Cold Water Cowboys premiere one of Discovery’s biggest, network says

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Tuesday night’s premiere of Cold Water Cowboys was the third-highest series premiere in Discovery’s history, the network said in a news release.

Conway Caines stands in front of the Seadoo and its crew at Cow Head. — Submitted promo photo

“Cold Water Cowboys is a true Canadian adventure,” said Edwina Follows, Discovery’s director of commissioning.

“Discovery is thrilled that more than a million Canadians tuned in and hope that audiences from coast-to-coast-to-coast continue to check in with the fisherman fraternity for the next nine weeks.”

The Canadian-made, 10-part series by Paperny Entertainment follows six Newfoundland fishing captains and their crews through a fishing season on the cold waters of the North Atlantic Ocean.

En route to the fishing grounds, the crews contend with rough seas, equipment failure, pack ice and icebergs.

The series features Capt. Paul Tiller and crew of Valleyfield, Bonavista Bay; Richard Gillett and crew of Twillingate; Conway and Rick Caines and crew of Cow Head; Justin Bridger and crew of Carmanville; Donald Spence and crew from Port au Choix; and Todd Young and crew of Woody Point.

The premiere showed three of the crews going after crab and caplin, and overcoming a number of obstacles while in pursuit of their catch.

Tiller’s boat broke a stabilizer, Gillett’s crew had to work the boat through pack ice and had to deal with gear getting tangled with that of another boat, and Conway and Rick Caines and crew of Cow Head found a shark in their caplin seine having to release much of the catch to free the shark so it wouldn’t puncture the gear.

The series also captures beautiful Newfoundland scenery and the harsh ocean environment.

Geographic location: Newfoundland, Cow Head, North Atlantic Ocean.En Bonavista Bay Port au Choix

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Recent comments

  • laurel
    April 16, 2014 - 12:28

    Tough fishermen, lots of action, beautiful scenery. Makes for a great show. But I have a complaint. And it is the language. Swearing like you do and not even covering it up, is very offensive to me. God may mean nothing to you, but He is my heavenly father and I wouldn't curse like that about your father. So I won't watch!

  • Joanne & Ron Sylvestre
    March 26, 2014 - 22:50

    Enjoying your series. Seen last night march 25 episode which seadoo unloading turbot in Cow Head while we were visiting the docks so the couple standing in front of the boat was us.

  • ruth doyon
    March 03, 2014 - 18:12

    I have to say that I found the show very endearing as a CFA Not only was it entertaining and informative it shows the rest of Canada what a dangerous profession they are in and how hard the fishermen work It give new meaning to rest of us as to what Newfoundlanders are capable of. Thank you Thank you Thank you

  • WANDA LEYDEN
    March 03, 2014 - 11:06

    i enjoyed the show tremodously..listening to the accent,,and the scenery..beautiful..especailly TWILLINGATE.....MADE ME ALITLE HOMESICK!!!!!!!!..GOOD FOR THOSE BOYS !!

  • Jim
    March 01, 2014 - 09:33

    Come on, b'ys, this is a "reality TV" show. Do you think that everyone in the Everglades is a croc hunter, that moonshiners are ready to reveal their secrets to the world but hide them from the revenuers? Let's not be so serious about what's on TV . . . after all, it is called the idiot box.

  • Bob
    February 28, 2014 - 17:06

    I did not see this show, but from reading the comments here, I'm left with the impression that the show portrays Newfoundland's old time cultures, with emphasis on language and old maritime dress etc. I'm left to wonder if the Discovery channel is somehow affiliated with the Globe and mail

  • Bob
    February 28, 2014 - 17:06

    I did not see this show, but from reading the comments here, I'm left with the impression that the show portrays Newfoundland's old time cultures, with emphasis on language and old maritime dress etc. I'm left to wonder if the Discovery channel is somehow affiliated with the Globe and mail

  • Former BAYWOMAN
    February 28, 2014 - 10:09

    I use a pseudo name to comment on other more sensitve topics and just didn't change it for this one-sorry to offend....

  • Glenn Stockley
    February 27, 2014 - 19:23

    why are the vast majority of those who comment too spineless to use their names ???? not impressed.........

