Revenue Agency says 44 off-shore tax cheats convicted since 2006, won’t say who

The Canadian Press
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OTTAWA — As an international investigation of tax evaders broadens to include Canadian authorities, the federal government says it has convicted just 44 individuals of offshore tax cheating since 2006.

And the total amount of fines levied — $6.8 million — is less than the $7.7 million in taxes that were evaded.

Between April 2006 and March 2012, a total of 44 convicted tax evaders were collectively sentenced to 337 months in jail, an average of about seven months each.

The figures came this week from the Canada Revenue Agency in response to a question in Parliament from Liberal MP Geoff Reagan.

Revenue Minister Gail Shea also announced this week that Ottawa is being given access to Canadian data from an ongoing offshore tax-evasion investigation being conducted by American, Australian and British authorities.

Although the revenue agency publishes the names of people convicted of domestic tax offences, it says that for privacy reasons it cannot identify those convicted of offshore tax evasion.

Organizations: Canada Revenue Agency

Geographic location: OTTAWA

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  • Mike
    May 11, 2013 - 02:56

    A more interesting statistic would be, how much did it cost the Canadian taxpayer over the last 6 years to find these people and fine them the $6.8M? Are these people or corporations?

  • Sue Kelland-Dyer
    May 10, 2013 - 15:11

    Should this read "it says that for wealth and poltiical influence reasons it cannot identify those convicted of offshore tax evasion"? Is somebody going to ask for these names through Access to Information?

  • Sue Kelland-Dyer
    May 10, 2013 - 15:04

    Should this read "it says that for wealth and poltiical influence reasons it cannot identify those convicted of offshore tax evasion"? Is somebody going to ask for these names through Access to Information?