Beautiful losers: Who's not going to pick up awards at the Webbys

John
John Gushue
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

The Webby awards, which honour the best of the Net, sure do things differently: the five-word limit on acceptance speeches is proof enough of that. Another clue: even before the voting is over, you can find out not only who's winning, but who's bound to lose.

The Webbys come in two flavours: one batch is decided by the industry, and the rest by ordinary schmos, like you and me, in a massive competition that's still underway. Both are valid: it's nice to be recognized by your peers, to repeat a cliché from televised awards shows, but it's great fun to watch what the crowd does. Which, of course, is what the web is all about.

Surf's up - The Webby awards, which honour the best of the Net, sure do things differently: the five-word limit on acceptance speeches is proof enough of that. Another clue: even before the voting is over, you can find out not only who's winning, but who's bound to lose.

The Webbys come in two flavours: one batch is decided by the industry, and the rest by ordinary schmos, like you and me, in a massive competition that's still underway. Both are valid: it's nice to be recognized by your peers, to repeat a cliché from televised awards shows, but it's great fun to watch what the crowd does. Which, of course, is what the web is all about.

A curious thing about the "people's voice" division of the Webbys is that you can actually see the vote results so far - that is, after you've actually cast your ballot. You see who's in first through fifth place. Better hurry: the last day to vote is today.

Webbys: People's Voice

pv.webbyawards.com

You have to register to vote, which takes a minute. Why? "It's the only way we can determine a human from a robot. That's why we named it People's Voice, not Robot's Voice." Makes sense.

As always there are a dizzying array of categories and options. Every year, I'm amazed by the sheer variety, not to mention how many nominees I've never heard of. Then again, as we'll see, a good few aren't up my alley.

So, this week, I focus on a bunch of the sites that appear destined to lose when the awards are handed out next week.

Design Observer

www.designobserver.com

I'd make a lousy architect. I can't draw a straight line and I wouldn't know where to start in creating a model. That said, I have a real curiosity about design and how things are put together. Design Observer (a nominee in the personal blog category) is an eclectic find, in which I always learn something.

Star Doll

www.stardoll.com/en

I had never heard of Star Doll (celebrity site category) until I read about it in a magazine a few weeks ago. Then again, it's not exactly aimed at adult males (well, most of them); it's a virtual update of those pop-out paper doll books, where you could fit clothing over various figures. Except, in this twist, the "dolls" are all celebrities, including the ones that preoccupy the supermarket tabloids.

Bad Gift Emporium

www.badgiftemporium.com

"Because one man's bad gift is another man's bad gift ... in a good way." Ever received one of those presents where your face muscles clench as you force a smile? This site (a Weird category finalist) treasures those non-treasures. You can submit your own, or celebrate your favourite finds by sending them as e-cards to friends. That's a gift that's likely more suitable.

Don't Give Up on Vista

tbwamal.com/webbys/giveup.html

Some of the best bits up for Webbys this year are in the advertising categories. That shouldn't be a surprise: they've got the money, the creativity and the licence to be more flippant on the web than in practically any other medium. Toyota's hilarious ad, which puts a Tacoma truck in a World of Warcraft gaming sequence, is (at this writing) leading in the Online Advertising category. But I like this ad for Apple, which adapts the famous PC-vs-Mac series for the web, and makes brilliant use of the parameters of an online ad.

Cook's Illustrated

www.cooksillustrated.com/videohome.asp

"You Suck at Photoshop" is leading the how-to and DIY grouping in the video categories (there are quite a few, which says something about how potent online videos have become), but I picked the Cook's Illustrated video podcast. Until a year or so ago, I had the impression that Cook's Illustrated magazine was a bit snooty. Then I started reading it, and then got into the companion "America's Test Kitchen" show on PBS. Snooty it's not. Fussy, yes, but often funny, too. The video podcast is all about one of the key goals: finding the best and easy-to-make version of a popular dish. Try it out.

John Gushue is a news writer for CBCNews.ca in St. John's. E-mail: surf@thetelegram.com. Read past Surf's Up columns and daily updates at his blog: johngushue.typepad.com.

Organizations: Webbys, Toyota, Apple Illustrated magazine

Geographic location: Tacoma, St. John's

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments