European Union seal product ban clobbers traditional Scottish business

The Canadian Press
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Canada’s bid to challenge a European Union ban on seal products is receiving support from an unlikely corner of the globe.

Stephen Scott is a partner in an 80-year-old family business in Edinburgh, Scotland that makes sporrans — the belted pouch men wear in front of their traditional Highland kilts.

His small company, W.E. Scott and Son, has been forced to lay off staff because it is banned from buying Canadian grey seal pelts — the material long used to make its most popular sporrans.

Scott says he and his father have signed on to Canada’s challenge of the ban through the World Trade Organization.

Canada’s challenge before the WTO was heard earlier this week, and a decision is expected later this year.

 

 

Organizations: European Union, WTO

Geographic location: Canada, Edinburgh, Scotland

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  • H JEFFORD
    May 01, 2013 - 16:12

    If the European Union has a ban on SEAL PRODUCTS THEN THEY MUST BE AGAINST THE SEAL CULL OR HUNT THAT IS THE ONLY FISHERY THAT IS TRYING TO BRING THE GREATEST TREAT TO THE LARGEST FOOD SORCE IN THE WORLD "THE NORTHERN COD STOCK" Which They Fished For Years! UNDER Control

  • Jack
    May 01, 2013 - 14:43

    Since parts of the Atlantic Provinces are predominantly Scottish, particularly Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland's Humber Valley Area, and Nova Scotia (especially Northern Mainland Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island), it comes to no surprise that some Scottish businesses are supporting our bid to overturn the European Union's unjust ban on seal products. In the case of the Humber Valley area, most residents are descendants of Cape Breton settlers whom came to Newfoundland, especially communities like Deer Lake.