Occupy Newfoundland organizers plan Saturday rally in St. John’s

Justin Brake
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

Occupy Newfoundland plans a rally at Harbourside Park in St. John’s as part of the growing global movement against corporate greed. — Photo by Justin Brake/Special to the Telegram

“If I lost my job right now I’d probably have to put my house on the market. I know they couldn’t fire me for this, but they could find another reason,” says Steve, a 30-something  single father, full-time low-wage worker, and one of several people who initiated the discussion to occupy Harbourside Park in St. John’s this weekend.

“I’m robbing Peter to pay Paul, right? And losing my job would be very destructive to my daughter, who comes first before everything else. So I’m not sure I want my name out there.”

Occupy Newfoundland is the local manifestation of a movement against unequal distribution of wealth that is sweeping across the globe.

The protests were sparked by the Occupy Wall Street encampment, set up almost a month ago near the New York Stock Exchange, to protest corporate greed and corruption.

Saturday morning Steve and others will gather at Harbourside Park to express their frustration over how they say the quality of their lives has been compromised in the name of the imprudent accumulation of wealth by the richest one per cent of the population.

Simultaneously, citizens of Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa and Halifax, along with a growing number of American cities and countries like Ireland, Brazil and France, will gather in solidarity to support the Wall Street protesters.

Occupy Newfoundland already has the support of the Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Labour (NLFL), which represents 65,000 workers in 28 affiliated unions provincewide, the Canadian Federation of Students for Newfoundland and Labrador, and a growing number of groups and citizens.

“Just how unjust our economic system has been for so long has been a big issue for the labour movement, not just in Canada but obviously throughout North America,” says NLFL president Lana Payne. “And we see this kind of action at the bargaining table every day in terms of trying to roll back benefits and wages, in particular for the next generation of workers. I think it’s important that we have this kind of independent movement happening.”

Steve says he and others committed to initiating the Occupy movement locally have been handing out circulars to students at Memorial University, connecting with union representatives and organizing the logistics for Saturday’s 10 a.m. start, when union reps and citizens are expected to address the crowd and share their stories.

“It’s important that people know what’s going on in the world,” he says. “There are a lot of issues going on, and really I just want people to get together in the tradition of democracy so our voices can be heard as a people, because that’s not really happening anymore.

“The government is representing corporate interests more and more and, you know, I’m kind of waking up to a larger reality the last little while,” he says. “I’ve been focused most of my life on small issues and what’s going on closer to me, but I feel like I’ve woken up as a part of the world instead of as just a drone.”

Dr. Robert Sweeny, a MUN history professor teaching courses on inequality in Canada and the history of capitalism, says the widespread discontent is due in large part to our provincial and federal governments’ slashing of corporate and high-income earner personal taxes while leaving the rest of the population to pay disproportionately high tax rates.

“The most recent figures produced during the election campaign by the provincial government (indicated) about $500 Million is the price tag of the tax cuts this year, and at least 32 per cent of that went to the top one per cent in Newfoundland,” he explains. “And 63 per cent went to the top 20 per cent of people who pay taxes. So the vast majority of people, about 80 per cent of the population of Newfoundland, benefitted from just a little over a third of the total tax cut.

“For the top one per cent we’re only talking about 2,700 people sharing 32 per cent of $500 Million. That’s a very substantial donation to those who have already benefitted through the very skewed economic growth over the past decade. We’ve had an unprecedented growth in high income earners in the province, people earning over a quarter of a million dollars a year — it’s gone from 800 to more than 1,200 in over four years. And they are the people who are getting the most beneficial tax cuts,” Sweeney says.

“In 2009, the last year we have the complete income tax data for, the average increase for the top income earners in the province, people earning over a quarter million dollars, was $43,000 over the previous three years, and the taxes they paid on that was an additional $2,000. If $43,000 is all they actually earned, they would end up paying $7,000 in taxes.

