Wind, storm surge warnings issued

Deana Stokes Sullivan
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The areas in red on a map of Newfoundland show where wind and storm surge warnings have been issued by Environment Canada for today and Friday. Special weather statements have also been issued for parts of Newfoundland and Labrador because of high winds and blowing snow expected from an intense low pressure system.

Environment Canada has issued a storm surge warning for St. John's and Newfoundland's northeast coast, as well as special weather statements for high winds and blowing snow in some areas today and Friday.

The weather office says an intense low pressure system over the North Atlantic will remain nearly stationary for the next few days.

Large waves, pounding surf and high water levels are expected at high tides tonight and Friday around St. John's and vicinity and along the northeast coast.

Northwesterly winds will continue to increase today. Winds are expected to gust to 100 kms/hour over exposed regions overnight and persist on Friday.

Environment Canada says these strengthening winds will combine with fresh snowfall to reduce visibility in blowing snow especially over exposed areas tonight and into Friday.

"In addition," it says, "large swell generated by this low will approach Newfoundland from the northeast and will combine with a moderate storm surge to produce higher than normal water levels this evening and Friday. Regions with a northeastern exposure along the Northern Peninsula specifically near St. Lunaire - Griquet and along the east coast from Fogo Island to St. John's, can expect large waves, pounding surf, and higher than normal water levels to develop this evening at high tide. Similar conditions are expected to redevelop during the Friday morning high tide and potentially again Friday evening. These factors are likely to result in coastal infrastructure damage for exposed regions mentioned above. "

Environment Canada's special weather statement regarding strong winds, snow and blowing snow tonight and into Friday has been issued for the following areas:

      - St. John's and vicinity

      - Avalon Peninsula North

      - Clarenville and vicinity

      - Bonavista Peninsula

      - Terra Nova

      - Gander and vicinity

      - Bonavista North

      - Bay of Exploits

      - Green Bay - White Bay

      - Grand Falls-Windsor and vicinity

      - Northern Peninsula East.

The weather office says, currently, regions along the Northeast Coast are expected to receive the largest snowfall accumulations where between 10 and 20 cms are forecast by Friday night.  

St. John's and vicinity is forecast to see periods of snow tonight with accumulations of two to four cms and blowing snow over exposed areas overnight.

Further snowfall accumulation in the St. John's-metro region Friday is expected to be about five cms.

Although the largest snowfall accumulation is expected along the northeast coast, Environment Canada says fresh snow will combine with strong northwesterly winds to reduce visibility, especially over exposed areas, tonight and into Friday from St. Anthony to St. John's.

Another special weather statement has been issued for Labrador regions — Cartwright to Black Tickle and Norman Bay to Lodge Bay — where snow and strong winds are expected tonight and Friday.

Snow associated with the intense low pressure over the North Atlantic is forecast to develop over southeastern Labrador by tonight and persist on Friday.  This snow will combine with strong northwesterly winds to reduce visibility with blowing snow.

Environment Canada says the public is advised to monitor future forecasts and warnings as warnings may be required or extended.

The latest forecasts and warnings are available online at www.weatheroffice.gc.ca.

 

 

Organizations: Environment Canada

Geographic location: St. John's, Newfoundland, North Atlantic Fogo Island Clarenville Terra Nova Bonavista North Exploits Green Bay Northeast Coast St. Anthony Labrador regions Norman Bay Lodge Bay Southeastern Labrador

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