Murder victim lived in fear of her ex

Daniel
Daniel MacEachern
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‘That is a tragedy, and it’s worth speaking out against, and it’s worth raising awareness,’ sister says

The tragedy of Oct. 15, when Brian Dawe shot former girlfriend Juliane Hibbs and her fiancé Vince Dillon dead at the Villa Nova Plaza in Conception Bay South before turning his gun on himself in the Anglican cemetery on Kenmount Road, was the culmination of 15 years of manipulation and control at the hands of Dawe, Hibbs’ family says, speaking publicly for the first time about the murder.

Second in a two-part series

 

In Saturday’s Part 1, Hibbs’ parents explained how Juliane began dating Dawe, culminating in a tug-of-war that ended in February 1995, when Dawe picked Juliane up from school and didn’t allow her to go back. For the next 15 years, her parents rarely saw her, despite desperate attempts to keep in contact — a failure of the system the family says contributed to her death.

 

System failed Juliane, family says

Days tumbled into weeks and months and stretched into years.

The Hibbs family would go to Brian Dawe’s house, where they’d be threatened by Dawe and his hangers-on. At one point, said Juliane Hibbs’ dad, Philip Hibbs, a friend of Dawe’s pointed a gun at him at Dawe’s behest.

“It was a very fearful time for us to be going there,” said Philip.

The Hibbs would call the police, who initially would come and talk to Dawe.

“They’d come back to us and say, ‘Brian said she’s not feeling well, or tired,’ and we couldn’t get to speak to her. They’d end up leaving a message on our behalf.”

It affected home life for the Hibbs family, who were still raising Juliane’s younger sister, Ashley, and brother, Christopher.

The Hibbs family made statements to the police about the events leading up to Juliane leaving the family home, to be used if criminal charges against Dawe ever became a possibility.

“By this time Juliane was 18 years old. Why they didn’t act when she was 16, I don’t know,” said Philip.

Police gradually stopped responding to the Hibbs’ requests for help, telling them that if Juliane said she needed to get out, they could help; otherwise, there wasn’t anything they could do.

“We would go up, but police would not come,” said Philip, who nevertheless found an ally in former police officer Connie Pike (then Snow), who would attempt to make contact on their behalf.

As the years wore on, the Hibbs family would only ever get an occasional glimpse of Juliane, usually in a car with Dawe as they’d drive by Dawe’s house.

Once they saw her at a grocery store. Debbie Hibbs, Juliane’s mother, says Juliane held her hand and said, “I wish things weren’t this way.”

Philip managed to slip her $50 before Dawe discovered Juliane’s parents were there and left with her.

“That was the closest I had gotten to her in a long, long while, and the fact that she’d said these words…” said Debbie. “It’s just that we couldn’t do anything. No matter who we spoke to or where we went to get help, nobody could do anything.”

It was two years ago that Juliane’s sister, Ashley (now Ashley O’Brien), spotted her from a distance at the Village mall, with someone other than Dawe.

That was Vince Dillon — Dawe’s other victim on Oct. 15 — who the Hibbs family would come to know as Vinnie, the man who’d helped Juliane finally get free of Dawe more than two years previously.

Juliane had been nervous about re-establishing contact with the family, said Ashley, who suspects her sister felt embarrassment and guilt over what happened.

“It wasn’t because she didn’t want to (come home). But Juliane, after all these years … Juliane was living in isolation, and she didn’t quite know what we were experiencing and we didn’t know what she was experiencing,” she said.

“We have no idea what (Brian) was telling her. She probably didn’t have a full appreciation of how much we were trying to do on the outside. That wasn’t getting to her.”

Ashley brought Juliane to the family home for a tearful, joyous reunion. Juliane hugged her mother and said she was sorry.

“We were so happy,” said Debbie, who told Juliane it was never her fault and that her parents never blamed her.

“Without my husband and myself actually killing him, there was nothing we could do. Nothing,” said Debbie, fighting back tears.

Philip confessed he was worried he’d never see his oldest daughter again.

“I just thank God we had her back. But it was only for two years.”

The family — ecstatic at Juliane’s return — at first didn’t discuss her 15 years with Dawe, and Juliane didn’t bring it up. The family began attending counselling in an effort to come to grips with what had happened, which was how they learned that Juliane never saw the Christmas gifts — clothes, shoes — and money the family had left for her outside Dawe’s house every year. He wouldn’t allow her to have a bank card or a driver’s licence.

At some point, Dawe brought Juliane to work in a downtown club as a dancer, not as a stripper, said Phil, who suspects — having noticed the deterioration of the vehicles outside Dawe’s home and fewer of his cronies hanging around — his income was dwindling and he needed Juliane to bring in some money, none of which she was allowed to keep. Juliane had suffered some injuries in a car accident and received a $10,000 settlement — of which she, again, never saw a dime.

The catalyst for Juliane’s escape, the family learned in counselling, was a long, violent argument with Dawe, during which he dragged her down a flight of stairs by her hair and threatened to stab her with a knife. She managed to talk him down, but knew then her life depended on leaving him.

“It motivated her: ‘If I don’t get out, my life is going to end,’” said Ashley.