“The tax rate at the highest end has dropped by 9 per cent at the provincial level since 2007. Nine per cent of your income is a very substantial amount when you earn a quarter of a million dollars. That’s $23,000 you’re not paying in taxes any more. That’s actually higher than the median income for Newfoundlanders. So we are talking about a very substantial growing inequality that is highly concentrated at the top end.”

More information about Occupy Newfoundland’s mission statement is available online at www.facebook.com/occupyNL.

Organizations: Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Labour, New York Stock Exchange, Canadian Federation of Students for Newfoundland and Labrador

Geographic location: Newfoundland, Harbourside Park, Canada Toronto Montreal Vancouver Ottawa Halifax Ireland Brazil France North America MUN

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • yo mama
    October 21, 2011 - 08:15

    Pogey, weed and Nintendo party!!!

  • What a load
    October 15, 2011 - 07:46

    I don't believe all the crap from these whiners. If there's a problem then they helped create it but now they want someone else to clean up the mess. People complain about jobs going over seas but they'll buy the cheap products from that cheap overseas labour. People complain about the rich but nobody was complaining a few years ago when times were good. People complain that tax breaks for the rich are unfair but not a peep that the rich are taxed at a much higher rate. They complain about corporations but they choose the Walmarts, grocery chains and big banks over the small local businesses to the point that small businesses are almost all gone. You reap what you sow, you helped to create this mess and you can fix it the same way by making better choices in the future. But you won't, because you want what the rich and corporation's want - to keep the dollar in your pocket and that greed is what caused this mess.

  • Westcoaster
    October 14, 2011 - 22:42

    Llow voter turnout in the provincial election ndicates growing public dissatisfaction as well as apathy towards the present form of representative democracy. More folks in the US ( Occupy Wall Street stuff) and elsewhere in the world are demanding direct forms of political involvement – participatory and direct democracy. It’s crazy that people elect politicians every four years or so and expect that they are actually going to represent your interest. It ain’t working and more people are starting to realize this despite all the propaganda and bullshit political rhetoric to which they are subjected. The question is what am I going to do about this – bring about more direct, participatory democracy. I think for me it starts with realizing I am already empowered as a citizen and that by connecting and working with other like minded folks I can act to create true democracy and governance by and for the people. I like the much quoted Margaret Meade “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world, indeed it the only thing that ever has.”

  • kev
    October 14, 2011 - 20:29

    As long as I can remember, life has never been a cakewalk. The harder/smarter you work, the more money you make. It's simple. I think the bigger problem is everyones need to have an Iphone and a flatsceen.

    • jay
      October 17, 2011 - 16:42

      corporations make money. how can someone sit with a sign and "protest" that they shouldn't make so much money? if you had $100 dollars extra after all expenses were paid, and someone asked you to give up some of that money (but couldn't give you a valid reason other than the fact that they didn't have a share of your profit). would you give it up? really would you? sit here and suggest all you want, but I'd bet my $100 that you wouldn't. before you are supportive or against this cause, think about what they're asking. There was an interview on t.v. with the organizer of Occupy New York and they asked him what they protest was for? what did they look to get from the protest. and the guy couldn't answer, he finally said....we want to talk? TALK? go to work....sitting around wasting space when you don't know what you want. waste of time.

  • Paul
    October 14, 2011 - 20:03

    Your comment about entertainers is neither here not there. Surley you must see something wrong with wealth concentration throuhhout. Surely you can see that something in the system is drasticaly wrong when so many peoply are literally starving while others live in luxury beyone comprehension...

  • Paul
    October 14, 2011 - 20:02

    Your comment about entertainers is neither here not there. Surley you must see something wrong with wealth concentration throuhhout. Surely you can see that something in the system is drasticaly wrong when so many peoply are literally starving while others live in luxury beyone comprehension...

