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A white blue jay? Rare bird hanging around Greenfield

This white blue jay has moved into Greenfield. It’s called a “leucisitic jay” and it has a rare genetic condition that removes all pigment. Pure white jays are very rare.
This white blue jay has moved into Greenfield. It’s called a “leucisitic jay” and it has a rare genetic condition that removes all pigment. Pure white jays are very rare.

GREENFIELD - Ever seen a white blue jay? Not many people have, because they are very rare. But one has moved into Greenfield and is causing quite a stir among locals.

 Marie Tomblin first noticed the jay hanging around her yard about a week ago.

It’s called a “leucistic jay”, which means it suffers from a rare genetic disorder that prevents the production of  pigment.

“It’s white, with some gray,” says Tomblin. “It’s been back and forth between my house and the  neighbours on either side of me.”

Tomblin has been feeding the white blue jay peanuts, and the bird doesn’t mind coming up close and personal.

“We’ve named her Lucy after leucistic,” she says.

The bird joins other blue jays feeding on the ground.

“That was where I first spotted her,” she says.

Tomblin says she did some research on the bird and found out that it is leucistic.

“It’s quite a rare sighting and I thought if there is anybody who is a bird watcher along the South Shore they might be interested in coming to see it,” she says.

The bird isn’t showing any signs of leaving soon.

“I was hoping a bird watcher could come and see it and put in their book and say they’ve seen it, because it’s a rare bird.”

According to Bird Studies Canada, leucistic jays are indeed very rare.

Leucism is a genetic mutation that prevents melanin and other pigments from being deposited normally on feathers, resulting in pale or muted colors on the entire bird.

The disorder is believed to occur in only about one per cent of the bird population.

 

 Marie Tomblin first noticed the jay hanging around her yard about a week ago.

It’s called a “leucistic jay”, which means it suffers from a rare genetic disorder that prevents the production of  pigment.

“It’s white, with some gray,” says Tomblin. “It’s been back and forth between my house and the  neighbours on either side of me.”

Tomblin has been feeding the white blue jay peanuts, and the bird doesn’t mind coming up close and personal.

“We’ve named her Lucy after leucistic,” she says.

The bird joins other blue jays feeding on the ground.

“That was where I first spotted her,” she says.

Tomblin says she did some research on the bird and found out that it is leucistic.

“It’s quite a rare sighting and I thought if there is anybody who is a bird watcher along the South Shore they might be interested in coming to see it,” she says.

The bird isn’t showing any signs of leaving soon.

“I was hoping a bird watcher could come and see it and put in their book and say they’ve seen it, because it’s a rare bird.”

According to Bird Studies Canada, leucistic jays are indeed very rare.

Leucism is a genetic mutation that prevents melanin and other pigments from being deposited normally on feathers, resulting in pale or muted colors on the entire bird.

The disorder is believed to occur in only about one per cent of the bird population.

 

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