Titanic sinking: 100-year anniversary

This weekend marks the 100th anniversary of when the famous luxury liner Titanic struck an iceberg and sank about 390 nautical miles south of Newfoundland, with more than 1,500 crew members and passengers dying in a tragedy that has resonated throughout the years.

In The Telegram Friday, we have a special eight-page supplement on the Titanic that includes a series of articles and photos, current and archival, exploring local connections to the Titanic and how the 100-year-old disaster preoccupies us still. Here is a collection of our Titanic coverage. To get the full, printed impact of the supplement, click here.

Titanic sinking: 100-year anniversary
— Dan Helmbold/The Telegram
Most recent comment
Dee
- December 31, 1969
- 19 h 00

I agree completely. Reports of ice on the deck could have been ice off the rigging. The decks of the Titanic was some 80 feet above the surface and even the lookouts said it didn't appear to be that high. People not accustomed to ice will call pan ice "ice bergs," so once everyone else was saying iceberg, they just said the same thing. And Tim Matlin's investigations into cold water mirage prove that it would have been impossible to see the berg or ice because the horizon was artificially above where it was in actuality. Another documentary this week also determined that the large amount of slag in the rivets meant it took less than 10,000 lbs of pressure to pop them. Pan ice can do that. A berg would have torn the side off with millions of pounds of pressure. And finally, the damage found was exactly what you'd expect from pan ice...the "morse code" pattern down the side, not a gash. Good on you, Mr. Collins.

Other reports

Lower Churchill Project construction September 23, 2014

The Telegram accepted an offer from Nalcor Energy for a three-day tour of a collection of Lower Churchill Project work sites in Labrador beginning Monday , Sept. 15, 2014. A single reporter was sent. The costs for the tour were covered by the Crown corporation, with the exception of a single night’s hotel stay and a breakfast. The total cost is not yet available. The paper viewed the tour as an opportunity to connect directly with individual project managers rarely heard from to date, as well as more people working on the project.

Using interviews and discussions from the tour, The Telegram offers a five-part series providing an overview and update on the province's controversial $6.99-billion power project, with a look at related topics including: project logistics, camp life and worker safety.

Theme :
Local
Workers inside the spillway construction area on the Muskrat Falls project site. About 900 workers reside in the residences at site. At last update, 2,351 people were working specifically in Labrador on the project. That figure includes the management team, transmission line builders and a team for the cable crossing at Forteau.
Vale in court September 04, 2014

Stories on the court proceedings in the case of alleged illegal dumping by Vale Newfoundland and Labrador.

Theme :
Local
 Inco's Voisey's Bay site is shown in this undated handout photo.