  • Fiesty
    October 14, 2011 - 19:42

    If you want to know who some of the 1200 are who earn $250K, just go ask government about the contracts they hand out for IT workers. Ask NATI

  • Glen
    October 14, 2011 - 14:17

    I am in agreement that the corporations need to stop with this overseas employment crap, there are plenty of people here who need those jobs and can be just as good at it or maybe even better. But (most) of these CEO's have busted their asses making the companies as successful as they are, and employing lots of people in the process. Deny it if you want, but I imagine 99% of you people, if in the same position, would be proud of your success and want to splurge on yourselves as well. If anyone should be targeted, it's the celebrities out there who make dismal movies, music, etc. They make millions for what they do, and I guarantee that every one of you (myself included) at some point in time have seen or heard something so bad, that you couldn't believe they make as much as they do.

    • Rob
      October 14, 2011 - 23:05

      Glen, that kind of misses the point here. This is about paying a proportional tax to everyone else, and the tendency for the richest people to influence government policy to get their taxes reduced. There is nothing stopping them from 'splurging' on themselves regardless.

  • Ingrid Bird
    October 14, 2011 - 13:36

    Newfoundlanders, pat yourselves on the back! I've been following the Facebook sites of OccupyCanada, Occupy Toronto, and OccupyMontreal as well as OccupyNewfoundland. For me, Newfoundlanders distinguish themselves as caring and generous; and I saw that reflected in the fact that OccupyNewfoundland was the only group I saw which asked protesters to bring nonperishable food for the food banks. Bravo!

  • R
    October 14, 2011 - 13:26

    Alright, let's break this down: "Every dollar a "rich" person has, he earned it, and someone willingly gave it to him." In what way do you think that a rich person earned "his" money more than a poor person? Time invested? Quality of work? By any criteria you might wish to measure entitlement by I could provide countless examples of people who work longer, harder, produce items of greater quality and work towards something of greater social benefit than the extremely wealthy. Is one person's time innately worth more than another's? As for the idea that money is willingly handed over, that is certainly not the case in many instances where the social, political, and economic environment is such that the "willingness" of the consumer to spend money on certain things is reduced to outright slavery and a more mitigated sense of slavery through debt constraints and marketplace options. If you want detailed examples, just ask. "Rich people actually create wealth." Oh yeah? Wealth in what way? Any example will do, just some justification or logic behind a statement. Then you can start a discussion as opposed to an advertisement. Dollars and cents don't cut it anymore. And even if it were down to dollars and cents, do you imagine that the extremely wealthy are like some sort of pot with a limit whereupon reaching the crest of the vessel the money comes a trickling down the sides? Greed has no limit. Even if "wealth" is created, it's not spread out through acts of magnanimity. "This is actually based on the fallacy that if someone is rich, he stole that money from someone else. That is simply untrue." Ok, so you must have been raised on the moral idea that if it's illegal it's bad and if it's legal it's cool. So therefore, completely duping people into thinking that they have money that they don't and taking the money that they did isn't stealing? That's called legal theft. It's complete exploitation and rape of the means that people have to survive. This is entirely about regaining some moral compass and rediscovering what should (but somehow seems to not) be blatantly regarded as robbery and criminally penalized. "Lowering taxes will often attract more companies to do business in the province, thus helping everyone. Look at the big picture. Wealth creation is more important than wealth redistribution." Dear Phil. What is your "big picture"? How do you imagine things working out? Do you like the way things are? Because you what they say "Keep doing what your doing and you'll keep getting what you're getting." Pandering to companies and corporations is obviously not helping everyone, otherwise we wouldn't be in a continual financial crisis with people in the streets. What makes you think we're going to turn a corner?

  • Mark
    October 14, 2011 - 12:04

    This is stupid. People want change, yet we just had an election with the lowers turn out ever. How dare they.

  • Phil
    October 14, 2011 - 11:51

    Every dollar a "rich" person has, he earned it, and someone willingly gave it to him. The rich have gotten richer, but so have the poor and everyone else in between. Rich people actually create wealth. This is actually based on the fallacy that if someone is rich, he stole that money from someone else. That is simply untrue. Lowering taxes will often attract more companies to do business in the province, thus helping everyone. Look at the big picture. Wealth creation is more important than wealth redistribution.

