime and get incarcerated before I am able to receive proper mental care. I am a single mom who was diagnosed with bi-polar only 4 years ago. (Dr. Craig also tried to accurately diagnose me years ago to no avail) It was hard enough to find a psychiatrist for my care but now my daughter is showing symptoms of the same and the Janeway is telling me there is a 6-8 month wait list to see a counselor (let alone a psychiatrist) at their Family Care Unit. I bet there will be enough dust kicked up about prisoners that they get the care they are looking for. Lets take care of our families first!

  • Over the Rainbow
    July 01, 2010 - 20:13

    It is called jail because they don't want you to come back. It is not a hotel.

  • Frank M
    July 01, 2010 - 20:08

    According to the article, prisoners at the penitentiary are not allowed to take their anti-psychotic medications.

    Does this policy hold as well for inmates on high blood pressure medication?

    They should have their medically necessary drugs provided to them in a controlled way and administered by a nurse or some other professional approved by the corrections administration.

    It would better to have people leave the penitentiary in a controlled and balanced state of mind.

    That being said, this guy's criminal activities are not always a result of being off his meds. No way.

    Just because you are off medications does not mean you plan and conduct ongoing illegal activity like trafficking illegal drugs.

    Don't do the crime if you don't want to do the time.

  • Kayla
    July 01, 2010 - 20:07

    'He has a lettered tattoo on his arm, but he appears neither menacing nor extraordinary.'

    What are you trying to say here?

  • Jimmy Mac
    July 01, 2010 - 20:05

    It's all about blame and excuses without taking personal responsibility. Bottom line, this guy is a career criminal who had as many chances in life as anyone else but decided he didn't like the working life style. He is a habitual low life who has nothing but a life time of prison to look forward to.

  • Polly
    July 01, 2010 - 20:05

    This is an excerpt from an article in the Telegram , dated April , 18, 2008 -----An independent review of adult corrections has been initiated by the provincial government with a goal of improving the safety and security of employees and inmates of Her Majestys Penitentiary (HMP) in St. Johns and other correctional facilities in the province. br The review will take into consideration policies, procedures and administration including the working and living conditions at HMP and other facilities. br The improvement of our corrections operations is not solely focused upon the construction of a new penitentiary, Justice Minister Jerome Kennedy said. It is about providing a safe environment for both our corrections staff and those in our custody. This issue is about more than just bricks and mortar. Minister Kennedy has long since moved on , the problems remain .

  • amazed
    July 01, 2010 - 20:05

    Ritalin is very popular on the street, people buy them, crush them and snort them. It is a good medication that is abused by substance abusers.
    I suspect people are removed from drugs by the Doctor at the pen to see how they actually are while off the medications, what symptoms they exhibit, so you can get an accurate assessment of what is actually wrong with them, and then treat accordingly. People who abuse drugs have symptoms that come from the abuse of the drug, not any psychiatric disorder. Bottom line, the guy has substance abuse issues that are probably the source of his problems. I'll take a psychiatrist's word over anyone else saying his current drug causes anger issues. Not getting the drug they want can cause anger issues too.

  • R
    July 01, 2010 - 20:03

    Ritalin is not the only drug of choice for a person with ADHD....therefore, he doesn't need to be treated with a drug that he can abuse. Secondly, a person is put in jail to reform from what they've done....if that means that a poorly monitored/treated mental illness could be rectified through the proper treatment, which they are not getting from Dr. Craig....then I would rather they get it. As for waitlists for family psychiatry programs that is unfortunate and my child is going through the same, but I think that a prisoners reform has just as much merit to our safe society once they are let out of prison to our children as getting help for our children who one day may be put in the same situation....you'll never know what path your child may take or mistakes they will do...ALL PSYCHIATRY FROM PRISON TO REGULAR SERVICES GIVEN TO CHILDREN AND ADULTS NEED TO BE OVERHAULED FROM THE BUILDINGS TO THE SO CALLED PROFESSIONALS PROVIDING CARE TO THESE PATIENTS....so it is not anyones fault but the goverments not alotting enough money for these programs.

