Arrest warrant issued for Leo Crockwell

Rosie
Rosie Mullaley
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

A St. John's judge is making sure Leo Crockwell makes it to court — even if he has to be taken into custody to get there.

Leo Crockwell.

Judge Lois Skanes issued an arrest warrant for the 60-year-old Monday after he failed to show up for his trial.

Crockwell — who made national headlines in 2010 when he slipped past police in standoff at his Bay Bulls home — was supposed to be in provincial court in St. John's to answer to a charge of breaching a court order.

But when it became obvious Crockwell wouldn't be there, the judge issued the arrest warrant.

Crockwell's trial was initially set to begin March 2, but was set over when he didn't show.

At that time, defence lawyer Nick Westera said Crockwell had requested that the trial go ahead without him, to which prosecutor Elizabeth Ivany had no objections.

But Judge Colin Flynn insisted Crockwell be there and the trial was set over until Monday.

On Monday, Skanes made the same order.

Crockwell has pleaded not guilty to the charge, which alleges that between June 16 and June 26, 2014, he “did without reasonable excuse, fail to comply” with a court order. It doesn't indicate what the order was.

Westera also asked Monday to be taken off the case. He told the judge there has been some contact with Legal Aid to get another lawyer for Crockwell.

However, Skanes told Westera that, given the history of this case and until an arrest warrant is executed and a new lawyer is put in place, he should stay on the case.

“There’s a history here," she said. "He could show up and change his mind."

As of court closing time Monday, Crockwell had not arrived.

On June 1, 2012, he was convicted of firearms charges as a result of an eight-day standoff with the RCMP in December 2010.

On Feb. 15, 2013, he was sentenced to a global sentence of four years (1,460 days), with three years’ probation. Crockwell was given straight-time credit for the 797 days he’d already spent in custody.

With prisoners normally serving the provincial standard two-thirds of their sentence, he wasn’t scheduled to be released until May 2014.

However, Crockwell filed an application, claiming his sentence was miscalculated and that he should be freed earlier.

A Newfoundland Supreme Court judge agreed and ruled that calculating Crockwell’s release date should have been based on his total four-year sentence because that was the mandatory minimum for the charges, according to the Criminal Code of Canada.

Crockwell was released in December 2013 as a result, but the Crown successfully appealed that decision.

In December 2015, the Newfoundland Court of Appeal said Crockwell’s release date should have been based on two-thirds of the remaining time he had left to serve on his term and not on two-thirds of his total sentence.

rmullaley@thetelegram.com

Twitter: TelyCourt

Earlier story:

Warrant issued for Leo Crockwell’s arrest after no show in court

A warrant has been issued for the arrest of Leo Crockwell, a man who made national headlines more than five years ago when he slipped past police during a standoff in Bay Bulls.

Crockwell was supposed to show up today in provincial court for a trial on breaching a court order, but was a no show, that’s after a judge requested his appearance at his last court date, March 2.

The 60-year-old Crockwell has pleaded not guilty to the charge, which alleges that between June 16 and June 26, 2014, he “did without reasonable excuse, fail to comply” with a court order.

Related story:

Leo Crockwell a no-show for trial

Defence lawyer Nick Westera asked Monday to be taken off the case. He told the judge there has been some contact with Legal Aid to get another lawyer for Crockwell.

However, Judge Lois Skanes told Westera, given the history of this case and until an arrest warrant is executed, he should stay on the case. “There’s a history here. He could show up and change his mind,” Skanes said.

On June 1, 2012, Crockwell was convicted of firearms charges as a result of an eight-day standoff with the RCMP in December 2010.

On Feb. 15, 2013, he was sentenced to a global sentence of four years (1,460 days), with three years’ probation. Crockwell was given straight-time credit for the 797 days he’d already spent in custody.

With prisoners normally serving the provincial standard two-thirds of their sentence, he wasn’t scheduled to be released until May 2014.

However, Crockwell filed an application, claiming his sentence was miscalculated and that he should be freed earlier.

A Newfoundland Supreme Court judge agreed and ruled that calculating Crockwell’s release date should have been based on his total four-year sentence because that was the mandatory minimum for the charges, according to the Criminal Code of Canada.

Crockwell was released in December 2013 as a result, but the Crown successfully appealed that decision.

In December 2015, the Newfoundland Court of Appeal said Crockwell’s release date should have been based on two-thirds of the remaining time he had left to serve on his term and not on two-thirds of his total sentence.

rmullaley@thetelegram.com

Organizations: RCMP, Newfoundland Court

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • Ron
    March 29, 2016 - 18:03

    Does the RCMP and the justice system have nothing else to do. There are murderers and rapists walking around free and trials being delayed for years because the RCMP cannot get time to complete their investigations. At the same time they have spent years crucifying this man because he made them look like fools which was not a difficult job. Get off his case and leave him alone and go after the real criminals and the drunks who litter our highways with death and destruction on a daily basis.

  • Al
    March 29, 2016 - 09:46

    The law blotched from day one. The court is making mockery. Get on and deal with the real criminals. Leo has answered the charge. God thing hanging has been abolished or he would be long gone.

  • Bruno Fast
    March 28, 2016 - 23:17

    As the justice sistem always does and it will continue errors and more errors,even this person is guilty,that doesn't mean that the goverment can change dates as they wish.This person is scared of the justice sistem

  • Ed
    March 28, 2016 - 14:27

    How much money has and will this guy cost the taxpayers of Newfoundland by the time all this foolishness is over. Arrest him and throw him in jail then bring him over to the courthouse when he is supposed to be there. Give him a Legal Aid lawyer and tell him if he does not like that he can hire his own at his expense but that the trial will proceed on schedule.

  • Guy Incognito
    March 28, 2016 - 14:19

    How much $$ has been wasted pursuing Leo? I get it. He made the police look like morons, but when is this going to end?

  • Darlene
    March 28, 2016 - 14:14

    Stop...Leo got you...there are far worse out there then Leo...yes he screwed up...as far as I'm concerned he done his time...he just lost a very dear friend..let him mourn ...if you people only knew how foolish this is...and yes I am from Bay Bulls and no I'm not a Leo supporter...you do the crime you do the time...and he's done that...now please move on...cheers

  • Political Watcher
    March 28, 2016 - 14:07

    Someone please deal with this nuisance once and for all. Either lock him away or set him free, either way deal with it!

  • roy206
    March 28, 2016 - 13:48

    If someone should pick him up...take him to the ferry and I'll stand to the gas...I've had enough...this whole Leo story has been handled poorly from the start. It has cost us 100's of 1000's This is out of control. I