Man convinced marijuana oil will cure his cancer

Barb
Barb Sweet
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A St. John’s man who has Stage 4 prostate cancer is putting his faith in the controversial marijuana oil treatment.

Paul Morrissey wants to be able to take marijuana oil (left) as a cure for cancer. — Photo by
Barb Sweet/The Telegram

Paul Morrissey has put off medical treatments for about a year as he tries frantically to source the oil, which he says he was sold on after watching a video by Rick Simpson of Maccan, N.S., called “Run from the Cure.”

The cancer is spreading to his back and lymph nodes, but Morrissey said that’s because he could only source a small amount of the oil in Toronto and hasn’t obtained enough to cure the disease.

“I put off treatment for a year and knew it would get worse if I didn’t get the oil,” said Morrissey, who was willing to take the chance.

“This cancer battle, to me, is a battle of faith.”

He said he was also admitted to hospital in July with renal failure and his next step is to try to go to British Columbia to source some oil.

In the video, Simpson claims the marijuana oil is nature’s miracle and that he gave it away to about 5,000 people for free until running into legal barriers.

Simpson asserts medical, legal and political authorities and the pharmaceutical industry are ignoring the cancer epidemic and the potential of the oil.

Morrissey, on his way to Toronto in December, stopped off in Maccan and said he spent five hours with Simpson and some others featured in the video, which suggests marijuana oil as a fix not only for cancer but various types of pain and a range of diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes. The video also provides instructions for making the oil.

 

“Four people in that house had cancer,” Morrissey said. “They cured themselves.”

The marijuana oil costs $2,500 to $3,000 an ounce in Toronto, Morrissey said.

He said he thinks he could cure himself at half an ounce a week in 30 days, but couldn’t get enough.

The small bit he did take lowered his prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood levels slightly, Morrissey said, adding his pain level went down a few notches.

Morrissey said it’s a travesty of justice that Simpson is unable to distribute the marijuana oil legally and it’s not available in this province as a medicine.

He said the marijuana sourced locally is not high grade enough for the oil, which is high in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

“It’s impossible to get locally,” Morrissey said. “No one seems to know how it has to be made.”

The oil is taken orally and doesn’t produce a high, Morrissey insists. Some claim rubbing it on skin cancer lesions as a cure.

Morrissey acknowledges the skepticism surrounding the oil’s benefits. He said reaction from his doctor, friends and relatives has been typical — that he’s fallen for a foolish scam.

“They think it’s snake oil,” he said.

But Morrissey said if Simpson were allowed to produce the oil and doctors supervise a trial with a group of volunteers, he’s convinced it would be proven within months.

“It will not fail,” Morrissey said. “I would put my life on it.”

The RCMP, meanwhile, reaffirmed to The Telegram that all cannabis or marijuana products and their derivatives are illegal and fall under Schedule II of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

 

bsweet@thetelegram.com

Organizations: PSA, RCMP

Geographic location: Toronto, Maccan, British Columbia

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