Another Grande showing

George Macvicar
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Golf Small Burin Peninsula club keeps producing province's top young female golfers

Grande Meadows Golf Club in Frenchman's Cove has produced many good young junior golfers over the last number of years and that was never more evident than last week, when the nine-hole Burin Peninsula course hosted the Newfoundland and Labrador Golf Association (NLGA) 2009 provincial junior boys' and girls' championships

Erin Lundrigan of Burin captured her third successive provincial junior ladies' title. Right on her heels was clubmate Catherine Kenway of Winterland.

Erin Lundrigan and Catherine Kenway of Grande Meadows Golf Course in Frenchmens Cove finished one-two at the provincial junior ladies championship at the Burin Peninsula course. Lundrigan has won the title three years in a row. Photo by Crystal Rogers/T

Marystown -

Grande Meadows Golf Club in Frenchman's Cove has produced many good young junior golfers over the last number of years and that was never more evident than last week, when the nine-hole Burin Peninsula course hosted the Newfoundland and Labrador Golf Association (NLGA) 2009 provincial junior boys' and girls' championships

Erin Lundrigan of Burin captured her third successive provincial junior ladies' title. Right on her heels was clubmate Catherine Kenway of Winterland.

As a result, the two 18-year-olds are on the provincial team that will compete in the Canadian junior women's championship Aug. 3-7 in Hampton, N.B., and have also earned berths on the Newfoundland and Labrador Canada Summer Games team competing in P.E.I. later that same month.

Besides Lundrigan and Kenway, Grande Meadows has also produced two-time provincial junior champion Brittany Cluett of Garnish (2005-06) and Shelley Moulton of Winterland, who took that title in 2002. Marystown native Lacey Cribb, yet another Grande Meadows graduate, was the provincial ladies' amateur champion in 2008.

Lundrigan was runner-up to Cribb at the provincial amateur last year, but is looking to take the crown at this year's event, being played in Grand Falls-Windsor this week. After the first day of play, Lundrigan was in first place, leading former champion Kathleen Jean of Stephenville by five strokes.

Cribb, who golfed out of the Glendenning course in St. John's last year, is not defending her title in Grand Falls as she is living in Alberta.

Jim Stick, provincial coach for the NLGA, said migration to the mainland for work or education has had an impact on the numbers entering provincial events.

"Men's and women's tournaments don't get a full field anymore, even in the larger centres like St. John's," said Stick. "It could be too many tournaments ... and the economy is hindering, too. I find the same numbers are playing golf, they're just playing less."

Not all areas of the province are similarly affected, according to Stick - "In some areas, it's good; in some others, it's not," - but he did note that overall, there is a problem with the number of girls competing at the highest levels. Only nine registered for this year's provincial juniors at Grande Meadows.

"Holding the junior tournaments early is one problem," he said. "The kids are just out of school and don't have time to prepare. But with the (junior girls') nationals (being held) first of August, there's little time."

Stick outlined another problem for provincial junior events.

"It means parents have to accompany their children, needing accommodations for a week and with the drive, it reduces the number entering," he said.

Howard Lundrigan and Dave Kenway have accompanied their daughters to provincial tournaments around the province for the past four years. They agreed it's a big commitment.

"You need time off (a full week), a hotel room, meals. It can run you as high as $1,000," said Kenway.

"It means a lot of early mornings too," added Lundrigan.

Stick says Erin Lundrigan and Catherine Kenway - both in their last year of junior play - were easily the best in their division this season and feels the girls are reaping the benefits of having played outside the province. The two were among 10 Canada Games hopefuls - boys and girls - who travelled to Florida, where they played on three top-notch courses over the Easter holidays,

"I've been training them for five to six years and never had a better group," said Stick.

Organizations: Newfoundland and Labrador Golf Association, Grande Meadows Golf Club, Newfoundland and Labrador Canada

Geographic location: Marystown, St. John's, Hampton P.E.I. Grand Falls-Windsor Grand Falls Alberta Florida

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Recent comments

  • hacker
    July 02, 2010 - 13:33

    Amen brother.

  • Mike
    July 02, 2010 - 13:28

    While its great to see junior golf in the province take off with such fine calibre players and coaches, one has to wonder whats becoming of golf for the older set.

    Golf, especially in the metro St. Johns area, really took off in the late eighties and early nineties and new courses began to spring up to meet the demand. Today, however, that tread seems to be reversing. There is no more lining up at Pippy Park at 4:00 in the morning to get a tee time for the next day. In fact, there appears to be no lining up to get a tee time at many public courses. Its easy to get a round and reservations are not usually needed, even on weekends. I think the mens league at Admirals Green was at an all time low last year and its probably lower this year. Golf, quite simply, has gotten too expensive for the average person. And some courses may be pricing themselves out of business.

    Drive by Admirals Green on the nicest of summer days and youll see that the course is almost empty. (Much different than just a few years ago when they practically had a monopoly). From what friends have said, the number of rounds at Glendenning is down this year. Bally Haly will take new members and the public is allowed to play. But paying $50 to $60 a round is too much for the average hacker.

    Youd think whomever runs these courses would offer specials or reduce prices to get people playing. Its better to charge $25 a round and have the course full, then charge $50 and have it empty. Besides paying for green fees and golf carts, golfers buy hot dogs, sandwiches, and cigars and enjoy a cold beverage at the end of a round all of which adds to the bottom line.

    Not everyone has the time for or can afford a membership at Clovelly or Bally Haly. Thats fine. But courses that continue to charge too much are really shooting themselves in the foot

  • Benny
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Well said Mike, you hit the nail on the head. Go to any other province and enjoy a round of golf for $40 or less any day. I understand jacking the price on a saturday or sunday, but weekdays come on. Clovelly has at least lowered twilight costs to $35 after 4 on the osprey and $25 on the black duck, but unless you get a time before 5:30 you are fighting to get a round in as its filled with mostly - hackers as you'd expect.
    You'd think with this many courses on the avalon they'd charge less. Especially with low member numbers. Who ever thought the day would come when non-members would play on Baly Haly?

  • hacker
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    Amen brother.

  • Mike
    July 01, 2010 - 20:16

    While its great to see junior golf in the province take off with such fine calibre players and coaches, one has to wonder whats becoming of golf for the older set.

    Golf, especially in the metro St. Johns area, really took off in the late eighties and early nineties and new courses began to spring up to meet the demand. Today, however, that tread seems to be reversing. There is no more lining up at Pippy Park at 4:00 in the morning to get a tee time for the next day. In fact, there appears to be no lining up to get a tee time at many public courses. Its easy to get a round and reservations are not usually needed, even on weekends. I think the mens league at Admirals Green was at an all time low last year and its probably lower this year. Golf, quite simply, has gotten too expensive for the average person. And some courses may be pricing themselves out of business.

    Drive by Admirals Green on the nicest of summer days and youll see that the course is almost empty. (Much different than just a few years ago when they practically had a monopoly). From what friends have said, the number of rounds at Glendenning is down this year. Bally Haly will take new members and the public is allowed to play. But paying $50 to $60 a round is too much for the average hacker.

    Youd think whomever runs these courses would offer specials or reduce prices to get people playing. Its better to charge $25 a round and have the course full, then charge $50 and have it empty. Besides paying for green fees and golf carts, golfers buy hot dogs, sandwiches, and cigars and enjoy a cold beverage at the end of a round all of which adds to the bottom line.

    Not everyone has the time for or can afford a membership at Clovelly or Bally Haly. Thats fine. But courses that continue to charge too much are really shooting themselves in the foot

  • Benny
    July 01, 2010 - 20:06

    Well said Mike, you hit the nail on the head. Go to any other province and enjoy a round of golf for $40 or less any day. I understand jacking the price on a saturday or sunday, but weekdays come on. Clovelly has at least lowered twilight costs to $35 after 4 on the osprey and $25 on the black duck, but unless you get a time before 5:30 you are fighting to get a round in as its filled with mostly - hackers as you'd expect.
    You'd think with this many courses on the avalon they'd charge less. Especially with low member numbers. Who ever thought the day would come when non-members would play on Baly Haly?