    • david
      February 28, 2014 - 15:15

      Voting in elections is secret, and that's a bit more important than this. Oh, did I just blow the precious few firing neurons you had left?

    • John Brown
      March 01, 2014 - 15:36

      Why do people resort to name calling rather than address the issue or comment that was posted? Are you unable to have a debate with someone without knowing their "real" name or seeing their face? Speaks volumes about you.

  • Glenn Stockley
    February 27, 2014 - 19:21

    Why are the vast majority of comments from people too spineless to use their real names ????

    • John Brown
      March 01, 2014 - 15:30

      A better question is "why do you need to know their names?"

  • Former BAYWOMAN
    February 27, 2014 - 15:51

    LOVED it! And I did like/appreciate the subtitles which I chuckled about-it's not about 'that they do speak English' but we/they speak very fast and it's easy to miss some of the words/conversation. It had a Duck Dynasty feel to it for me and I look forward to more episodes. The b'ys did us proud!

  • Leo
    February 27, 2014 - 15:29

    What another Newfie joke, everyone in the first episode was portrayed as toothless, smoking, beer guzzling idiots that didn't have a clue or any sense regarding safety or fishing ability. WIth the exception of Gillets, all the boats were disasters waiting to happen. Where is Transport Canada and Workers Comp investigators now?

    • Fisherman
      March 02, 2014 - 13:07

      Leo, you got it all wrong my friend, these are hard working Newfoundlanders. I know some of them they don't drink. In the fall of the year a lot of fishing boats that looked new in the spring, then after working all summer fishing starts to look shabby. Anyway with the low quotas and the low price these Fish Harvesters receive for their fish its a wonder they could do any maintenance to their vessels. Just relax and enjoy the show for what its worth, it entertainment. If you don't like it change channels.

  • Changing Direction
    February 27, 2014 - 13:23

    You know what the really sad part is? Thanks to the booming economy, stylish tourist ads, and Republic of Doyle, Newfoundland was actually looking "cool." Let's be honest: There are a lot of postive and negative stereotypes of Newfoundlanders, but being cool was never really one of them. Outsiders see Newfoundladners as kind, good-natured, and all of that, but they never saw us as cool. Things like ROD and oil money changed that. In Canada's big cities and small towns alike, we were suddenly kind of stylish! It was kind of neat to be seen that way for a change, and in some places, anything Newfoundland (art, books, or music...) was fashionable. I'm not sure this new show really keeps Newfoundlanders going in the same direction.

    • Jargin
      February 27, 2014 - 13:31

      Kardashians watchers= Fish stick eaters Fish sticks = Fish Fish =Fishermen Kardashians = Fisherman Televi$ion Gold, The math is obvious.

    • david
      February 27, 2014 - 14:03

      CD: Today's Newfoundland (well, Avalon) is not so much 'cool' as it is shallow, fraudulent and self-absorbed. Danny really did make a difference.

    • ivy
      March 07, 2014 - 17:02

      This is a true portrayal of hardworking Newfoundland and Labradorians. The tourist ads and Republic of Doyle were never true depictions of this great island. NL consists of more than a few brightly coloured row houses in St. Johns and the booming economy only benefits very few people.

    • ivy
      March 07, 2014 - 17:03

      This is a true portrayal of hardworking Newfoundland and Labradorians. The tourist ads and Republic of Doyle were never true depictions of this great island. NL consists of more than a few brightly coloured row houses in St. Johns and the booming economy only benefits very few people.

  • Redgrave
    February 27, 2014 - 12:46

    Breeding any child to be in a profession where death can come so easy , should be a criminal offence. For anyone to say "I had it bred into me" can only mean they were shut out from the real world, and real professions that don't involve boat loads of smelly dead fish. The smartest guys in this series is the film crew, whom I'm sure would rather be anywhere else on earth, other than the North Atlantic with a bunch of "bred" fishermen. Those fish cost the Canadian taxpayer millions fixing all their mess with sunken ships and the extremely high cost rescue missions--not to mention the pensions for the hundreds of widowed mothers. I "bred" my kids to be whatever they want--as it should be.

