Remembering the Truxtun and the Pollux

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Published on February 20, 2012

Capt. Stephen Jordan, representing the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa, lays a wreath during a ceremony remembering the USS Truxtun and Pollux, while chief warrant officer two Brad Peck looks on.

Published on February 20, 2012

St. Lawrence Mayor Wayde Rowsell and Deputy Mayor Kate Edwards lay a wreath during a ceremony Saturday.

Published on February 20, 2012

RCMP officers lead a Canadian Forces marching band through town during ceremonies to remember the USS Truxtun and Pollux.

Published on February 20, 2012

Philip Parkerson points out to his son, Nick, where the USS Truxtun was destroyed. Parkerson’s uncle was a signalman.

Published on February 20, 2012

Remembering the Truxtun and Pollux 70th anniversary.

Published on February 20, 2012

Marking the 70th anniversary of the Truxtun and Pollux naval disasters.

Published on February 20, 2012

Capt. Stephen Jordan lays a wreath during a ceremony at Chambers Cove, Saturday.

Published on February 20, 2012

Lanier Philips (right) and rescuer Levi Pike chat while standing above the cliffs of Chambers Cove while others attending the ceremony look on.

Published on February 20, 2012

USS Navy Command Master Chief Paulette Brock and Chief Warrant Officer Two Brad Peck, both of the USS Truxtun, fold a 48-star flag during a ceremony Saturday.

Published on February 20, 2012

Lanier Philips points to the USS Truxtun while talking to Nick Parkerson about his great uncle and signalman, Clifford Parkerson.

Saturday marked the 70th anniversary of one of the worst naval disasters in U.S. history.  But for the people of Lawn and St. Lawrence it also marked the stubborn resilience and courage of  the people of the two towns, who worked tirelessly to save the lives of American naval officers and crew aboard two ships, the USS Truxtun and the USS Pollux after they were  ran aground against the rocks in Lawn Point and Chambers Cove Feb. 18, 1942.

There were 186 survivors out of the  203 people on board. The two ships were lost.

The two communities remembered the disaster and the bravery that followed Saturday with Truxtun survivor Lanier Phillips, 88, and several relatives of the survivors. Two of the original rescuers,Gus Etchegary and Levi Pike, also took part in events.

A multi-denominational memorial service was followed by wreath-laying ceremony at the cliffs of Chambers Cove.

A play “Colorblind” written about Philips and performed by the Blues Players of St.Lawrence Academy concluded the commemoration.

telegram@thetelegram.com

Organizations: Blues Players, StLawrence Academy

Geographic location: U.S.

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Recent comments

  • ron
    February 20, 2012 - 16:40

    i have a helmet that came of the pollux or truxton..many stories.

  • Randy Harnett
    February 20, 2012 - 13:24

    The telegram screws up another set of facts.

  • gary
    February 20, 2012 - 10:25

    Just to let you and the writers @ the Telegram know.... There were 186 men that were saved, but 203 lost their lives in this disaster... Not 203 men on board... May they all RIP and great to see they will all be remembered...

  • H
    February 20, 2012 - 10:10

    Please check your "facts" There were 186 survivors out of the 203 people on board. the telegram gets it wrong again

  • Don Lester
    February 20, 2012 - 08:35

    I'm glad we still remember the men who lost their lives in February , 1942. I'm also happy Mr. Philips came to participate in the ceremony. Long may he be with us.

    • David Savoie
      February 20, 2012 - 21:16

      Just met Lanier Phillips in the Houston airport. He was being escorted by a Canadian Naval officer. What an honor!! My daughter serves on the USS Truxtant DDG103...