  • Bill
    July 01, 2010 - 20:01

    I think this is ridiculous. I am a person who has worked with people with neurological deficits for nearly twenty-five years. This inmate deserves more than one opinion. I have come across more than one educator and professional who themselves had obsessive compulsive tendencies and went too far the other way in being against medications. When you traffic in it they are drugs. When you take them they are medications. I have heard many experts refer to these medications as wheelchairs for the mind. With a properly diagnosed case it is no different than taking away medications for diabetes. These medications can be given under strict supervision. Many well know professionals who are involved in studies now say ADHD is defined wrong, it is not that the person can't pay attention, it is that they are paying attention to too many things at one time thus the important thing is getting the attention it deserves by that individual. Many have more than one disorder so the case becomes complex with the co-morbidity. In Mr. Tobin's case if he also has some OCD behaviours he maybe be obsessing about not being treated as what he believes as being fair treatment and this manifests into other behavioural issues. The biggest problem at times is that professionals themselves feel they understand it, draw conclusions on insufficient information and everybody believes them because they are professionals . Our prison system needs people who are new a fresh and don't get caught up in the system of Oh here comes another one put an honest effort into figuring out why people are actually there in some cases it is because they didn't get the right treatment when young and it is rarely the Parents fault but they're made feel guilty. I repeat, wheel chairs for the mind . Are you listening?

  • K
    July 01, 2010 - 19:55

    Simple Solution to the prisoners IF YOU DIDNT DO IT - YOU WOULD NOT BE THERE br And you would of never meet Dr. Craigs

  • L
    July 01, 2010 - 19:49

    It's always the same stories coming from the Pen. Drug addictions and poorly managed mental illnesses. Mr. Fitzpatrick from Turnings, I'm sure, is tired of pleading for help for these people. When will someone finally listen to what's going on here??

  • give me a break
    July 01, 2010 - 19:49

    Excuse me if I don't exactly feel sorry for this guy.

    He was (allegedly) nabbed with drugs, drug paraphenalia and money from the sale of same, but he intends to plead not guilty for trafficking. Tobin admitted he is a manipulator and a con man, so how can anybody believe him? How many lives has he played a part in destroying?

    People like Tobin make my skin crawl.

  • CAD Sufferer
    July 01, 2010 - 19:47

    Even though some people may not take what this man is saying because he is a criminal seriously, I think they should. I was a patient at the HSC and had the unforunate opportunity to be assessed by Dr Craig..boy was he wrong! Dr Criag has his own ways of doing things and everyone else is wrong in his view.

  • Joey
    July 01, 2010 - 19:45

    it's not about feeling sorry for them. How can you expect them to behave rationally if they're not allowed to have medication prescribed to them by a psychiatrist? Dope them up as much as possible, I say.

  • nathan
    July 01, 2010 - 19:43

    What about what they call Case Conferencing - where a number of psychiatrists, psychologists and other specialists meet group-style with the client? the client is asked many questions and his/her history and medications are discussed and then the specialists go off and brainstorm to come up with a proper diagnosis and treatment. Wouldn't this be more effective than the mutually exclusive stylings of (Dr.) David Craig?

  • Bishop
    July 01, 2010 - 19:43

    I am David Tobin's Girlfriend, and first hand I can say while David was medicated, he lived a normal life, held down a good job, and fit in with society in a normal matter. A person can not say that because he was caught in a situation where drugs were seized that he don't deserve to be medicated for a condition that he has been diagnosed with since childhood, by several doctors. No one knows if he is guilty or not guilty, and in this situation he is pleading not guilty for a reason. Is it not a matter of innocent until proven guilty, or is it that people assume guilt, therefore you are guilty. Regardless of any of that, David was taken off his meds and placed on medication by Dr.Craig that causes high aggression, so as a citizen of today's society, that's what your agreeing with, for people in jail to be released into your society on medications that make them highly aggressive. Then what more do you expect from a person than to turn to criminal activity once again. Not everyone abuses there mental instability for a way to obtain drugs so they can abuse them for the wrong reasons. David is a good man, with a good out look on life, all he wants is the chance to live that life normal, to again hold down a good job, and be a part of society. and who is anyone to judge that. Not everyone is perfect, but everyone do deserve a chance. As long as these inmates are wrongfully treated and diagnosed the problems will never correct, and I believe its time that someone does take a stand to help these men to try and better them selves, everyone at some time in there life takes medication be it for the flu, illness, cancer.... its prescribed by a doctor to help correct a problem, and in this case he was prescribed a medication to help correct a chemical imbalance in his brain, and because he is in inmate in jail, he has to suffer through his illness, and not be treated. So what, his health is not important. I beg to differ, he is human, he has an illness and in all fairness he should get the same respect from a doctor in or out of jail.