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Fire destroys home on Bloomington Road


BLOOMINGTON - A family is homeless and the fate of several cats is not known after fire destroyed a two-storey house at 2049 Bloomington Road late Monday afternoon.

The call came in at around 4 p.m. with the Nictuax Volunteer Fire Department responding to a report of a house fire. Nictaux Chief Sheldon Nichols said his firefighters arrived to a fully involved structure fire.

“There was heavy, heavy fire on both floors,” Nichols said.

The Annapolis County Fire Services Association’s new automatic dispatch policy went live Monday, information officer Daniel Cheeseman said.

“As per Auto Aid Protocol, Lawrencetown and Middleton were automatically dispatched,” he said.

Chief Nichols said when he arrived he struck a second alarm and Kingston and Bridgetown were also dispatched.

Tanker and pumper trucks lined the narrow road, and smoke billowed from the burning building, sometimes so thick it obscured trucks, firefighters, and the house itself. Despite the advanced state of the blaze, firefighters were able to gain the upper hand quickly.

Crews mounted a ladder at one gable end and used a chainsaw to cut through that end near the peak to get foam on the flames. At the other end they used pikes to knock off siding, fascia and soffit on the rake to get to the fire.

The homeowners, a husband and wife, were visibly distraught and watched the progress of firefighters from a neighbour’s property across the road. The wife said two cats were outside and her husband managed to rescue a kitten they had just got recently. She said she didn’t know if two other cats had been able to escape.

RCMP, paramedics, and Nova Scotia Power were also on the scene.

Nichols said the Auto Aid Protocol worked well, getting resources and people on the scene quickly – important in knocking the fire down quickly and for firefighter safety.

The call came in at around 4 p.m. with the Nictuax Volunteer Fire Department responding to a report of a house fire. Nictaux Chief Sheldon Nichols said his firefighters arrived to a fully involved structure fire.

“There was heavy, heavy fire on both floors,” Nichols said.

The Annapolis County Fire Services Association’s new automatic dispatch policy went live Monday, information officer Daniel Cheeseman said.

“As per Auto Aid Protocol, Lawrencetown and Middleton were automatically dispatched,” he said.

Chief Nichols said when he arrived he struck a second alarm and Kingston and Bridgetown were also dispatched.

Tanker and pumper trucks lined the narrow road, and smoke billowed from the burning building, sometimes so thick it obscured trucks, firefighters, and the house itself. Despite the advanced state of the blaze, firefighters were able to gain the upper hand quickly.

Crews mounted a ladder at one gable end and used a chainsaw to cut through that end near the peak to get foam on the flames. At the other end they used pikes to knock off siding, fascia and soffit on the rake to get to the fire.

The homeowners, a husband and wife, were visibly distraught and watched the progress of firefighters from a neighbour’s property across the road. The wife said two cats were outside and her husband managed to rescue a kitten they had just got recently. She said she didn’t know if two other cats had been able to escape.

RCMP, paramedics, and Nova Scotia Power were also on the scene.

Nichols said the Auto Aid Protocol worked well, getting resources and people on the scene quickly – important in knocking the fire down quickly and for firefighter safety.

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