  • Anon
    October 14, 2011 - 11:13

    Maybe some of you don't realize but the lazy well-fare cases your talking about are the ones who have absolutely nothing to do with either side of this protest. I completely support this protest, maybe if some of you were more educated about corporate oligarchy and the misuse of our centralized Fiot system, then you would realize that becoming a billionaire doesn't help anything if that's what some of you are implying, that just adds to the problem, all money is essentially created out of debt. I somewhat believe being in debt or service to my community, but not to high frequency traders and corporations like Wal-Mart and Tim Hortons, who are literally placing bets on the downfall of complete civilizations.

  • Steve
    October 14, 2011 - 10:50

    Well John Smith its not just the poor and unemployed who will be at this event standing up for true democracy , we are the 99% and so are you my friend. There will be reps from all walks of life at this event speaking about all types of issues, and if you think that peacefully assembling together as a community to stand up for what we believe in, to discuss and get informed on whats important to us is a bad idea then stay home and watch it on the 6:00 news. Here is the mission statement for Occupy Newfoundland and as time goes on and the people who want to voice their issues do so we will form a list of what is important for the Newfoundland people. Every one should come out. Oh and by the way, the Nurses Union fully supports this movement, and the list of supporters grows and grows!!!! We at Occupy Newfoundland stand in solidarity with the 99 per cent of Canadian citizens that are tired of the effect that money via corporations had had on our society, and how it has overtaken our voices. Church and state were separated for democracy to function, so too must corporate interests be separate from the democratic process so that our officials can truly represent the people. Canadians aren’t apathetic but are frustrated at a broken system. We need clear regulations to keep the interests of business out of the business of politics. The laws that govern our nation today no longer reflect what we want for our families and the country we love. As we gather together in towns and cities in solidarity to express mass injustice, we must not lose sight of what brought us together. If you feel wronged by corporate forces, we are your allies. The time has come for every citizen of Canada to understand the basics of how our financial/banking/governmental system works. An informed and aware public is best capable of making wise and appropriate decisions. In that spirit, we ask the 99 per cent to come together to create awareness of these issues and learn how this affects our way of life so that we can create a better Canada. United, we acknowledge this reality: the future of the human race requires the cooperation of its members. Our system must protect our rights, and upon corruption of that system, it is up to the individuals to protect their own rights, and those of their neighbors. A democratic government derives its power from the people, but corporations do not seek consent to extract wealth from people and the Earth. No true democracy is attainable when the process is determined by economic power. We come to you at a time when corporations (which place profit over people, self-interest over justice and oppression over equality) run our governments. We will peacefully assemble on October 15th, as is our right, to let these facts be known. We, the Canadian General Assembly of the Provinces and Territories of Occupy Canada, in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street in Liberty Square, urge you to assert your power. Exercise your right to peaceful assembly, occupy public space, create a process to address the problems we face, and generate solutions accessible to everyone. To all communities that take action and form groups in the spirit of direct democracy, we offer support, documentation, and all of the resources at our disposal. Join us on Oct 15th and make your voices heard.

  • Carole
    October 14, 2011 - 10:31

    Protest groups got us our right to vote and to be considered "persons."

    • Jacob
      October 14, 2011 - 10:52

      When you rob Peter to pay Paul....... You can always count on the support of Paul.

  • Aaron
    October 14, 2011 - 10:06

    Anyone complaining that people should shut up, get an education and go find a job obviously hasn't had to look for a job in a very, very long time. I am finishing a graduate degree and the job market is extremely bleak. I'm not being picky either: I'd happily work my way up from an entry-level job if only I could find one. I am working three jobs to put myself through school and it still isn't enough. One of these jobs is literally sorting through garbage and recyclable materials on campus, so it's pretty frustrating to hear all of this poorly thought out criticisms of the Occupy Newfoundland Movement. One last thing to consider: Much like in Argentina ten years ago when the economy cliffed, the demonstrations across the US and the world have grown to the size they are now is because the endangered species that is the middle class has had the rug pulled out from underneath them despite years of hard work due to corporate greed. They've realized the government serves 1% of the population, but this realization has come too late to save their homes, they health, and their families. Just because you're sitting comfortably north of the border right doesn't mean it won't happen to you soon down the road. Holy Moses, smell the roses.

