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Recent comments

  • Juanita & Austin Langdon
    April 05, 2014 - 16:26

    wanting to purchase land for organic farming.

  • JB
    July 03, 2012 - 21:58

    Thanks for covering farming on the west coast as well as east! As for you milk debaters, I think Canada has more stringent guidelines than the US. (ie less or no added hormones). Something to think about, and perhaps another story to investigate for our intrepid reporter? I've lived both in Halifax and St. John's, and I love the fact that we don't have the screw cap on the 2 liter cartons here. For some reason the addition of the screw cap meant it could no longer be recycled in Halifax, which is a pity.

  • M
    July 03, 2012 - 11:15

    Clearly many of you have a lot to learn about the quality us Canadian Dairy Farmers provide for our consumers. We have very high standards that must be met in order to ship our milk to Canadian Dairies. The United States do not have as stringent standards that need to be met to sell their milk. Do you know how much work and money is put into producing quality milk? Clearly many do not, as this is always a common compliant. Milk is too expensive, we want to pay what Americans pay for their milk.....I think everyone should step back and stop jumping to conculsions and be a little more informed before making these under researched speculations. Another note is Farmers do not receive the price for their products that you pay for at the grocery store. On average, about 0.76 cents per litre. You don't see anyone complaining about forking over money for pop which is sugar and water.

  • Jack
    July 03, 2012 - 10:49

    Ever Wonder, not only are Americans getting cheaper milk, other Canadians also get milk in 4 litre jugs or bags, but not in Newfoundland and Labrador despite the fact that two main dairy sellers, Central Dairies/Farmer's Dairy Cooperative and Scotsburn Dairies, are Nova Scotian companies based in Halifax and Scotsburn respectfully. For example, while Scotsburn and Farmer's Dairy Cooperative sell milk in 4 litre jugs, bags, or even twist cap 2 litre cartons in Nova Scotia, they only sell milk in outdated 2 litre cartons with no twist cap in Newfoundland and Labrador. With Nova Scotian based dairy distributors selling milk in 4 litre jugs in Nova Scotia, but not in Newfoundland and Labrador, some people start to wonder why the Newfoundland and Labrador Government are allowing Farmer's Dairy and Scotsburn to discriminate against us and get away with it. Time for Newfoundland and Labrador dairy consumers to stand up to Farmer's Dairy/Central Dairies and Scotsburn Dairy to bring milk in 4 litre jugs, bags, and twistable 2 litre jugs to this province so that we are treated fairly with Nova Scotians. Something to think about. When I visited my home town, Halifax, for vacation last summer, I was happy to see the 4 litre jug of milk again.

    • Ever Wonder
      July 03, 2012 - 12:36

      I agree, NL does have high prices for milk but not the highest. Average price of a 2 litre (2%) carton of milk in St. John's in 2011 = $3.79. Average price of a 2 litre (2%) carton of milk in Halifax (your hometown) = $3.94. We also had high prices before supply management and we'll have the highest prices when supply management is gone. Anyone old enough to remember will recall how bad the quality of milk was before supply management. We could do like the Americans and subsidize the farmers or go with our system and let the consumers do that instead.

    • Jack
      July 03, 2012 - 19:51

      Ever Wonder, in Halifax, while 2 litre cartons of milk are more expensive than St. John's due to the added cost of the twistable cap, 4 litre jugs of milk are usually much cheaper per litre. In fact, when I shopped at the Spryfield "No Frills" during my Halifax visit last summer, their 4 litre jugs of Farmer's Dairy Milk sold for well under $6.00 or just under $1.50 per litre. Some stores even sell similar jugs of milk as low as $5.20 due to tight competition with Sobey's, Atlantic Superstore, No Frills, Walmart, Irving, and even Costco Wholesale. However, that's still well above the average price for a 4 litre jug of milk in Ontario, which is usually less than $4.00, even in convenience stores like Mac's. Imagine the amount of money Newfoundlanders and Labradorians will save if Central Dairies and Scotsburn sold milk in 4 litre jugs as opposed to outdated 2 litre cartons.

