Coast guard on the scene of the sunken Manolis L - Local hunter describes ‘wave after wave’ of oil

Josh
Josh Pennell
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Oil seen near Chnage Islands this weekend

UPDATED:

 

Two environmental response officers from St. John's are joining members of coast guard already on the scene of an oil spill in the Change Islands area.

On Saturday, CCGS Cape Roger arrived on scene of the sunken paper carrier Manolis L. where oil could be seen in and around the coves of Change Islands.

The oil is believed to be from the Manolis L. which sank in 1985 during a storm in an area known as Blow Hard Rock — between Bacalao Island and Change Islands. The coast guard made attempts to seal the oil leaking from the ship earlier this year, but recently hunters in the area have been picking up oiled eiders and turres.

On Friday and Saturday, more oil than ever was spotted by locals.

Last week local hunter Cory Brinson told The Telegram about some eiders he had shot that had oil on them. On Saturday Brinson told The Telegram he thinks the rest of the oil in the carrier has let go.

 

“She’s all let go there now,” he said. “You can see it on top of the water, there. Just wave after wave after wave of it.”

Coast guard were planning to use an ROV early in the new year to re-assess the hull but are now looking at trying to do that as soon as possible.

An over-flight was scheduled for Sunday morning but that was weather dependent.

 

 

Earlier story

The coast guard is currently on the scene of the sunken paper carrier Manolis L near Change Islands investigating what some locals are calling a substantial amount of oil in the water and in the coves.

Oil in the area of Change Islands and Fogo Island has been an issue since last winter, when it was first noticed. It was determined that the oil was coming from the Manolis L, which went down in 1985 during a storm in an area known as Blow Hard Rock — between Bacalao Island and Change Islands.

The coast guard made attempts to seal the oil leaking from the ship earlier this year, but recently hunters in the area have been picking up oiled eiders and turres.

Last week local hunter Cory Brinson told The Telegram about some eiders he had shot that had oil on them. Now Brinson says he thinks the rest of the oil in the carrier has let go.

“She’s all let go there now,” he says. “You can see it on top of the water, there. Just wave after wave after wave of it.”

Brinson hasn’t seen any eiders today with oil on them but he did spot a few oiled gulls.

Brinson saw a coast guard vessel on the scene Saturday.

The coast guard’s Bob Grant says they got an early morning report Saturday that of oil coming ashore. They notified a coast guard vessel that was in the general area and they are currently on the scene.

”They’ll do an on-site assessment,” Grant says, adding they expect a report from the vessel later today.

 

The Telegram will have information from coast guard on the situation as soon as it becomes available.

Geographic location: Change Islands, Fogo Island, Bacalao Island

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Recent comments

  • sc
    December 21, 2013 - 22:38

    Everyone except the Coast Guard knew it was just a matter of time before this would happen. I suspect the Coast Guard did so little to prevent this mess because it is easier to let the oil escape than to try preventing it from doing so. I pity the people who might have reason to depend on the Coast Guard that seems unable to do anything but sit back and watch things unfold. Not much energy or effort required to do that.

  • roy
    December 21, 2013 - 15:06

    This is what they have been waiting for, they want the oil to leak out and wash on our beaches and oil up a few thousand sea birds. They will monitor the situation and hope that the oil will drift away. This is not Ontario or any other province in Canada, this is Newfoundland , we don't matter or environment doesn't matter our fish or seabirds doesn't matter. Would this happen in Quebec or Ontario or any other province, I think not.

    • L Mercer
      December 29, 2013 - 16:27

      B.C. doesn't care either - the pipeline will probably be coming to mess up our pristine coastline.

  • david
    December 21, 2013 - 14:32

    1985...hunh. Funny how concern for the wonderful Newfoundland environment seems to have only been around since the word "fracking" was coined.