  • Aaron
    October 14, 2011 - 10:05

    Anyone complaining that people should shut up, get an education and go find a job obviously hasn't had to look for a job in a very, very long time. I am finishing a graduate degree and the job market is extremely bleak. I'm not being picky either: I'd happily work my way up from an entry-level job if only I could find one. I am working three jobs to put myself through school and it still isn't enough. One of these jobs is literally sorting through garbage and recyclable materials on campus, so it's pretty frustrating to hear all of this poorly thought out criticisms of the Occupy Newfoundland Movement. One last thing to consider: Much like in Argentina ten years ago when the economy cliffed, the demonstrations across the US and the world have grown to the size they are now is because the endangered species that is the middle class has had the rug pulled out from underneath them despite years of hard work due to corporate greed. They've realized the government serves 1% of the population, but this realization has come too late to save their homes, they health, and their families. Just because you're sitting comfortably north of the border right doesn't mean it won't happen to you soon down the road. Holy Moses, smell the roses.

  • Jay White
    October 14, 2011 - 09:29

    I don't think you guys are lazy at all.....but I do think you're looking for someone else to solve YOUR problem. Don't protest so someone else will find your answer, make things happen for yourself! I'm a young educated individual, I come from a single income family of a tradesperson(now retired- not a current Fort Mac type). I returned to NL after my education, worked my tail to start my own business, had no income for a long period of time.......and now I'm doing quite well.......because of my very own efforts. I didn't look to the 'rich' to help me out, or tax them at at a greater rate to help me out......I figured out the system, the game, joined in and am now succeeding. As a wise person once said.....if you don't have a solution, you don't have a problem. Your energies could be directed in a much more positive direction than 'protesting'. Look inside yourself and take stock of the choices you've made, and think about choices you will make...................I do not support you!

    • R
      October 14, 2011 - 10:28

      I can't quite understand who the "you" or "they" are who these comments seem to be blaming for leeching off society. The story is not about people collecting EI. The lowest rung on the economic ladder are not the most affected, in my opinion, by hard economic times. The very poor are always in hard economic times, by definition. The current economic inequalities, as outlined in the article, ought to be gathering together the very "normal", hard-working folks who are mortgaged and borrowing to the hilt, who are contributing the vast majority of money to the tax pool and who are consistently spending money. The "occupy" movement is FOR the working class AND the class of folks that are finding it hard to find work, especially decent work. A movement about economic disparity ought to be apolitical. Come ye office workers, you blue-collar workers and you workers unable to find self-respecting employment. I imagine most people reading this are among the 99%. Unless you are among the 1%, why are you upset about a protest that has you and your work and your means in mind? People say that there is no clear message to accompany the protest that started in New York. This is a copout. People are upset about the way the world is turning, specifically the distribution of wealth. Just because they have their own reasons and stories around these issues doesn't discredit the fact that there are a bunch of people who are fed up with the crooks at the top hoarding the world's resources.

    • R
      October 14, 2011 - 10:31

      I can't quite understand who the "you" or "they" are who these comments seem to be blaming for leeching off society. The story is not about people collecting EI. The lowest rung on the economic ladder are not the most affected, in my opinion, by hard economic times. The very poor are always in hard economic times, by definition. The current economic inequalities, as outlined in the article, ought to be gathering together the very "normal", hard-working folks who are mortgaged and borrowing to the hilt, who are contributing the vast majority of money to the tax pool and who are consistently spending money. The "occupy" movement is FOR the working class AND the class of folks that are finding it hard to find work, especially decent work. A movement about economic disparity ought to be apolitical. Come ye office workers, you blue-collar workers and you workers unable to find self-respecting employment. I imagine most people reading this are among the 99%. Unless you are among the 1%, why are you upset about a protest that has you and your work and your means in mind? People say that there is no clear message to accompany the protest that started in New York. This is a copout. People are upset about the way the world is turning, specifically the distribution of wealth. Just because they have their own reasons and stories around these issues doesn't discredit the fact that there are a bunch of people who are fed up with the crooks at the top hoarding the world's resources.