Juliane confided in friends she’d made at the club, including Dillon, who worked there as a DJ. Dillon offered her a place to stay, and over the course of almost a year, Juliane would smuggle a personal item or two — but no more, for fear of discovery by Dawe — out of the house to work in her costume bag. She’d leave them at work for Dillon, who would take them to his house for her.

Finally, one day Dawe came to pick her up at work and she wasn’t there, having taken some time off work to hide.

“(Dawe) went nuts,” said Philip. But Dawe, the family would later learn, didn’t know Dillon, and didn’t know where he lived.

After the reunion, the family came to know Dillon as a nice, funny person; he and Juliane had been friends at work and eventually became a couple. They had recently gotten engaged, and the Hibbs got to know his sister and mother as well.

“He was genuinely good,” said Philip, adding the family’s defences were lowered as they realized Dillon was nothing like the controlling Dawe.

“It didn’t take us long to realize that Vinnie and Juliane — it was OK. We were happy about that.”

Juliane was free to do her own thing — a given in a healthy relationship, but markedly different from her relationship with Dawe, said Ashley.

“Vinnie didn’t have to be around. He would drop her off and she would sleep over, and Vinnie would do his own thing. He didn’t control her.”

And every single night for two years, Juliane called her parents between 9:45 and 10 p.m.

Juliane and Dillon left their jobs at the club, and two weeks before her death, Juliane had found employment as a home-care worker, a job she had already started to excel at.

It was a medical form that Juliane needed completed for her new job that brought her to the clinic at Villa Nova Plaza the night of Oct. 15, when Dawe killed her and Dillon, before shooting himself in the Anglican cemetery on Kenmount Road. Police found Dawe’s body with a handgun, assault rifle, body armour and hundreds of rounds of ammunition.

Debbie and Philip were in Calgary the night of the shooting, having gone to visit Ashley and her husband, who had moved to Alberta earlier in the year. Still, news of the shooting — but not the identities of the victims — reached the Hibbs family that evening, who thought, as rumours and speculation ran wild, that it must have had to do with drugs.

Their son, Christopher, was at home in Topsail the night of the shooting — and it was he who had to break the news via phone to his parents and sister — after the police came to the door to tell him what had happened.

Debbie and Philip woke up just after midnight in Calgary to a hysterical Ashley, after Christopher called her cellphone. After running into her room to find out what was happening — with Ashley unable to speak — Philip took the phone and Christopher told him to sit down and get Debbie.

“‘I’ve got something really, really bad to tell you,’” Christopher told his father, and when Christopher explained what happened, “all hell broke loose,” said Philip, fighting tears, while Debbie beside him began to cry.

The family returned to Newfoundland the next day, reeling. Philip said apart from occasionally seeing Dawe in public over the last couple of years, the family had no contact with him and thought he had moved on.

“When Juliane came back into our lives, our train of thought was to stay away,” Debbie said. “We had a false sense of security. We thought perhaps he’d leave well enough alone. We did not spend any of our time thinking about Brian.”

Juliane occasionally expressed the worry that Dawe might come after her, but everyone thought it was natural to be concerned after 15 years of fear and manipulation.

The family has been trying to piece together the events of the night of Oct. 15 — and have been frustrated by a lack of communication from police, who haven’t told them exactly what happened and have not yet returned Juliane’s personal effects.

And they worry that the system that failed Juliane in her life is failing her again after her death.

“It’s a sense of abandonment from the RNC, which we’ve felt all along from the beginning of this story,” said Ashley. “It’s a complete disregard for the family who’s trying to deal with this.”

The Hibbs family is speaking up about what Juliane went through to raise awareness about domestic violence and relationship abuse, and to cast a spotlight on the gaps in a system that allowed what happened to Juliane.

“Brian knew what he was doing,” said Ashley. “He wasn’t going after someone his own age. He was going after a young girl who was very naive about relationships, about sex, about men and women, about power dynamics.”

She said she understands the police had their hands tied when it came to charging Dawe with any crime — but that’s exactly the problem.

“It’s a system that failed this individual, and it allowed an individual like Brian to exist in our society, without any protection,” she said. “He was free to do whatever he wanted. There were no barriers put in place. There was nothing to challenge him or keep him back.”

The system put the onus for protecting Juliane entirely on Juliane herself, said Ashley.

“It places all the responsibility on the victim,” she said. “And in a situation like this, the victim is helpless.”

 

Vigil planned

On Friday, one month after the shooting, the family is holding an hour-long vigil in remembrance of Juliane and Vince Dillon at the C.B.S. Town Hall in Manuels, beginning at 7 p.m. The family hopes others can learn from what happened to Juliane.

“It’s not just the tragedy of that night,” said Ashley. “It’s the tragedy of 20 years of Juliane living in a society that allowed this to happen to her, and there was no help for her. That is a tragedy, and it’s worth speaking out against, and it’s worth raising awareness. Do we want to be a society that allows things like this to happen? If we don’t, we need to take note of it, speak up for it.”

The family is still coping with the loss of Juliane so soon after her return to the family, but will remember with gratitude the final two, happy years of her life.

