Titanic sinking: 100-year anniversary

This weekend marks the 100th anniversary of when the famous luxury liner Titanic struck an iceberg and sank about 390 nautical miles south of Newfoundland, with more than 1,500 crew members and passengers dying in a tragedy that has resonated throughout the years.

In The Telegram Friday, we have a special eight-page supplement on the Titanic that includes a series of articles and photos, current and archival, exploring local connections to the Titanic and how the 100-year-old disaster preoccupies us still. Here is a collection of our Titanic coverage. To get the full, printed impact of the supplement, click here.

Titanic sinking: 100-year anniversary
— Dan Helmbold/The Telegram
Most recent comment
Dee
- May 06, 2016
- 19 h 00

I agree completely. Reports of ice on the deck could have been ice off the rigging. The decks of the Titanic was some 80 feet above the surface and even the lookouts said it didn't appear to be that high. People not accustomed to ice will call pan ice "ice bergs," so once everyone else was saying iceberg, they just said the same thing. And Tim Matlin's investigations into cold water mirage prove that it would have been impossible to see the berg or ice because the horizon was artificially above where it was in actuality. Another documentary this week also determined that the large amount of slag in the rivets meant it took less than 10,000 lbs of pressure to pop them. Pan ice can do that. A berg would have torn the side off with millions of pounds of pressure. And finally, the damage found was exactly what you'd expect from pan ice...the "morse code" pattern down the side, not a gash. Good on you, Mr. Collins.

Other reports

Fire in Fort Mac May 05, 2016

There are few places so far from Newfoundland and Labrador that can provoke a more local response when tragedy strikes than Fort McMurray. The town may be three or four time zones away, depending on where you are in the province, but these people are our neighbours. If there was ever any doubt, these stories prove the point.

 A wall of fire rages outside of Fort McMurray, Alta. Tuesday night. Raging forest fires whipped up by shifting winds have sliced through the middle of the oilsands hub, sending tens of thousands fleeing in both directions and prompting the evacuation of the entire city.
Mount Cashel civil suit April 25, 2016

Roughly seven decades ago, the Roman Catholic archbishop patted the heads of some boys as he passed them in the hallway. Among them was a St. John’s man recently stood up in court in a case about whether the church had a role in operating the infamous Mount Cashel orphanage. Follow our full coverage here.

The Mount Cashel Orphanage in St. John's. The building was torn down in 1992.
The Nalcor story April 21, 2016

The Telegram has followed the Nalcor story since its inception. It is an ongoing story with many twists, turns and the occasional surprise.

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Business
N.L. Budget 2016 hikes taxes, lays foundation for deep cuts April 15, 2016

Newfoundland Finance Minister Cathy Bennett delivered a tough budget Thursday, appearing angry at the Tories who left a fiscal mess, angry at Nalcor Energy and it’s multibillion-dollar Muskrat Falls project, and most of all angry for the choices she had to make. Here are some of the stories from Telegram and TC reporters who covered the April 14, 2015 budget.

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Local