Arrow Air — 25 years later

A quarter century has passed since Arrow Air Flight 1285 crashed 73 seconds after it lifted off a Gander runway on Dec. 12, 1985.

Two hundred and fifty-six people died — 248 U.S. soldiers and eight crewmembers.

It remains the deadliest aviation disaster in Canadian history and one of the worst ever faced by the U.S. military.

The Telegram's Steve Bartlett teamed up with his colleagues at The Beacon in Gander for this special report on the Arrow Air crash - 25 years later.

In it, readers will find out what happened on that chilling December morning, and the reaction here and in the United States.

There are stories about the investigations into the crash, articles outlining why some people have never accepted the findings, and a recap of some of the conspiracy theories.

There is also a profile of an inspiring Gander widow and report on a new local book about the disaster.

On the web, we're asking people to tell us their whereabouts when they learned of the crash, and to share any other memories from that time.

The goal is to remember a significant and sombre moment in the province's history.

Arrow Air — 25 years later
Bernie Caiger (right), senior research officer with the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, and Mike Renton, a technician with the NRC, look over the data recorders in Ottawa from an Arrow Air DC-8 that crashed in Gander Dec. 12, 1985. — File photo by Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press
Most recent comment
Mark F
- December 31, 1969
- 19 h 00

To all the families and friends of the soldiers who perished on Dec 12th 1985. Please know they will always be remembered and missed. I was there to escort them home and see many to their final resting place.

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