Titanic sinking: 100-year anniversary

This weekend marks the 100th anniversary of when the famous luxury liner Titanic struck an iceberg and sank about 390 nautical miles south of Newfoundland, with more than 1,500 crew members and passengers dying in a tragedy that has resonated throughout the years.

In The Telegram Friday, we have a special eight-page supplement on the Titanic that includes a series of articles and photos, current and archival, exploring local connections to the Titanic and how the 100-year-old disaster preoccupies us still. Here is a collection of our Titanic coverage. To get the full, printed impact of the supplement, click here.

Titanic sinking: 100-year anniversary
— Dan Helmbold/The Telegram
Most recent comment
Dee
- December 25, 2014
- 19 h 00

I agree completely. Reports of ice on the deck could have been ice off the rigging. The decks of the Titanic was some 80 feet above the surface and even the lookouts said it didn't appear to be that high. People not accustomed to ice will call pan ice "ice bergs," so once everyone else was saying iceberg, they just said the same thing. And Tim Matlin's investigations into cold water mirage prove that it would have been impossible to see the berg or ice because the horizon was artificially above where it was in actuality. Another documentary this week also determined that the large amount of slag in the rivets meant it took less than 10,000 lbs of pressure to pop them. Pan ice can do that. A berg would have torn the side off with millions of pounds of pressure. And finally, the damage found was exactly what you'd expect from pan ice...the "morse code" pattern down the side, not a gash. Good on you, Mr. Collins.

Other reports

Fishing for the Future December 23, 2014

As the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery moves through a series of changes — in leadership at the Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union, in international trade deals, in changing stocks — The Telegram has pulled together a series of stories to place the present in context and provide thoughts on the future. The goal is to spark discussion on what we, as a province, want the fishery to look like, what we want it to be, what is possible.

You can READ HERE what some of the people working in the industry had to say, and reporter Ashley Fitzpatrick's blog offers a glimpse into the work that went into compiling this in-depth series.

Telegram graphic
The Sea-Hawks story November 12, 2014

Varsity sports may get little notice in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Not so the pages of The Telegram.

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Sports
Moose class-action November 12, 2014

There's an ongoing debate about the damage and injury done in this province when vehicles strike moose on the roads and highways. Why is this happening? How can the damage be reduced? Who is to blame?

The Telegram continues to follow the story.

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Local
Parks Canada will attempt to reduce the moose population for the fourth consecutive year as hunters will be allowed within its boundaries. — Telegram file photo
Remembrance Day 2014 November 11, 2014

There are so many stories Telegram and other TC Media reporters, editors and photographers have published over the years of how war has affected the province and its people. From those who fell on battlefields, those who returned injured and scarred physically and mentally, those who were held in prisoner of war camps, to those who risked their lives to keep the supply lines going, to those who nursed injured soldiers back to health, and to those who worried and waited for word. From the First World WAr to the war in Afghanistan, on the sea, over land and in the air, so many Newfoundlanders and Labradorians have served and sacrificed for freedom and democracy. We continue to publish stories our staff uncover in honour of Remembrance Day, and offer this collection to help us all keep in mind the importance of Remembrance Day.

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Local
Lest We Forget