Folker called 911 to report Shirran missing after he dumped her body

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Rosie Mullaley
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Listen to David Folker's call to RNC 911

A day after he dumped Ann Marie Shirran’s body in a remote wooded area on the southern shore, David Folker called to report her missing.

“Any idea where she might be?” the 911 dispatcher asked Folker when he called the emergency line about

6 p.m. on July 19, 2010.

“No idea,” replied Folker, who said he had last seen his girlfriend the night before.

The dispatcher also asked Folker whether Shirran might have left him.

“No,” Folker said. “If she did, there would be a number of places she’d gone and I’ve already check those places.”

Folker spoke calmly and slowly to the dispatcher.

The 911 recording — which can be heard on The Telegram website at www.thetelegram.com — was played for the jury Tuesday during Folker’s trial at Newfoundland Supreme Court in St. John’s.

Folker is suspected of murdering Shirran — his 32-year-old girlfriend and the mother of their young son, Moses — on July 18, 2010. He faces charges of second-degree murder and improperly or indecently interfering with a human body.

Last week, in the opening days of the trial, Folker admitted in court Shirran died after they had a physical altercation. He admitted to the jury he dumped her body in Cappahayden and lied to police about what happened.

However, Folker is maintaining his not-guilty pleas.

Among those who testified for the Crown Tuesday included Shirran’s friends — Jennifer Dalley, who finished her testimony from Friday, and Sherry Coombs — along with Shirran’s sister-in-law, Marilyn Harrell.

Harrell, who is married to Shirran’s brother, told the court that on the day she was killed, Shirran came to her house at around lunchtime for a three-hour visit.

“I asked her what was wrong. She looked upset,” Harrell said. “She told me her and Dave split up (a few days before) and that it was completely over this time. He was leaving (their apartment in a few days).”

Harrell said Shirran told her she wanted to be a stay-at-home mother and sell vitamins from her home.

It would be the last time she would see Shirran.

Harrell said that weeks later, she visited Shirran’s mother, Diane Baggs, and was surprised to see Folker sitting in Baggs’ kitchen. She said he had papers on the table.

She said Baggs was very upset and that Folker said, “That’s enough about that.”

“He wanted her to look at these papers,” said Harrell, who wasn’t questioned what the papers were.

But last week, Baggs testified Folker came to her house with documents about access to his son.

Coombs — who was friends with Shirran since 2001 — told the court Shirran met Folker on the Plenty of Fish dating website.

She said she and Shirran kept in contact over the years. The last time she spoke to Shirran was July 16, when she said Shirran told her she was leaving Folker.

She said Folker called her on July 19, saying Shirran didn’t come home. He asked if she was with her.

In cross-examining, the defence focused on Shirran’s character. Co-counsel Scott Hurley asked Dalley about Shirran’s “strong personality.”

Hurley pointed out that Dalley told police, “You don’t argue with Ann. If you did, she’d take you off her list.”

“She’d tell you the truth even though you might not want to hear it,” Dalley said Tuesday.

Harrell said Shirran was strong woman who wasn’t afraid to voice her opinion.

“She moved from place to place. Would you call her impulsive?” defence co-counsel Jason Edwards asked.

“I’d call it adventurous,” she said.

“So, she had no problem speaking her mind?” Edwards asked.

“If she had something to say, she’d say it,” said Harrell, who said Shirran wasn’t afraid of Folker.

Coombs agreed Shirran “had a personality to match her socks,” that she was confident and wasn’t afraid to confront someone.

Testimony continues today.

The trial was initially set for eight weeks, but with Folker’s admission, it will be much shorter.

Folker’s admission last week had prompted Justice Wayne Dymond to observe, “It’s been 40 years at this business for me and this is a first.”

The judge told the jury he has never been involved in a case in which an accused admitted to such substantial facts.

On Tuesday, Dymond explained those comments to jurors. He said the defence had every right to present Folker’s admissions in court.

“Nothing is to be inferred by that,” said Dymond, who added it doesn’t go to the presumption of guilt.

“I just wanted to clear that up.”

 

Earlier story:

A day after he dumped Ann Marie Shirran’s body in a remote wooded area on the southern shore, David Folker called to report her missing.

“Any idea where she might be?” the 911 dispatcher asked Folker when he called July 19, 2010.

“No idea,” replied Folker, who said he last saw his girlfriend the night before.

The dispatcher also asked Folker whether there was a chance Shirran might have left him.

Folker told the man they were having problems, but nothing significant. He said he didn’t think she would leave him.

“If she did, there would be a number of places she’d gone,” said Folker, who added he’d already check those places.

As Folker spoke to the dispatcher, he was calm.

The 911 tape was played today during Folker’s jury trial at Newfoundland Supreme Court in St. John’s.

Folker is accused of murdering his 32-year-old girlfriend, Ann Marie Shirran, the mother of his young son, on July 18, 2010. He faces charges of second-degree murder and improperly or indecently interfering with or performing an indignity to a human body.

Last week, in the opening days of the trial, Folker admitted that Shirran died after they had a physical altercation.

He admitted to dumping her body in Cappahayden and lying to police about what happened.

However, he’s maintaining his not-guilty pleas.

It means the trial, which was initially set for eight weeks, will be drastically shorter, although it’s not clear by how much.

Read full coverage of today’s testimony in Wednesday’s edition of The Telegram.

 

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