  • Paul J
    October 14, 2011 - 08:58

    there is something wrong when corporate profits climb while there are more and more people struggling to pay their basic needs...rent, heat, food, etc, while their pay checks get smaller... there is nothing wrong with companies making money but there has to be a balance. uncontrolled capitalism, or more like 'corporatism' is not good for anyone but the few making large salaries and bonuses in those corporations. think about when Abitibi was shutting down the mill in GFW...during that time they were giving huge bonuses to their top execs...this is just one symptom...but it points at the problem. why should our workers accept lower wages or less work , because corporations can get the work done cheaper in China, while the corporations' profits continue to climb.

  • Wanda
    October 14, 2011 - 08:42

    Protest groups usually do not help situations. The "poor" working class would be better off on the welfare system. Then again, you cannot put a price on self-respect; at least you are trying to make a living without leeching off other taxpayers, as well as being a good example to your children.

  • Kate MacDonald
    October 14, 2011 - 08:37

    I am a young person with a job and an education living below the poverty line. I am not lazy. I have worked since I have been old enough to work. This is not whinning. People who are ignorant to what is going on are half the problem. You have obviously never been in need or want for life basics. It is about time those being oppressed took a stand. They have my support, 100%.

  • Kate MacDonald
    October 14, 2011 - 08:35

    I am a young person with a job and an education living below the poverty line. I am not lazy. I have worked since I have been old enough to work. This is not whinning. People who are ignorant to what is going on are half the problem. You have obviously never been in need or want for life basics. It is about time those being oppressed took a stand. They have my support, 100%.

  • Kate MacDonald
    October 14, 2011 - 08:32

    I am a young person with a job and an education living below the poverty line. I am not lazy. I have worked since I have been old enough to work. This is not whinning. People who are ignorant to what is going on are half the problem. You have obviously never been in need or want for life basics. It is about time those being oppressed took a stand. They have my support, 100%.

  • Adam Smith
    October 14, 2011 - 08:32

    Actually John, the poor spend those dollars here on goods and services that go back into our economy, whereas the wealthy are more likely to bank it offshore or, in the sase of corporations, use it to export jobs out of the country. It's exactly those policies that lead to high unemployment -- not laziness. 1) What have you done to benefit society? And 2) shouldn’t you be working rather than playing on the internet?

  • Nick
    October 14, 2011 - 08:30

    The usual shills are in here decrying the movement, as usual. Get a clue, folks, times are the worst they have ever been for this generation and growth hasn't happened for 30 years. Anyone who is actually middle class or below realizes that the top are squeezing us dry. Stop talking about "hippies" and "handouts" and realize you are just being led like sheep to the slaughter. I support the protest and quite frankly anyone with a sweet clue about economics should be as well. In Canada, the top 10% control 60% of everything, and the bottom 20% (by the way, that includes those evil people on permanent disability and the working class which is prettymuch all Newfoundland has with median income of ~30k) owns 2% of everything. The bottom 60% owns ~14%. Do the math, and bring your head out of the sand.

    • Jacob
      October 14, 2011 - 09:09

      At its core this protest is about letting the government take something from someone and give it to someone else. You can argue with me all you like but that’s basically it. What gives the government the right or the power to do this. When did it become ok to punish someone for being successful. A lot of people who posted here in favor of the protests need to realize one thing. No matter your station in life there is always someone lower. How would you like it if the government took what you had to give to someone else. I would like to pose a challenge to the pro-protesters. You want the government to take from the rich and give to the poor. You want the government to be the decider and controller of how much people earn or need. Here’s the challenge. If you can name me one government program. One government department or even one example of government efficiency……. I will change my mind and agree with the protestors. One rule, You cannot use the MHA’s or MP’s salary raises or their pension plan as an example of government efficiency.

