Terrible treatment of turrs, murres

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Once again, I feel obliged to draw attention to the plight of the murre (turr) in Placentia Bay.  
Today, we must have seen the apex of an ever-increasing number of hunters in our area.  
In the early morning hours of Wednesday, Feb. 24., Argentia looked like Toronto’s 401 at rush hour, with the arrival of some 93 trucks towing boats to be launched in pursuit of the lowly turr.

Add to these, another 25 or so from Jerseyside, and we've already exceeded 100 boats, and we haven't yet added the numbers of local boats, and Mother Nature did not offer any help to those birds with very low winds and little swell on the bay.    

Will this end only when the last bird is dead? Or will those, supposedly in authority, awaken from their hibernation and actually do something about the slaughter.

With the season ending on March 10, we are now coming to the “desperation part” of the season, where all those greedy hunters (for want of a better title), who have already exceeded their quotas 10 times over, will be out on the bay — yes, even in bad weather — to try and get the last few remaining birds for the season.  

This whole thing is shameful; it's despicable, not to mention destructive to what was for so long a great resource. Yet, it seems that we are willing to sit idly by and let it happen. Shame on us.

According to Google, in June 1840, three sailors hailing from the Scottish Island of St. Kilda, killed the last-known pair of great auks in Newfoundland.  

I wonder will some visiting hunters also go down in history for killing the last known pair of common murres in Placentia Bay?

Something must be done, and done before next-year's season, if in fact there are enough birds left in the bay to qualify for a legal hunt.

 

Walter Parsons

Placentia

Organizations: Google

Geographic location: Newfoundland, Placentia Bay

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Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • Turr
    March 03, 2016 - 15:33

    What stupid comments by people who don't hunt Turrs. Every license that's bought as a quota of 40 birds. If my poor old Grandfather can't hunt any more and he was raised up on Turres, I can give him 20 and kill 20 more for myself. Who can hunt Turrs and make money killing and selling 20 birds a day with the price of gas and shells? Government sells the licenses and expects for conservation reasons that all the licenses will be filled. In my opinion all the licenses never gets filled. Turrs mortality is very low these years from oil spills and many Turrs are surviving so much so that their nesting places are overpopulated

  • Baymen
    March 02, 2016 - 18:17

    Most of the fellas commenting on this story haven't a clue what there talking about. Just because a fella owns a boat & likes to hunt a lot means he's a criminal....come on look for something else to complain about. The wildlife people make regulations on the numbers of birds a hunter can take and keep for himself & his family. If he gives them to someone, which he can by law, then he's allowed to go shoot more. Hunters are going going to go to the bay's where the birds are. 20 years ago you could fill a boat & more because there were no limits. Not the case today. I'm all for the fella that can get out but there's always a few that make the rest look bad...they'll get there day yet. But I don't its fair either that people who don't know what there talking about get to have a say in what should or shouldn't be.

    • Paddy
      April 07, 2016 - 18:16

      Hey bay man I to am a bayman and I grew up in placentia bay and most of the people that hunt don't do it for food for them selves but hunt just for the fun of it they kill hundred of turrs keep so many and sell some what they can't sell then wiil go in the garbage next season ..

  • Baymen
    March 02, 2016 - 18:13

    Most of the fellas commenting on this story haven't a clue what there talking about. Just because a fella owns a boat & likes to hunt a lot means he's a criminal....come on look for something else to complain about. The wildlife people make regulations on the numbers of birds a hunter can take and keep for himself & his family. If he gives them to someone, which he can by law, then he's allowed to go shoot more. Hunters are going going to go to the bay's where the birds are. 20 years ago you could fill a boat & more because there were no limits. Not the case today. I'm all for the fella that can get out but there's always a few that make the rest look bad...they'll get there day yet. But I don't its fair either that people who don't know what there talking about get to have a say in what should or shouldn't be.

  • Ron
    March 01, 2016 - 19:51

    Typical of out newfoundland culture. If it is free take it wither you need it or not. We are a very greedy people who will kill everything that breathes if we get the opportunity. This is the reason why we cannot have an open fishery like they do in NS. If there was one cod left every fishing boat in the island would be chasing it all over the bay trying to kill it. Same for the turrs and anything else that breathes. I once saw someone dump out three large freezers full of turrs and then started to go out looking for more. We are a selfish and greedy people , its part of who we are unfortunately. If it moves kill it is part of the newfoundland culture and if it is free take as much as you can and go back for more. I am sometimes ashamed of my fellow islanders. A few years ago someone had a licence for two bears , he ended up killing four , two of them cubs and bragging about it. What a man???.

  • Me
    March 01, 2016 - 15:06

    Stand around the parked trucks with a camera and see how many stay. If they get upset, you know they are doing something wrong. Where are the conservation officers??

  • Polarizing rhetoric
    March 01, 2016 - 11:31

    If the minority of do-gooders would directly target the known poachers, we could begin to achieve results. Banning Harve Bishop's song about turrs in the freezer is not helpful. Just polarizing.

  • How It's Done
    March 01, 2016 - 11:10

    Regulation states "Possession Limit" of 40 birds.... But, some hunters are placing their birds in the deep freezes of other homes (ie his Grand Parents; Parents; Siblings and Friends) - It's obvious there are ways around the regulations. The economic impact of low oil prices has all levels of government looking to trim costs by scaling back on their employee levels. ....So how many civil servants do we actually have out there to monitor activity and enforce the laws? Looks like it's a free for all for those who know how to bend the rules.

  • Brian
    March 01, 2016 - 09:46

    I agree that there are some 'hunters' who will routinely exceed their quota, sell on black market, etc. However, if hunters abide by the daily bag limits and possession limits, they are complying with the law. I doubt all 93 hunters are out there in blatant disregard of the law. But really, with that level of traffic in one bay, enforcement officers should be present to ensure compliance.

  • Anna
    March 01, 2016 - 09:13

    These are the same people who have last year's turrs in their freezers. They just like to kill for the sake of killing.

  • Jerry Atric
    March 01, 2016 - 07:27

    Slaughtering anything that moves is part of our culture... same as drinkin', smokin' & eatin' like pigs... & talkin' right queer.

    • LB
      March 01, 2016 - 10:16

      If it moves, kill it. If it doesn't move, pave it.

  • Bob
    March 01, 2016 - 06:00

    Just wanted to say that if it can be abused in Newfoundland it will.

    • Randy
      March 01, 2016 - 15:02

      You said it!!!! Same for the guy who said they kill just for the sake of it,,,,stupid , illiterate idiot NL"ers.

  • Bob
    March 01, 2016 - 05:59

    Just wanted to say that if it can be abused in Newfoundland it will.

    • James
      March 01, 2016 - 10:13

      When I was growing up we took sea birds and seals to get us through the "Hungry Month of March". The crowd today do not care about conservation to ensure a good population. They would kill every last fin, fur and feather till nothing remains - and if they could kills puffins they would target those as well. Same thing with the Caribou in Labrador - "It is our right to kill every last one until none remain"