Firefighters in St. John's douse chimney fire

Staff ~ The Telegram
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Firefighters in St. John's quickly doused a chimney fire last night.
Emergency workers were called to the Smithville Crescent home around 9 p.m. after a call was received at the 911 centre in St. John's about a chimney fire.
No one was injured.
Firefighters put the fire out quickly, police say this morning, but there was moderate damage to the home.
Police will be looking into the cause of the fire.

Geographic location: St. John's

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Recent comments

  • PATtheCAT
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    Oh me god Jim, your some smart by.

  • jim
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Actually Dic I am a certified mason and with WETT certification as well. I build them, I install all types of combustible units and inspect and clean them. And when called upon by insurance I inspect after a fire situation. Most chimmney fires are caused by improper maintainence and I bet that this was the case in this recent fire. Some poor chap who's got a fire going in a fireplace and turned it into a blowtorch due to lack of cleaning. And no, most people who own stoves don't know how to properly clean and inspect chimmneys, liners etc. I've inspected and cleaned enough of them. The most recent post fire I assisted in inspecting was caused by a DIY'er who cleaned his own liner 2x per year, yet in the process over 5 years seperated the liner joint, causing a fire. It's OK to know how to throw a brush down 1x a year. Another is to throw a camera down there on occassion as well. Wind speed and warm temperatures is relevant when a 6 flue is reduced to the diameter size of a pop can due to build up.

  • Duh
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    Well jim from ont, you've now learned to be more clear in your posts and to use the proper terminology the first time around. The second thing you've learned is to not make assumptions.

  • Dic
    July 02, 2010 - 13:17

    jim from ont:

    How do you know it was a wood burning unit ? It wasn't mentioned in the article. It could have been oil, coal or wood. If it was wood, it could have been a fireplace or a wood stove. If it was a wood stove 9 chances out of 10 it had a prefab chimney (in order to pass insurance inspection). Most people with wood stoves are knowledgeable enough to check their own chimney, if not they would need a WETT (Wood Energy Technology Transfer) technician or a chimney sweep to check it out for them. A mason would be useless for that.

    I had my wood stove going last night, wind speed is irrelevant, that's what the drafter is for.

  • jim
    July 02, 2010 - 13:14

    yet another example of individuals ligthing a wood burning unit in 80km winds with a chimmney that was perhaps blocked up with creosete. Pehaps if insurance companies demanded copies of required service 1x a year for an inpection and cleaning by a certified mason there would be fewer instances of the above.

  • PATtheCAT
    July 01, 2010 - 20:12

    Oh me god Jim, your some smart by.

  • jim
    July 01, 2010 - 20:06

    Actually Dic I am a certified mason and with WETT certification as well. I build them, I install all types of combustible units and inspect and clean them. And when called upon by insurance I inspect after a fire situation. Most chimmney fires are caused by improper maintainence and I bet that this was the case in this recent fire. Some poor chap who's got a fire going in a fireplace and turned it into a blowtorch due to lack of cleaning. And no, most people who own stoves don't know how to properly clean and inspect chimmneys, liners etc. I've inspected and cleaned enough of them. The most recent post fire I assisted in inspecting was caused by a DIY'er who cleaned his own liner 2x per year, yet in the process over 5 years seperated the liner joint, causing a fire. It's OK to know how to throw a brush down 1x a year. Another is to throw a camera down there on occassion as well. Wind speed and warm temperatures is relevant when a 6 flue is reduced to the diameter size of a pop can due to build up.

  • Duh
    July 01, 2010 - 20:01

    Well jim from ont, you've now learned to be more clear in your posts and to use the proper terminology the first time around. The second thing you've learned is to not make assumptions.

  • Dic
    July 01, 2010 - 19:58

    jim from ont:

    How do you know it was a wood burning unit ? It wasn't mentioned in the article. It could have been oil, coal or wood. If it was wood, it could have been a fireplace or a wood stove. If it was a wood stove 9 chances out of 10 it had a prefab chimney (in order to pass insurance inspection). Most people with wood stoves are knowledgeable enough to check their own chimney, if not they would need a WETT (Wood Energy Technology Transfer) technician or a chimney sweep to check it out for them. A mason would be useless for that.

    I had my wood stove going last night, wind speed is irrelevant, that's what the drafter is for.

  • jim
    July 01, 2010 - 19:53

    yet another example of individuals ligthing a wood burning unit in 80km winds with a chimmney that was perhaps blocked up with creosete. Pehaps if insurance companies demanded copies of required service 1x a year for an inpection and cleaning by a certified mason there would be fewer instances of the above.