“Thank God we had these two years before this happened,” said Ashley.

Despite everything that had happened, said Debbie, Juliane was still the warm, compassionate daughter she’d always been.

“She was very calming. In her presence, you were just calm,” she said.

“She wasn’t just the average caring person,” added Ashley. “She embodied caring.”

 

dmaceachern@thetelegram.com

Twitter: @TelegramDaniel

 

In their own words

Juliane Hibbs family provided this account to The Telegram

 

Juliane’s Story

Tragically shot and murdered on October 15, 2013 by her former boyfriend Brian Dawe.

Juliane was born on a beautiful sunny Tuesday morning on January 3, 1978. A beautiful baby girl, she was the first born to Philip and Debbie Hibbs. She was a bright, smart, happy child. She liked dressing up, playing games, and doing funny things. And no matter who came to visit, she would always be asking, “Are you staying for supper?”

Juliane grew to love music and reading, and at an early age she could write short stories and poems. The following is a poem Juliane wrote at the age of 9, after her Poppy Morgan passed away.

Life to Me…

Life to me seems like a flower.

It starts out as a seed. It grows.

Then it is a fully grown flower, so beautiful,

But then, over the years,

Slowly, slowly, its petals fall off, and its scent goes.

In time, after a good life

It dies, and never comes back

But, other flowers come back.

That’s what life is to me.

 

Juliane planned to be a journalist and write books as a career. She was a good student and always maintained good grades.

 

***

This all changed when Juliane was 16 years old. Like all teenagers her age, she liked to hang out with her school friends. It was at one such school friend’s house in Chamberlains that she first met Brian Dawe. He was hanging out with another crowd at a townhouse nearby. Not long thereafter, we became aware that this crowd was involved in what we considered illicit activity. Juliane and her friends were enticed to join them, and being inquisitive teenagers, they did.

 

Unbeknownst to her us, Brian began making a move on our daughter. We became concerned when she wanted to spend more time at her friend’s house and her grades began to slip.

Debbie and I eventually met Brian, and soon after learned some disturbing things about him, which caused red flags to go up. Not only was Brian 8 years Juliane’s senior, but also he did not finish school and did not have a job. Yet, he had cars, motorcycles, atvs, skidoos, etc. and seemed to have endless money. What teenager would not be blinded by what he offered to an unassuming young girl?

In January 1995, when Juliane turned 17 years old, Brian began coercing her to leave home and live with him and his mother. Leading up to this, Brian was always questioning our authority as Juliane’s parents. He wanted her to stay out late on weeknights, spend weekends at his house, and even suggested that she split living arrangements with half a week home and half a week at his house.

Now Debbie and I were trying to intervene and end the relationship. But Brian had become very difficult to deal with and his level of intimidation and control was reaching new heights. During this period, Debbie and I found ourselves in an impossible struggle against Brian, for the safety and security of our daughter. We were constantly trying to balance between giving Juliane the freedom and support to take her own stand against him as a mature teenager, and countering Brian’s controlling influence. After countless pleas to police, we understood that there was very little they could do for us – they told us Juliane had to come out of this on her own. And how does a young girl get out of a situation like this, when her abuser is always nearby? How does one come forward, when she had been threatened and was living in fear? Even her friends at school had later told us that Juliane was trying to leave Brian, but that he would not leave her alone. Another friend told us that Brian had threatened the lives of her family, if she left him or took up with anyone else.

Eventually, Brian managed to achieve his goal, enforced his control over Juliane, and she became prisoner to him. She was 17 years old and there was nothing the law could do to reverse this. For Juliane, what followed was years of isolation, intimidation, control and abuse. Brian took her out of school, cut her off from all her friends, forbade her from using the phone, and cut off all ties with her family. She was not allowed to leave the house, except with Brian. We would go up to Brian’s house to try and see her, but his house would be barricaded – the windows and doors would be covered in wallpaper and black garbage bags, and he would have his pit bull out on the property. He would shout and swear, and curse out Debbie and I to get the f@*^ off his property. We received death threats on the phone and to our face. Philip even had a gun pointed at him at one point. Debbie and I were almost run off the road more than once, and on another occasion we had our car boxed in, and Brian and his friends tried to forcefully remove us from our car. There were many intense and dangerous run-ins with Brian during our struggle to gain access to our daughter.

In the years that followed, any contact we had with Juliane amounted to a by-chance sighting on The Shore. We continued to drop presents off at the door for Christmas and birthdays – which we never knew if she received or not. Brian often threatened us to get away, and would not let Juliane come to the door. On one such occasion, Brian called the police and we were advised to leave his property or charges could be laid against us. Calling his bluff, Debbie said, “let him charge us.” But he never did.

Through all of this, the only constant friend and support we had was former RNC Const. Connie Pike (then Snow). Connie never gave up on Juliane’s case, helping in any way she could, even though she often felt that her hands were tied.

***

Some years ago, Brian had Juliane working in the downtown club scene. All the money she made, Brian would take from her. Still, this job became a blessing in disguise. For Juliane now made new friends she could tell her story to. During her time downtown, Juliane also befriended a man named Vince Dillon.