    • Jargin
      February 27, 2014 - 13:10

      would you like a glass of "whine" with your fish ? The fact that you "bred" is disappointing. Next thing, you'll saying oil sands are a bad thing. These guys are awesome. You should to turn in your man card or get back to the kitchen, whichever applies.

    • Dave Westman
      February 27, 2014 - 18:53

      Kathleen Wynne! is that you?

    • vrp
      February 27, 2014 - 21:50

      Too literal to understand that language can be idiomatic? To slow to recognize hyperbole? And, that stuff called "food" that you pick up at the supermarket is not manufactured in a fail safe, antiseptic, environment in the back of the shop.

  • scott
    February 27, 2014 - 12:39

    This show is a farce and does nothing but portray Newfoundlander and Labradorean's as fools. What does the sou-wester wearing guy add to the show other than poke fun at us all..

    • seanoairborne
      February 27, 2014 - 16:19

      The sou-wester is worn by fishermen throughout North America.Not just Newfoundland!

    • Alex
      February 27, 2014 - 19:21

      Amen to that Scott, I am glad someone else seen through the BS. Seeing the rest of Canada thinks all we do down here fish and drink I guess discovery thought it fitting ending to have a bunch of newfies standing on the deck of a boat drinking. I am sure discovery made sure that none of them drove home after they were finished filming.

  • scott
    February 27, 2014 - 12:37

    This show is a farce and does nothing but portray Newfoundlander and Labradorean's as fools. What does the sou-wester wearing guy add to the show other than poke fun at us all..

    • Sha
      February 27, 2014 - 15:42

      This show is an accurate portrayal of a select group of Newfoundlanders & Labradorean's, they are called fish harvesters and you can find them in almost every outpost and even in St.john's. One of these so called fish harvesters is Conway Caines, the man in the sou-wester, and he does a fine job of representing us as people. Conway is like 90% of all Newfoundlanders, hardworking, comical and speaks with an accent. Conway shows that work dosn't need to be boring and you can actually enjoy it. The ability to laugh at hardship is a sign of a well adjusted, intelligent person. If you have never met a person like Conway anywhere in Newfoundland then your probably on the the wrong island.

    • Fisherman's Daughter
      March 05, 2014 - 12:51

      As a person whose father was a commercial fishermen and who considers the men of this show some of the finest people in the province those of you who express embarrassment at their being Newfoundlanders should be ashamed of yourselves! These are the remnants of a group of men who built this province and the industry that sustained it for centuries. There is nothing to be ashamed of in being a fishermen or a Newfoundlander unless the only kind of Newfoundlander you approved of is the kind with silk hankies and sanitized dialects. Get over yourselves. My father was the most intelligent person I've ever known, spoke Latin, recited Shakespeare and fished off the Funk Islands with a thick Dorset dialect in a Long Liner and I'll be damned if I let those of you who see him as some sort of stereotype because he wore rubber clothes and a Cape Anne in the conduct of his industry sully his memory or that of any fisherman who ever plied their trade off the coast of this province. There only stereotype here, just very real hard working men in their very real fishing boats. Those cod fillets on your plate didn't jump out of the ocean into the au gratin all by themselves. It's you who should be embarrassed.

    • Fisherman's Daughter
      March 05, 2014 - 12:53

      As a person whose father was a commercial fishermen and who considers the men of this show some of the finest people in the province those of you who express embarrassment at their being Newfoundlanders should be ashamed of yourselves! These are the remnants of a group of men who built this province and the industry that sustained it for centuries. There is nothing to be ashamed of in being a fishermen or a Newfoundlander unless the only kind of Newfoundlander you approved of is the kind with silk hankies and sanitized dialects. Get over yourselves. My father was the most intelligent person I've ever known, spoke Latin, recited Shakespeare and fished off the Funk Islands with a thick Dorset dialect in a Long Liner and I'll be damned if I let those of you who see him as some sort of stereotype because he wore rubber clothes and a Cape Anne in the conduct of his industry sully his memory or that of any fisherman who ever plied their trade off the coast of this province. There is no stereotype here, just very real hard working men in their very real fishing boats. Those cod fillets on your plate didn't jump out of the ocean into the au gratin all by themselves. It's you who should be embarrassed.

  • Elsie Demmer
    February 27, 2014 - 10:54

    Will this be available in the US?