Steel from wreckage of Twin Towers unveiled in Appleton to mark anniversary of 9/11

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Published on September 11, 2013

It was 12 years ago today the Town of Appleton welcomed passengers stranded during the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the Untied States. Each year since, the town has held a memorial service and this year’s service included a special ceremony — the unveiling and dedication of a large piece of steel from the destroyed World Trade Centre Twin Towers. Appleton Mayor Derm Flynn (left) and Consul General Richard Riley, who is based at the U.S. Consulate General in Halifax, unveil an information plaque erected in front of the monument at the Riverfront Peace Park. — Photo by Kevin Higgins/TC Media

Published on September 11, 2013

It was 12 years ago today the Town of Appleton welcomed passengers stranded during the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the Untied States. Each year since, the town has held a memorial service and this year’s service included a special ceremony — the unveiling and dedication of a large piece of steel from the destroyed World Trade Centre Twin Towers. Appleton Mayor Derm Flynn (left) and Consul General Richard Riley, who is based at the U.S. Consulate General in Halifax, unveil an information plaque erected in front of the monument at the Riverfront Peace Park. — Photo by Kevin Higgins/TC Media

A ceremony was held today in Appleton to commemorate the anniversary of 9/11, and to unveil a new monument marking the tragic event — a piece of steel from the wreckage of the World Trade Centre towers, donated to the Town of Appleton by the New York and New Jersey Port Authority and the U.S. government.

“I am humbled to be here today as the mayor of this town, and to accept this piece of history which we will treasure for many years,” said Appleton Mayor Derm Flynn.

“We have strong and dedicated volunteers in our community, and this monument will forever remind us of the important part that they all played during those dark days in September of 2001.”

The steel, which has been put on display at the Appleton Peace Park, recalls the significant contribution of the town and others in the central region during the days following the terrorist attacks.

Municipal Affairs Minister Kevin O’Brien represented the provincial government at the ceremony. Also at the event were Consul General of the United States to Halifax Richard Reilly and the Right Reverend David Torraville, Anglican Bishop of Central Newfoundland.

The ceremony marks the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorists attacks when planes in New York City, Washington D.C. and Pennsylvania were hijacked and crashed, forcing international flights heading to the U.S. to land at airports in the province, including Gander. Many passengers were accommodated in communities across the region.

“Today we are remembering one of the most terrible events in human history, and recalling the generous outpouring of support from the people of our province for airline passengers who found themselves stranded here,” said Premier Kathy Dunderdale.

“During those tragic days, our residents in their own quiet and thankless way gave of their time, opened their homes and provided refuge to thousands of our American neighbours.”

Geographic location: Appleton, United States, Appleton Peace Park Central Newfoundland.The New York City Washington D.C. Pennsylvania

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  • Cold over cooked eggs
    September 11, 2013 - 19:00

    I wonder who kevin O'Brien tried to get tossed out from this ceremony. He has more power to get that done then anything he has tried. Like Dunderdale, he'll take more perks out of newfoundland then Newfoundland will ever, ever get from the likes of this puppet.

  • Political Watcher
    September 11, 2013 - 18:43

    I wonder who O'Brien had univited to this ceremony?

  • david
    September 11, 2013 - 16:04

    Yay...more scrap metal for the island's collection! Seriously....get over yourselves and move on with life. Even the vast majority of Americans have moved on. Instead of looking backwards at someone else's history, and admiring a piece of scrap metal, why not look forward to our own future and maybe start recycling some tin cans!?! Jeez Louise!!

  • Mary Nugent Toback
    September 11, 2013 - 15:37

    As Pres Bush said, the world hears you.