As time went on, Juliane’s relationship with Brian intensified again, and his abusive nature towards her reached new heights. Juliane later confided in us that Brian had made an attempt on her life. As Juliane relayed to us, they were fighting one night, and Brian would not let her go to sleep. So she got up. He grabbed her by the hair on her head and dragged her down over the basement stairs. He cornered her into the bathroom, with a knife in hand and was going to stab her to death. Juliane managed to talk Brian down. But she knew for sure now, that her life was in immediate danger, and she had to leave him.

With the support of her friend Vince, Juliane managed to escape a year later. Brian dropped her off to work one night at the club, but when he returned to pick her up, she wasn’t there. Brian returned often to look for her, but she had taken time off work and was staying with Vince. Vince tried to protect her. That was about 5 years ago.

For the first 3 years Juliane was away from Brian, she did not reach out to her family. After years of abuse, Juliane suffered from low self-esteem and felt embarrassed about everything that had happened to her. Then one day, almost 2 years ago, her sister Ashley came upon Juliane and Vince at the Village Mall. Juliane reunited with her family at Christmas 2011. The first words she uttered to Debbie were “Mom, I’m sorry.” To which Debbie replied, “You have nothing to be sorry for. It was never your fault and we never blamed you.” As her parents, we always loved Juliane with all our heart and never wavered in that love.

***

In the last two short but precious years we had with Juliane, we learned how much she loved us, all of us, and that she never stopped loving us. Juliane was home, but we had a long road ahead to repair what was once a broken family.

In an effort to help Juliane face and overcome her ordeal with Brian, Debbie and I brought her to counseling. It was during these sessions that we learned much of the horrendous things Brian had done to her. Juliane was suffering from flashbacks and expressed her fear of Brian, but she emerge a happier more confident young woman. In courage, Juliane embraced her new and present life, and perhaps it gave us all a false sense of security. We believed, or perhaps, we wanted to believe, that Brian had finally let her go.

Just 2 weeks before this tragic incident, Juliane began a new job in homecare. Juliane loved her job, and the two ladies she cared for loved her back. In such a short time, Juliane had made such a positive impact, and we were told as much: “Juliane was like a breath of fresh air,” her employers told us.

On October 15, 2013, Juliane went to see her family doctor at Villa Nova Medical Clinic to have a medical/health form completed for her new job. Up to the time of writing this article, the RNC have not discussed the details of that night nor have they released Juliane’s personal effects to her family.

Juliane loved life. She loved her family, and she loved Vince, her fiancé. She never lost touch with the new friends she had made. Juliane was a gentle and caring person. She never got mad or raised her voice. She was always saying “that’s okay.” She would call home every single night, even when there was nothing new to talk about, and told her mom and dad that she loved us.

***

Juliane’s family, along with the help and support of Connie Pike, will be holding a vigil on November 15, 2013, one month after the tragic murder of our precious daughter and her loving fiancé Vince Dillon. It will take place at the CBS Town Hall, 7-8pm. We ask that you please join us in memory of Juliane and Vince, and in support of creating awareness of domestic and relationship violence.

 

 

 

Juliane’s Story

Tragically shot and murdered on October 15, 2013 by her former boyfriend Brian Dawe.

Juliane was born on a beautiful sunny Tuesday morning on January 3, 1978. A beautiful baby girl, she was the first born to Philip and Debbie Hibbs. She was a bright, smart, happy child. She liked dressing up, playing games, and doing funny things. And no matter who came to visit, she would always be asking, “Are you staying for supper?”

Juliane grew to love music and reading, and at an early age she could write short stories and poems. The following is a poem Juliane wrote at the age of 9, after her Poppy Morgan passed away.

Life to Me…

Life to me seems like a flower.

It starts out as a seed. It grows.

Then it is a fully grown flower, so beautiful,

But then, over the years,

Slowly, slowly, its petals fall off, and its scent goes.

In time, after a good life

It dies, and never comes back

But, other flowers come back.

That’s what life is to me.

 

Juliane planned to be a journalist and write books as a career. She was a good student and always maintained good grades.

 

***

This all changed when Juliane was 16 years old. Like all teenagers her age, she liked to hang out with her school friends. It was at one such school friend’s house in Chamberlains that she first met Brian Dawe. He was hanging out with another crowd at a townhouse nearby. Not long thereafter, we became aware that this crowd was involved in what we considered illicit activity. Juliane and her friends were enticed to join them, and being inquisitive teenagers, they did.

 

Unbeknownst to her us, Brian began making a move on our daughter. We became concerned when she wanted to spend more time at her friend’s house and her grades began to slip.

Debbie and I eventually met Brian, and soon after learned some disturbing things about him, which caused red flags to go up. Not only was Brian 8 years Juliane’s senior, but also he did not finish school and did not have a job. Yet, he had cars, motorcycles, atvs, skidoos, etc. and seemed to have endless money. What teenager would not be blinded by what he offered to an unassuming young girl?

In January 1995, when Juliane turned 17 years old, Brian began coercing her to leave home and live with him and his mother. Leading up to this, Brian was always questioning our authority as Juliane’s parents. He wanted her to stay out late on weeknights, spend weekends at his house, and even suggested that she split living arrangements with half a week home and half a week at his house.

