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Recent comments

  • Mike
    July 02, 2010 - 13:34

    You all need to realize that this is not a gender issue, this is an athlete development issue.

    Deidre has been identified an elite rugby player and as a potential Canadian National team player. In order for her to make it to the highest level, she needs the best possible training environment.

    In smaller centers, like NL, the reality for female athletes is that the best possible training envoirnment is often with the boys teams. It's no secret that boys are faster, stronger, more skilled and play the game at a higher level. Danny King and the rest of the rugby lads have done the right thing by putting Diedre in this more challenging environment and ensureing she trains and plans with a team where standards are high. This will give her the best chance to reach her potential and hopefully make it to the next level.

    We are seeing the same thing in soccer where Hannah Rivkin (U20 Canadian Women's National Team player) often trains and plays with boys teams.

    Cheers to Danny and the rest of the NL rugby coaching staff for their continual and consistent development of local elite athletes.

  • Will
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    It is clear that the coach did not want her there or he would have put her in alot sooner ( they were leading 24-0 at halftime ) in the end after the coach bows to pressure from the crowd he tries to save face and be all positive about it. And Don from NL it is time to grow up, it is not 1957 anymore ). It is more than obvious that Deidre Rees has earned the right to be there. She earned the right to be there, earned the right to play, and earned the right to celebrate the victory. Anything else is a crock

  • Al
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    My guess is she threatened a human rights complaint if she didn't get to play.

    Are the boys allowed to play on the girls teams yet?

    Thought so.

    Nothing like a double standard.

  • Lisa
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    How unfortunate that there are small minded individuals who would discourage a young lady from working hard and participating in a game she loves! She is not 5 years old, and is obviously well prepared by her coach and aware of the potential dangers and injuries that can occur in a rough sport such as this. Until this province has a girl's league for her to join, I think it is inspirational that she has the drive and confidence to pursue this. It's strong, determined young women like Deidre that change the world. Congrats to Deidre and particularly to her coach, who should be commended for giving her this opportunity.

  • Don
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Deidre, play with the girls before you get hurt! You don't belong in a boys league and by doing so, you are making a mockery of the game.

  • Mike
    July 01, 2010 - 20:24

    You all need to realize that this is not a gender issue, this is an athlete development issue.

    Deidre has been identified an elite rugby player and as a potential Canadian National team player. In order for her to make it to the highest level, she needs the best possible training environment.

    In smaller centers, like NL, the reality for female athletes is that the best possible training envoirnment is often with the boys teams. It's no secret that boys are faster, stronger, more skilled and play the game at a higher level. Danny King and the rest of the rugby lads have done the right thing by putting Diedre in this more challenging environment and ensureing she trains and plans with a team where standards are high. This will give her the best chance to reach her potential and hopefully make it to the next level.

    We are seeing the same thing in soccer where Hannah Rivkin (U20 Canadian Women's National Team player) often trains and plays with boys teams.

    Cheers to Danny and the rest of the NL rugby coaching staff for their continual and consistent development of local elite athletes.

  • Will
    July 01, 2010 - 20:13

    It is clear that the coach did not want her there or he would have put her in alot sooner ( they were leading 24-0 at halftime ) in the end after the coach bows to pressure from the crowd he tries to save face and be all positive about it. And Don from NL it is time to grow up, it is not 1957 anymore ). It is more than obvious that Deidre Rees has earned the right to be there. She earned the right to be there, earned the right to play, and earned the right to celebrate the victory. Anything else is a crock

  • Al
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    My guess is she threatened a human rights complaint if she didn't get to play.

    Are the boys allowed to play on the girls teams yet?

    Thought so.

    Nothing like a double standard.

  • Lisa
    July 01, 2010 - 20:07

    How unfortunate that there are small minded individuals who would discourage a young lady from working hard and participating in a game she loves! She is not 5 years old, and is obviously well prepared by her coach and aware of the potential dangers and injuries that can occur in a rough sport such as this. Until this province has a girl's league for her to join, I think it is inspirational that she has the drive and confidence to pursue this. It's strong, determined young women like Deidre that change the world. Congrats to Deidre and particularly to her coach, who should be commended for giving her this opportunity.

  • Don
    July 01, 2010 - 20:06

    Deidre, play with the girls before you get hurt! You don't belong in a boys league and by doing so, you are making a mockery of the game.