  • J
    October 14, 2011 - 08:27

    Jon: There are a lot of different people who are in on this movement--some of them MAY be scabs but many of them are hard-working, educated individuals. You sound like a republican. Anyway--my issue is that among the protests in the larger cities, it's been reported that a majority of the people involved aren't entirely sure what they're fighting for (aside the blanket statement of "Fairness"--they can't say precisely what the unfairness is) and the reason they're there is because they want to "Be a part of something". I worry that this is what will happen here and you're going to get a bunch of yutzes who will jump on any issue just so get credibility as an activist (Read: MUNSU) and it will end up doing MORE damage to the cause than it will good. (I also don't know what the cause is anymore, as it's gotten too convoluted for me to follow).

    • Paul
      October 14, 2011 - 08:35

      Jon...the cause, in my opinion, is threefold. Rising inequality, increasing corporate power and the continued destruction of the environment.

  • Paul
    October 14, 2011 - 08:24

    If average people do not start pushing back against increasing corporate power, increasing inequality and continued destruction of the environment, everyone will suffer.

  • Politically Incorrect
    October 14, 2011 - 08:23

    Well done to the organisers and the attendees. The self-serving, smug minority will try to paint you as a bunch of left-wing losers and hippies. This is the extent of their intellectual abilities as they cower behind the skirts of their masters. The right to vote, go to school, healthcare, to organise our workplaces, challenge discrimination, and so much of what makes us a liveable society wasn’t given to us by those in power, it was won by people willing to put themselves on the line and fight for what they believed in. The real freeloaders are those who contemptuously sneer and deride what you are doing while enjoying the benefits brought about by people like you who work to put the good of the community and the world ahead of their own wants. Bravo!

  • Peggy
    October 14, 2011 - 08:21

    The rich get richer and the poor and middle class workers keep struggling on and on. Unfortunately, this isn't going to change no matter what we do.

  • Jon Smith
    October 14, 2011 - 08:19

    If they put as much effort into getting an education and getting a good job as they put into whining we would all be a lot happier.... how much of our tax dollars do the rich use? compared to the poor not very much. I'm tired of seeing my tax dollars wasted on excessive handouts for lazy people who will never benefit our society. It is time to stop the whining and start working.

    • Politically incorrect
      October 14, 2011 - 08:42

      It's not only about poverty, but about democracy. This protest is for everyone.

  • Not Clear
    October 14, 2011 - 08:18

    Perhaps I should pay more attention to my tax returns but I always thought that we have a progressive tax system which taxes higher income earners at higher rates. Isn't that discriminatory, an inequality that already exists. If so, then why the double standard.

  • Adam
    October 14, 2011 - 07:50

    yes...put an anti-capitalism campaign and link on facebook, one of the groups that are to blame. makes so much sense. the government has to be cutting taxes for the wealthy for a reason...what could it be ???

  • darls
    October 14, 2011 - 07:44

    seriously people....how many people working in a union can't afford to pay their bills...this protest should only be for low income workers who are getting shafted at every turn....get with it people.....cheers....

    • Paul
      October 14, 2011 - 08:31

      Darls..perhaps SOME people who are not low income earners believe that supporting your fellow man is a good thing.

    • DJL
      October 14, 2011 - 10:17

      How wonderful for you Jacob. Do you pay for your own roads, schools, police, etc? No? They're pretty efficent. The government is pretty efficent about handouts and special privledges for big business too. It's about democracy. Capitalism and democracy [ And I don't mean writing an 'X' every few years] are mutually exclusive. Which do you prefer?

  • Janice B.
    October 14, 2011 - 07:16

    If you love your freedom, thank a protestor.

    • wtf
      October 15, 2011 - 07:24

      ' thank a protestor ' ?? No my duck, thank a soldier.