Muskrat Falls: our coverage

The Muskrat Falls project has become one of the most controversial topics in Newfoundland and Labrador since the Upper Churchil hydroelectric deal was negotiated with Quebec during the Joseph R. Smallwood era. The Telegram has been following the political debates and opinions in favour and against the project. This is a collection of some of the stories surrounding the ongoing dialogue about the proposal.

Muskrat Falls: our coverage
Jerome Kennedy (left), minister of Natural Resources and Gilbert Bennett, Nalcor's vice-president of the Lower Churchill Project, speak to reporters at Confederation Building. — Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram
Most recent comment
H JEFFORD
- December 28, 2014
- 19 h 00

The power from Duffs Hydro, Holyroods oil fired generating plant, the cost will increase as the cost for oil increases and the supply of oil decreases, The generators in the Holyrood power plant, also needs to be rebuilt ,The Holyrood power plant is listed as in the top 10 air polluters in the world, and it burns millions of dollars worth of fuel each year, The savings each year on the cost to operate the Holyrood plant would make a large payment towards the Muskrat Falls development, There is no cleaner power in the world, or cheaper to run than a power plant using the force of nature to operate, There is no other power in the world more reliable, safer, cleaner and dependable than the power created by harnessing the force of nature,that ran freely for thousands of years and will run for thousands more, The power of the Churchill And the Muskrat Falls, Will run forever turning the power turbines at the Churchill Falls And Muskrat Falls, Clean, Safe,and dependable.

Other reports

Fishing for the Future December 23, 2014

As the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery moves through a series of changes — in leadership at the Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union, in international trade deals, in changing stocks — The Telegram has pulled together a series of stories to place the present in context and provide thoughts on the future. The goal is to spark discussion on what we, as a province, want the fishery to look like, what we want it to be, what is possible.

You can READ HERE what some of the people working in the industry had to say, and reporter Ashley Fitzpatrick's blog offers a glimpse into the work that went into compiling this in-depth series.

Telegram graphic
The Sea-Hawks story November 12, 2014

Varsity sports may get little notice in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Not so the pages of The Telegram.

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Sports
Moose class-action November 12, 2014

There's an ongoing debate about the damage and injury done in this province when vehicles strike moose on the roads and highways. Why is this happening? How can the damage be reduced? Who is to blame?

The Telegram continues to follow the story.

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Local
Parks Canada will attempt to reduce the moose population for the fourth consecutive year as hunters will be allowed within its boundaries. — Telegram file photo
Remembrance Day 2014 November 11, 2014

There are so many stories Telegram and other TC Media reporters, editors and photographers have published over the years of how war has affected the province and its people. From those who fell on battlefields, those who returned injured and scarred physically and mentally, those who were held in prisoner of war camps, to those who risked their lives to keep the supply lines going, to those who nursed injured soldiers back to health, and to those who worried and waited for word. From the First World WAr to the war in Afghanistan, on the sea, over land and in the air, so many Newfoundlanders and Labradorians have served and sacrificed for freedom and democracy. We continue to publish stories our staff uncover in honour of Remembrance Day, and offer this collection to help us all keep in mind the importance of Remembrance Day.

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Local
Lest We Forget