Now Debbie and I were trying to intervene and end the relationship. But Brian had become very difficult to deal with and his level of intimidation and control was reaching new heights. During this period, Debbie and I found ourselves in an impossible struggle against Brian, for the safety and security of our daughter. We were constantly trying to balance between giving Juliane the freedom and support to take her own stand against him as a mature teenager, and countering Brian’s controlling influence. After countless pleas to police, we understood that there was very little they could do for us – they told us Juliane had to come out of this on her own. And how does a young girl get out of a situation like this, when her abuser is always nearby? How does one come forward, when she had been threatened and was living in fear? Even her friends at school had later told us that Juliane was trying to leave Brian, but that he would not leave her alone. Another friend told us that Brian had threatened the lives of her family, if she left him or took up with anyone else.

Eventually, Brian managed to achieve his goal, enforced his control over Juliane, and she became prisoner to him. She was 17 years old and there was nothing the law could do to reverse this. For Juliane, what followed was years of isolation, intimidation, control and abuse. Brian took her out of school, cut her off from all her friends, forbade her from using the phone, and cut off all ties with her family. She was not allowed to leave the house, except with Brian. We would go up to Brian’s house to try and see her, but his house would be barricaded – the windows and doors would be covered in wallpaper and black garbage bags, and he would have his pit bull out on the property. He would shout and swear, and curse out Debbie and I to get the f@*^ off his property. We received death threats on the phone and to our face. Philip even had a gun pointed at him at one point. Debbie and I were almost run off the road more than once, and on another occasion we had our car boxed in, and Brian and his friends tried to forcefully remove us from our car. There were many intense and dangerous run-ins with Brian during our struggle to gain access to our daughter.

In the years that followed, any contact we had with Juliane amounted to a by-chance sighting on The Shore. We continued to drop presents off at the door for Christmas and birthdays – which we never knew if she received or not. Brian often threatened us to get away, and would not let Juliane come to the door. On one such occasion, Brian called the police and we were advised to leave his property or charges could be laid against us. Calling his bluff, Debbie said, “let him charge us.” But he never did.

Through all of this, the only constant friend and support we had was former RNC Const. Connie Pike (then Snow). Connie never gave up on Juliane’s case, helping in any way she could, even though she often felt that her hands were tied.

***

Some years ago, Brian had Juliane working in the downtown club scene. All the money she made, Brian would take from her. Still, this job became a blessing in disguise. For Juliane now made new friends she could tell her story to. During her time downtown, Juliane also befriended a man named Vince Dillon.

As time went on, Juliane’s relationship with Brian intensified again, and his abusive nature towards her reached new heights. Juliane later confided in us that Brian had made an attempt on her life. As Juliane relayed to us, they were fighting one night, and Brian would not let her go to sleep. So she got up. He grabbed her by the hair on her head and dragged her down over the basement stairs. He cornered her into the bathroom, with a knife in hand and was going to stab her to death. Juliane managed to talk Brian down. But she knew for sure now, that her life was in immediate danger, and she had to leave him.

With the support of her friend Vince, Juliane managed to escape a year later. Brian dropped her off to work one night at the club, but when he returned to pick her up, she wasn’t there. Brian returned often to look for her, but she had taken time off work and was staying with Vince. Vince tried to protect her. That was about 5 years ago.

For the first 3 years Juliane was away from Brian, she did not reach out to her family. After years of abuse, Juliane suffered from low self-esteem and felt embarrassed about everything that had happened to her. Then one day, almost 2 years ago, her sister Ashley came upon Juliane and Vince at the Village Mall. Juliane reunited with her family at Christmas 2011. The first words she uttered to Debbie were “Mom, I’m sorry.” To which Debbie replied, “You have nothing to be sorry for. It was never your fault and we never blamed you.” As her parents, we always loved Juliane with all our heart and never wavered in that love.

***

In the last two short but precious years we had with Juliane, we learned how much she loved us, all of us, and that she never stopped loving us. Juliane was home, but we had a long road ahead to repair what was once a broken family.

In an effort to help Juliane face and overcome her ordeal with Brian, Debbie and I brought her to counseling. It was during these sessions that we learned much of the horrendous things Brian had done to her. Juliane was suffering from flashbacks and expressed her fear of Brian, but she emerge a happier more confident young woman. In courage, Juliane embraced her new and present life, and perhaps it gave us all a false sense of security. We believed, or perhaps, we wanted to believe, that Brian had finally let her go.

Just 2 weeks before this tragic incident, Juliane began a new job in homecare. Juliane loved her job, and the two ladies she cared for loved her back. In such a short time, Juliane had made such a positive impact, and we were told as much: “Juliane was like a breath of fresh air,” her employers told us.

On October 15, 2013, Juliane went to see her family doctor at Villa Nova Medical Clinic to have a medical/health form completed for her new job. Up to the time of writing this article, the RNC have not discussed the details of that night nor have they released Juliane’s personal effects to her family.