  • Jack
    July 03, 2012 - 10:37

    Don't forget that Newfoundland and Labrador dairy consumers are not being treated fairly in comparison to other provinces despite the fact that most of them are Nova Scotian based, mainly based on Halifax and Scotsburn. For example, while Central Dairies, a subsidiary of Halifax based Farmer's Dairy Cooperative, and Scotsburn Dairy, both Nova Scotian based dairy companies, sell milk in 4 litre jugs and bags to their Nova Scotian customers, they don't sell it in Newfoundland and Labrador. Their actions raises questions whether or not Farmer's Dairy and Scotsburn are discriminating against Newfoundlanders and Labradorians. If Newfoundlanders and Labradorians are treated the same, Farmer's Dairy and Scotsburn should sell milk in 4 litre jugs to us like they do to Nova Scotians. Another case for discrimination against us is that Farmer's Dairy and Scotsburn sell their milk in 2 litre cartons with twistable caps in Nova Scotia, but not in Newfoundland and Labrador. Time for Nova Scotian based dairy producers to treat Newfoundlanders the same way as Nova Scotians.

  • Jack
    July 03, 2012 - 10:28

    Can't wait for the Harper Government to get rid of supply management so that dairy farmers will not be subjected to quotas or be forced to purchase them. That way, Canadians will be able to purchase dairy products at American Level prices.

  • Don II
    July 03, 2012 - 09:38

    For some reason the Government of Newfoundland continues to hold total control of millions of acres of Crown land that could be used for other purposes than just growing trees. Unless the policy has been changed recently, a farmer could only obtain a lease for a maximum of 40 hectares or about 88 acres of Crown land for agriculture purposes. The first problem is that 88 acres is not enough land to operate a successful farm. The second problem is that no Commercial bank will lend money to a farmer who does not own his/her land outright. The banks don't like leased land as an asset. Why doesn't the Government of Newfoundland identify areas of Crown land which is proven suitable for farming and sell 100 acre Grants of that Crown land to farmers for a reasonable price payable over time? How much Crown land can an individual farmer own in Newfoundland? If it can be justified as economically feasible, perhaps a maximum of 500 acres is possible. Why not? It appears that the Government of Newfoundland sold off 2000 acres of prime Crown land around Mount Pearl to a single buyer and is still selling more. Land use rules in Newfoundland and Labrador are draconian and arbitrary. Nobody in Government asks the private land owners what they plan to develop their land for and Municipal Government zones it as rural to the financial detriment of the private land owner. Land which can be used for residential purposes is zoned as rural. I know a man who has 10 acres of land that is not large enough for a successful commercial farm but it is ideal for residential development. The Municipal Government zoned his land as rural suitable only for farming. The Council just drew a line around the Town when making their development plans and his land fell just outside what THEY considered would be good land for residential development so THEY just zoned it as rural. What kind of land use planning is that? There are farms where houses should be and houses where farms should be in Newfoundland and Labrador. Meanwhile, thousands of acres of Crown land suitable for farming goes undeveloped. What a joke!

  • J
    July 03, 2012 - 07:32

    They are better off waiting until Supply Side Management is negotiated by Stephen Harper in the Trans Pacific Pact trade agreement. That should see farms/land comes down in price. The sooner the better too as we as consumers should not be paying $4 for 2 litres of milk. I could buy a gallon of milk (3.78litres) for $2.99 in Houston. A gallon of organic milk was $5.99. We are being gouged. Don't let anyone fear monger either. Milk in the USA is no different than here, maybe a few different things in the cows but all in all just as healthy. Chinese milk would be a different story and I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole. So hopefully we can see country of origin on labelling Mr. Harper!!

    • Ever wonder
      July 03, 2012 - 09:33

      Ever wonder why that milk in the US is so cheap?

  • J
    July 03, 2012 - 07:31

    They are better off waiting until Supply Side Management is negotiated by Stephen Harper in the Trans Pacific Pact trade agreement. That should see farms/land comes down in price. The sooner the better too as we as consumers should not be paying $4 for 2 litres of milk. I could buy a gallon of milk (3.78litres) for $2.99 in Houston. A gallon of organic milk was $5.99. We are being gouged. Don't let anyone fear monger either. Milk in the USA is no different than here, maybe a few different things in the cows but all in all just as healthy. Chinese milk would be a different story and I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole. So hopefully we can see country of origin on labelling Mr. Harper!!