Remembrance Day across Canada

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Published on November 11, 2008

A Canadian soldier stands with his head bowed prior to the beginning of Remembrance Day ceremonies at Kandahar Airfield Tuesday Nov. 11, 2008, in Afghanistan. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

The families of fallen Canadian soldiers took part in Remembrance Day ceremonies at Kandahar Airfield Tuesday Nov. 11, 2008, in Afghanistan. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

The families of fallen Canadian soldiers took part in Remembrance Day ceremonies at Kandahar Airfield Tuesday Nov. 11, 2008, in Afghanistan. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

Governor General Michaelle Jean, right, lays a wreath on behalf of the People of Canada as she takes part in the closing ceremony of Vigil 1914-1918 at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Monday, Nov. 10, 2008. The Vigil honoured Canada's 68, 000 soldiers who died during the Great War by projecting their names onto the surface of the National War Memorial from Nov. 3, 2008 to Nov. 11, 2008. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

UN veteran Ray Paquette, 78, salutes during the closing ceremony of Vigil 1914-1918 at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Monday Nov. 10, 2008. The Vigil honoured Canada's 68, 000 soldiers who died during the Great War by projecting their names onto the surface of the National War Memorial from Nov. 3, 2008 to Nov. 11, 2008. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

Foreman Dennis Fabbro places flags beside headstones marking the graves of Canadian military veterans at Mountain View Cemetery in Vancouver, B.C., on Monday November 10, 2008. Approximately 12,000 veterans are buried at the cemetery and in honour of Remembrance Day 1,000 flags are placed among the graves. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

David Flannigan (left), Dominion Command President of the Royal Canadian Legion, and wreath bearer Peter Winsor prepare to lay a wreath at the National War Memorial in downtown St. John's today. Thousands of people turned out for the ceremony, applauding veterans as they marched off following the service. - Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on November 11, 2008

Second World War veterans Charles Porter, 86, left, and Aubrey Mclean, 88, chat as they attend Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Grand Parade cenotaph in Halifax on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

Second World War veterans Charles Porter, 86, left, and Aubrey Mclean, 88, listen as a piper plays during Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Grand Parade cenotaph in Halifax on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2008. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

Veterans parade during a Remembrance Day ceremony at the cenotaph in Quebec City, Tuesday Nov 11, 2008. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Published on November 11, 2008

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his wife Laureen lay a wreath during Rememberance Day ceremonies in Ottawa Tuesday Nov 11, 2008. - Photo by The Canadian Press

Canadians gathered in cities and towns across the country to pay tribute to war heroes past and present at cenotaphs, cemeteries and legion halls. In St. John's, Premier Danny Williams unveiled a plaque honouring Canadian soldiers involved in the Afghanistan conflict, as part of Remembrance Day ceremonies. A parade and ceremony are also taking place at the National War Memorial on Duckworth Street. At war memorials throughout Newfoundland and Labrador - in the smallest outports overlooking the ocean to the larger centres - veterans, family members and the public gathered for Remembrance Day ceremonies. In Ottawa later, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Gov. Gen. Michaelle Jean presided over ceremonies at the National War Memorial. In Afghanistan, the families of six Canadian soldiers gathered at the cenotaph inside the Canadian compound at Kandahar Air Field. The families laid wreaths emblazoned with the words "Fallen Soldier." More than 100,000 Canadians have lost their lives in battle, including almost 69,000 in the First World War, 47,000 in the Second World War, 517 in the Korean War, 112 in peacekeeping missions and 97 in Afghanistan.

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