Juliane loved life. She loved her family, and she loved Vince, her fiancé. She never lost touch with the new friends she had made. Juliane was a gentle and caring person. She never got mad or raised her voice. She was always saying “that’s okay.” She would call home every single night, even when there was nothing new to talk about, and told her mom and dad that she loved us.

***

Juliane’s family, along with the help and support of Connie Pike, will be holding a vigil on November 15, 2013, one month after the tragic murder of our precious daughter and her loving fiancé Vince Dillon. It will take place at the CBS Town Hall, 7-8pm. We ask that you please join us in memory of Juliane and Vince, and in support of creating awareness of domestic and relationship violence.

 

 

Organizations: Villa Nova Plaza, C.B.S. Town Hall

Geographic location: Calgary, Kenmount Road, Alberta Topsail Newfoundland Manuels

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Recent comments

  • Sandy Maginity
    November 18, 2013 - 22:06

    I feel for the lost this family has experienced. I understand you can be quit impressionable at 16-18 and I am so sorry their daughter met such a horrible man.

  • Abby
    November 13, 2013 - 05:55

    Very brave of you to speak out about your daughters situation...my prayers go out to you and your family.....Just imagine when things like this are happening in our community and our government takes away things like the Family violence court because there weren't enough numbers..it isn't about the numbers it is about peoples lives... very sad...I hope this story gets the attention it deserves and that more money is put into programs and services that can bring awareness to domestic violence.

  • Donald
    November 12, 2013 - 21:43

    First, my sympathy go out to the families of these victims. From reading this I find that the murder is guilty of the biggest crime. The Dawe Home ought to be destroyed just like that of 'Cleveland monster' Ariel Castro in the USA. I say this in connection to all that the girl was forced to go through at his control. We are talking about a real monster here. How his kind of behaviour can be allowed to take place is unbelievable. So sad that society failed here.

  • Linda
    November 12, 2013 - 21:25

    This is such a sad story of a young couple that wanted to start a new life. My prayers go out to the families. I can believe this still happens. Not sure what justice has come to. ..So often there hands are tied and sometimes don't get the whole story because the victim is so scared and not sure if it will only bring on more abuse.....family and friends need to be heard and or even neighbors. Often they can shed most of the light but so often don't want to get involved. Young woman need to be taught to recognize abuse at an early age. And need to be protected somehow when they are in this situation. But men like Dowe would have to be watched for years. Somehow people like this need to be stopped there rights taken away...

  • ursula jarvis
    November 12, 2013 - 18:32

    my deepest sympathy to all of your family from all of ours, what is strange about this horrific incident was that i was home from ontario on vacation, i was in cbs on the night this happened, my family live very close to the clinic where this tragedy occurred, i had not been there in years, the thing that hit the hardest , after reading your story , is the lack of help that was offered your daughter during her years of abuse , does no one care , could they not ee her plight, did they try and contact her at any time, and offer her a way out , and there are plenty of ways if someone is willing to reach out and inform the victim, dont tell me that for 15 years and lots of complaints that the RNC was not aware of what was happening, give me a break, they are fast enough to get you for speeding, DUI, unpaid child support, etc, etc . I am so sorry that no one tried to help , that no one tried an intervention, not one person involved in domestic abuse did not try to reach out to her safely and quietly, away from her abuser .. horse manure!!!! they let her slip through the system , and now they cant justify the reasons, there was definite noise made by the family and yet no one heard, shame is what they should feel , and be held accountable for not doing their JOBS !!!! paid jobs not volunteers, i am so sorry for your loss .The RNC need to revise their procedures, stop having meetings, and start being pro

  • nicole
    November 12, 2013 - 17:46

    I knew Julianna, and I also knew Brian. I spent time at his house with her and not once did I know the truth. I wish I had at the time I would of done anything in my power to help her even though she was 10 years older then me, she was more then just a friend she was my older sister, someone I could talk to about boy troubles and school. I recall one weekend I spent with her and Brian she helped me study for my finals. I never heard from her after that and now that I think about it it was more then likely Brian that put a stop to it he must of felt in was getting to close to her. I never met vinnie but my thought and prayers go out to his family along with the Hibbs family.

  • marsh
    November 12, 2013 - 13:33

    So Sorry for the Loss .. But am happy family has decided to share story, I was 16 once and got into a relationship my parents didn't like..I got out on my own, its difficult being a teenage lured by the older man.. Thank you for sharing

  • Kevin Barry Penney
    November 12, 2013 - 02:11

    I am so sorry for such a tragic ending to two young lives cut short.My heart goes out to you & your family also to the Dillon family.My prayers are with both families & may god help you all through all this pain.God bless you.

  • Nancy
    November 11, 2013 - 22:24

    Just heart-wrenching. I feel so sorry for the family and pray for them as they grieve. I can't believe this can still happen in present-day society. Something has to change. Like the victim's sister said, it can't be just up to the victim to reach out. Sometimes they can't.

