Update: Tow line reattached to Transocean rig after weather forces it to be released

The Canadian Press and The Telegram
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Crew safe on Henry Goodrich according to Transocean spokesman

The deepwater rig, Henry Goodrich, is seen in this file image as it prepares to move to the Flemish Pass to drill a second Mizzen well for Statoil Canada. Alongside the rig is the anchor handling tug, Skandi Vega. — Submitted photo

The U.S. Coast Guard says a tow line that was released in rough weather has been reattached to a mobile drill rig destined for Newfoundland.

A coast guard spokeswoman said the Henry Goodrich was heading to Terra Nova when weather conditions forced officials to remove the tow line.

Petty officer Connie Terrell of the coast guard centre in Boston says the line was now in place and the rig was expected to make good time, though she didn’t know its arrival time.

She says it was about 405 kilometres southeast of Halifax after undergoing maintenance and upgrades at a shipyard in Mississippi.

Officials say the line on the Transocean rig was released as a safety precaution and happened sometime before 8 a.m. eastern standard time on Wednesday.

Transocean spokesman Guy Cantwell says the Henry Goodrich was secure and all 117 people on board were safe.

 

 

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(earlier story)

A mobile drill rig destined for Newfoundland was released from its towline Wednesday morning due to weather conditions, according to a spokesman for the United States Coast Guard District One Command Center.

Petty officer Connie Terrell of the coast guard centre in Boston said today that the line was now in place and the rig was expecting to make good time, though she didn’t know its arrival time.

The Henry Goodrich, owned by Transocean, had undergone maintenance work and was in the process of returning to Terra Nova when weather conditions early Wednesday morning forced officials to remove the towline.

As of Wednesday evening, it was approximately 210 nautical miles southeast of Halifax, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The spokesman said the towline was released as a safety precaution. He said the incident happened prior to the start of his shift at 8 a.m. eastern standard time.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the rig was not adrift and was still moving under its own power with an assist vessel dispatched to help it reach port more quickly.

Guy Cantwell, director of corporate communications for Transocean, said the drill rig was using two thrusters to proceed at four knots per hour on its scheduled course.

"The Henry Goodrich is secure, and the 117 people aboard are safe," he said.

Once weather permits, Cantwell said a towline will be reattached to the rig.

Organizations: U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Coast Guard.The

Geographic location: Newfoundland, United States, Terra Nova Halifax

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Recent comments

  • Shawn
    April 08, 2012 - 21:48

    You are both right and wrong in a way, WAY TO GO, The Henry Goodrich was originally on it's way to the Terra Nova Grandbanks, that is until the problem with the Towline. The rigg was just towed into Marystown harbour today April 8th. Not sure if The telegram can confirm why? Is this going to mean any work for Kiewit Shipyard? But then since she just left a Mississippi shipyard I'm guessing Transocean just has to make sure the towline is 100% secure before heading to it's original destination.

  • Way to go
    April 06, 2012 - 09:04

    First, didn't get released by anyone. The tow line failed. Releasing the towline for "safety" is in fact the opposite of what "officials" would do. Second, headed to Mortier Bay, NL not Grand Banks. Third, happened Tuesday Evening not Wednesday. Fourth, in Canadian Water not the USCG authority. Fifth, 122 people onboard.