Pockets of prosperity

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Here’s a different kind of tale of the tape — one told with the latest unemployment numbers across the country, and one that shows just how uneven economic prosperity can be.

First, the “seasonally adjusted, three-month moving average unemployment rates for major cities,” numbers that Statistics Canada “cautions the figures may fluctuate widely because they are based on small statistical samples.” (Previous month in brackets.)

— St. John’s 5.7 (6.0)

— Halifax 6.2 (6.3)

— Moncton, N.B. 7.9 (7.3)

— Saint John, N.B. 10.5 (10.9)

— Saguenay, 8.2 (7.7)

— Quebec City 4.8 (4.8)

— Sherbrooke, 7.8 (7.7)

— Trois-Rivières 9.6 (9.9)

— Montreal 8.4 (8.2)

— Gatineau 6.0 (6.3)

— Ottawa 7.1 (6.8)

— Kingston, Ont. 6.7 (6.6)

— Peterborough, Ont. 8.8 (9.6)

— Oshawa, Ont. 6.5 (6.4)

— Toronto 7.8 (7.8)

— Hamilton, Ont. 6.5 (6.0)

— St. Catharines-Niagara, Ont. 8.6 (8.3)

— Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, Ont. 8.0 (8.0)

— Brantford, Ont. 6.9 (6.7)

— Guelph, Ont. 7.2 (7.7)

— London, Ont. 8.3 (8.6)

— Windsor, Ont. 8.9 (9.2)

— Barrie, Ont. 7.9 (8.6)

— Sudbury, Ont. 6.6 (6.9)

— Thunder Bay, Ont. 6.1 (6.0)

— Winnipeg 5.9 (6.2)

— Regina 2.9 (3.5)

— Saskatoon 4.3 (3.9)

— Calgary 5.0 (5.3)

— Edmonton 5.2 (4.8)

— Kelowna, B.C. 7.2 (8.4)

— Abbotsford, B.C. 7.9 (8.1)

— Vancouver 6.8 (6.6)

— Victoria 5.7 (5.8)

Those numbers look grand: St. John’s with the lowest numbers practically until you hit the Prairies, and on par or better than B.C.

Then look at the provincial numbers:

— Newfoundland 10.7 (11.4)

— Prince Edward Island 10.6 (11.8)

— Nova Scotia 8.7 (9.0)

— New Brunswick 10.7 (10.2)

— Quebec 7.9 (8.2)

— Ontario 7.5 (7.6)

— Manitoba 5.2 (5.5)

— Saskatchewan 4.2 (4.0)

— Alberta 4.8 (4.5)

— British Columbia 6.6 (6.7)

What do you see? As a province, we’re still tied for the worst numbers in the nation.

Could it be any more clear that prosperity still seems to end at the overpass?

Organizations: Statistics Canada

Geographic location: Quebec City, Moncton, Saint John Trois-Rivières Montreal Ottawa Kingston Peterborough Oshawa Toronto Guelph London, Ont. Windsor Barrie Sudbury Thunder Bay Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary Edmonton Kelowna Abbotsford Vancouver Nova Scotia Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia

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Recent comments

  • saelcove
    September 10, 2013 - 10:14

    That,s how it works when you count people who live outside the province into the numbers it makes them look better than they are

  • Too Funny
    September 10, 2013 - 08:08

    "Could it be any more clear that prosperity still seems to end at the overpass?" Yeah, and looking at those figures there seems to be an "overpass" in every province. Is that just a coincidence or is that urban areas tend to provide more employment opportunities. And can it really be called a "pocket" when it holds a third of the population.

  • Wild Rose
    September 10, 2013 - 07:45

    The numbers are that way because the people in the west except British Colombia arent afraid of hard work. They have the Alberta Attitude and nothing will get in there way. Newfoundlders only take from us hard-working taxpayers while they sit around all day.

    • Tony Rockel
      September 11, 2013 - 18:15

      "Lowest cost option"? Now where have I heard that before? You must have been fitted with the same brain-implant as Ed Martin.

  • John Smith
    September 10, 2013 - 06:24

    well, when the Liberals were in power we had the worst numbers in the country in all categories...

    • Tony Rockel
      September 11, 2013 - 11:55

      Yes, John, as long as you and your fat cat cronies are on the gravy train, that's all that really matters, eh?