  • Kevin
    November 11, 2013 - 22:00

    Unbelievable how this murderous Animal was allowed to do this . I cannot believe how this went on and was know by the police and they literally did nothing but protect this animal! I cannot fathom the sense of loss the Hibbs family felt for all those years and what they are going through since loosing their daughter and her fiancée? Lawmakers and society failed miserably here! What a story..., the kind we see from elsewhere in the world , not from here! My sympathy to the Hibbs and Dillon families

  • mary
    November 11, 2013 - 20:41

    My heart breaks for each and every one of you. This situation is like so many others and there if just not enough help out there. The system needs to changes. If controlling men knew they could not get away with half of what they do things would be different. May your beautiful daughter/sister and fiancé live in your hearts forever and may you all find comfort.

  • Tina
    November 11, 2013 - 20:21

    I didn't know Juliane or Vince at all but my heart goes out to the Families. I think its a beautiful way to remember them on November 15th & to show awareness towards domestic violence & abuse. RIP Juliane & Vince.

  • Janice Harte
    November 11, 2013 - 20:12

    Your strength and courage in sharing Juliane's story is truly inspiring and a very fitting tribute to your beautiful daughter. I hope that your story will somehow help those who find themselves in similar circumstances.RIP Juliane and Vince

  • Beth
    November 11, 2013 - 19:26

    God Bless the family and give them the strength to move forward.

  • Jen
    November 11, 2013 - 19:05

    I endured 20 years of abuse. The police were absolutely useless and talked to my ex and then said he was polite and kind. He deceived them because that is what he was good at. The police made me feel like the bad person. My ex also tried to run me off the road and the police told me it wasn't worth investigating if nobody witnessed it. The police are clearly not there for women in abusive relationships.

    • Erin Matthews
      November 12, 2013 - 12:29

      Same here. I was only in an abusive relationship for 11 months, but in that amount of time, I recieved no help from the RNC as well. They were really not interested in helping the victim, and implied that I was exagerating. Funny thing is in all these cases if they actually did their job to protect and serve, maybe the abusers would actually get their just dessert. In my opinion, the police always favor the abuser, not the absusee. I think it's partly to do with the misogynistic attitutude they display time and time again. It is evident the police of NL and Lab. don't look at women as equal.

  • santo
    November 11, 2013 - 18:58

    I would like to know what, if anything, is being done to those who aided Dawe during these years. The "friend" who pulled a gun on Mr. Hibbs "protecting" Dawe. The mother who allowed this abuse in her home? Someone helped him get all those guns, someone helped him live this sick life. Many did nothing to get Julieanne the help she needed, many protected Dawe. Many many are guilty of this crime. They all have blood on their hands. How do they sleep at night? No one can tell me that he had all those guns and no one knew. One phone call to the police from one of those people telling them of the firearms he had, and none of this would happen. He would have been arrested, he would have gotten the help he needed. Or are all of these "friends" as controlling as he? Do they think his behaviour was perfectly fine? I can not believe a "friend" pointed a gun at Mr. Hibbs!! Some friend!! Some human being!! Just a criminal.... I am sickened... We hear of domestic violence all the time. I don't get it, why the heck can't the police do something about it before it becomes a murder. Very sorry for your loss to the Hibbs family. And to the Dillon family. If more men were like Vince, men like Dawe would have no where to hide.

  • R. W. p.
    November 11, 2013 - 17:46

    How is it that brian dawe could get permits to possess restricted wepons, given his early history with juliane and many calls to rnc to investgate and bring her home? his threts on her perants alone are grounds to lose all his guns and permits. rcmp are supposed to chek your history befor issueing those permits. do fed, rcmp ever contact prov. rnc on these maters?

    • Go Figure
      November 12, 2013 - 11:59

      I wondered that very same thing. Would love to get an answer on this too. Just recalling the application form, and it is pretty detailed that Mr. Dawe obviously lied on it and the RCMP obviously did not confirm ALL information before issuing the licenses. Wow. Big can of worms opened here.

  • tammy
    November 11, 2013 - 17:33

    sue the police God bless you and your family RIP JULIANE AND VINCE

  • Joy pinsent
    November 11, 2013 - 17:24

    This is so very sad.

  • sharon finlay
    November 11, 2013 - 16:44

    Heartbreaking story,so sorry this had to happen to your beautiful daughter,we as parents want whats best for our children but sometimes we have no control,may god bless you all and hold your precious memories close to your heart.God Bless.

  • Greg Nash
    November 11, 2013 - 15:49

    Prayers are with the Hibbs family but why are the RNC being so uncooperative. Makes one wonder. What are they hiding. There has been very little in the media from law enforcement since this tragedy. Again, why. He had enough ammunition in his house to do much more. How was he able to get it legally? Answers please.

  • Theresa
    November 11, 2013 - 14:44

    God bless you and your family. RIP Juliane and Vince. My thoughts and prayers will be with you on November 15.

    • sharon mccleese
      November 11, 2013 - 21:50

      Vincent Dillon was my young cousin. I never meet julie but I know he loved her. May they rest in peace.

  • Leanne Strickland
    November 11, 2013 - 14:32

    I sympathize with Juliane's family. I have been going thru something similar with my daughter. Fortunately, it hasn't been as long as Juliane's abuse. However , abuse is abuse! The laws need to be changed to help victim's not to continue abusing their victim's. Not only has the RCMP been useless or helpful during my daughter's abuse they have decided to charge my daughter with public mischief . Because my daughter decided to protect herself from her abuser, knowing the authorities couldn't she is still being victimized. She has escaped her abuser but still lives in constant fear that it's not over because we made him go to jail . These abusers are controlling, manipulative and vindictive. It always takes a tragedy to make people aware that this stuff really happens. I'm sorry this happened to Juliane and terrifies me to think of what happens. If only the law helped these women instead of closing an eye to it, maybe these horrible incidents wouldn't happen. Hoping public awareness gives Juliane's family peace and strength. Wishing I could be there at the vigil.

  • Beverly Brennan
    November 11, 2013 - 13:19

    To the Hibbs and Dillon Families So sorry for your loss. What a tragedy. May you loved ones rest in peace. May Brian Dawe spend eternity in hell. God Bless

  • Judy
    November 11, 2013 - 12:31

    I have read your story with so much empathy and understanding. I honour your courage for sharing your horrible tragedy with us. As you were trying to protect Juliane she was obviously protecting her loving family. Unfortunately domestic abuse is so much underestimated and kept in silence that more people like you should have your courage to speak out. More awareness to this form of abuse is greatly needed. Thank you for your story. As a Newfoundlander living out of the province I only wish I could attend Juliane's vigil but I will be there in thoughts and prayers. Your strength of speaking out empowers me. Once again, thank you.

  • Melissa Gavin
    November 11, 2013 - 11:13

    My deepest condolences to the Hibbs and Dillon family. I was friends with both Juliane and Vince. I served as a bartender at the club for off and on 5years now. I didn't know too much about her past relationship only that it was horrible.... So happy when her and Vince got together as they were a perfect match made in heaven. Both were the sweetest people, loved to smile and have funny conversations... Every time I'd see Juliane we would talk about our dogs haha She loved her puppies so much (and mine) The last time I saw Juliane we met up at the Bistro Sophia for lunch one day so she could meet my new baby Scarlett. She was so excited and loved her so much! I will cherish the memories of Juliane and Vince for the rest of my life. It saddens me to imagine what the families are going through..... I'm so sorry!

  • Ken
    November 11, 2013 - 10:22

    Wow!! It seemed the writing was on the wall a long time before it culminated in this tragedy. What was the motive ?...lost love?...or she knew too much??

  • Kevin Power
    November 11, 2013 - 09:39

    A very tragic story and such a violent end to a young persons life, which was twisted beyond belief by a brutal fear mongering coward. My heart bleeds for the families of Julianne and Vince.

  • Taylor
    November 11, 2013 - 08:46

    Thank you for telling Juliane's story , advocating for her and being her voice. This happens far too often and most times the victim is further victimized by the system which is supposed to protect them. My condolences to your family on the loss of your beautiful daughter.

  • tina
    November 11, 2013 - 08:43

    I went to school with Julie ann. I did not know her very well- just in passing. Maybe a short conversation here and there.She was always quiet and sweet. I also did not know of the life that poor girl lived. I remember her being picked up and dropped off at school by an older guy. But I never remember it being talked about at school.If only someone could have helped her, if only the system didn't fail her. Imagine her parents sharing this story, how very brave. Because these are the things that go on that the justice system never ever would speak about. I hope they find all the answers they are looking for and deserve. God Bless.

  • Natasha
    November 11, 2013 - 08:38

    Are there any organizations in this province that are in support in raising awareness and changing domestic abuse laws? That's certainly a cause I can get behind. My heart breaks for this family, I've prayed for peace for them. The system fails many women like Julianne who feel stuck in this kind of situation, often because they feel it's safer to stay than it is to leave. This is what must change now. Abused women feel isolated and stuck, we need to find a way to give them a soft place to land, and feel secure enough that they will be protected when they've had enough and want to get out.

  • Darlene
    November 11, 2013 - 07:53

    THE FRIENDS OF THIS KILLER SHOULD ALL BE VERY ASHAMED OF THEMSELVES...THEY SAW WHAT THAT IDIOT WAS DOING TO THAT YOUNG GIRL...NOW IF IT WAS MY CHILD I WOULD BE SPENDING THE REST OF MY LIFE IN PRISON...MY HEART BREAKS FOR THE FAMILIES....

  • Kim
    November 11, 2013 - 07:24

    Thank you for telling this.

  • Barry
    November 11, 2013 - 04:40

    I believe there are far more stories like this. The cops always say 'their hands are tied'. I feels the cops have one major role, and it's not solving crime, it's a cash cow for the government! The majority of what you hear on the news has the police raising money for the crown. The majority of crimes you hear about have a financial cost to them; moving violations, drunk driving, drug crimes, etc. Now I don't think we should all speed, talk on the cell phone while pushing dope! But if you call them, and say I'm being threatened; unless the person actually harms you, by then it's too late, they say they can't do anything. They say there's no law being broken. unfortunately, by the time an official law is broken, there's no one to help!!

    • Mike
      November 12, 2013 - 17:01

      Well change the damn laws! Maybe their should be a law introduced where family and friends of Brian Dawe can be charged for aiding and abetting a criminal?