Owners hopeful downed soccer facility will rise again

Staff ~ The Telegram
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Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Gary Hebbard/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

The indoor soccer pitch that was under construction in Pleasantville collapsed late Wednesday following a day of extremely high winds and snow. Investigators will try to determine the exact cause over the next few days.- Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

The indoor soccer pitch that was under construction in Pleasantville collapsed late Wednesday following a day of extremely high winds and snow. Investigators will try to determine the exact cause over the next few days. Here co-owner of the building, Jim

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram

Published on January 15, 2009

Photo by Keith Gosse/The Telegram

In the light of day, Jim Buckingham and John Breen were still hopeful today that their dream of an indoor soccer facility will rise again.
Winds of more than 100 kilometres an hour Wednesday night brought down the steel trusses of the structure, which was under construction in Pleasantville in St. John's.
Several construction vehicles were left in the wreckage of steel as Buckingham and Breen surveyed the site.
A steady stream of vehicles containing curious onlookers just wanting to see the damage passed by the site, impeding the flow of personnel who needed to get in.
Buckingham said he would appreciate it if onlookers tried to stay away so as not to impede site activities.
"One of the problems is everyone running through. There is a continuous stream of traffic coming through here," he said.
Investigations will have to take place to find out what happened.
But Buckingham was blaming the mayhem today on the weather and bad timing. He said by Friday the last trusses would have been in place and the roof skeleton strong.
"Because the structure was not completed, I figure the bracing was not in place yet," Buckingham said.
"This is just my personal opinion. I'm not a civil engineer by any stretch."
None of the steel is salvageable, Buckingham figured.
No one was on the site at the time the trusses came down. Four of the trusses were yet to be installed.Buckingham said he doesn't think there was a problem with the manufacture of the trusses themselves - they were built in Carbonear.
"No one ever expected the wind," he said.
More coverage in Friday's Telegram.

Geographic location: St. John's, Carbonear

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Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • Leslie
    July 02, 2010 - 13:35

    Worst kind.

  • Tim
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    By not being on the site, but from many years investigating events such as this, a recomendation for future consideration would be with the plates at the foundation. The sheared off bolts seem to be poorly thought out for any potential laterial loading.

    This event could have taken place once the structure was completed and in use. We should consider it a lucky turn of events that this happened prior to operation and any occupation.

    I use larger mounting bolts on a wind turbine. It is better to be safe then sorry.

  • Barb
    July 02, 2010 - 13:29

    It's too bad about the wind damage, but its an ill wind that don't blow somebody some good. Profits will have to take second spot for the uninterrupted view of the lake for a little while.

  • Hank
    July 02, 2010 - 13:25

    Who's the engineering firm responsible for this climatic oversight.

    More experts and less professionals please.

  • David
    July 02, 2010 - 13:19

    Perhaps others, as I do, remember a humorous Mordillo poster from the 1980s.....a rectangular island with steep cliffs, a soccer pitch laid out on top, and the ball floating in the ocean below.

    Classic!

  • Former Newfoundlander
    July 02, 2010 - 13:16

    It has to do with the erection process,
    knowing high winds were expected
    temp. bracing should of been welded
    in a manner that would withstand the wind loads. (A steel structure is not a turbine and does not require the big bolts as per the last comment. Could of had 5 DIA bolts the same thing would of happen.) This happens more than people think, unfortunate but it happens.
    I am no engineer either,but from working with structural steel it was human over sight and timing with the mother nature fury of wind. The sturture is design to act as a diaphram in this case the diaphram was not complete.

    Just a rookie's opinion!

  • Leslie
    July 01, 2010 - 20:24

    Worst kind.

  • Tim
    July 01, 2010 - 20:18

    By not being on the site, but from many years investigating events such as this, a recomendation for future consideration would be with the plates at the foundation. The sheared off bolts seem to be poorly thought out for any potential laterial loading.

    This event could have taken place once the structure was completed and in use. We should consider it a lucky turn of events that this happened prior to operation and any occupation.

    I use larger mounting bolts on a wind turbine. It is better to be safe then sorry.

  • Barb
    July 01, 2010 - 20:16

    It's too bad about the wind damage, but its an ill wind that don't blow somebody some good. Profits will have to take second spot for the uninterrupted view of the lake for a little while.

  • Hank
    July 01, 2010 - 20:11

    Who's the engineering firm responsible for this climatic oversight.

    More experts and less professionals please.

  • David
    July 01, 2010 - 20:01

    Perhaps others, as I do, remember a humorous Mordillo poster from the 1980s.....a rectangular island with steep cliffs, a soccer pitch laid out on top, and the ball floating in the ocean below.

    Classic!

  • Former Newfoundlander
    July 01, 2010 - 19:57

    It has to do with the erection process,
    knowing high winds were expected
    temp. bracing should of been welded
    in a manner that would withstand the wind loads. (A steel structure is not a turbine and does not require the big bolts as per the last comment. Could of had 5 DIA bolts the same thing would of happen.) This happens more than people think, unfortunate but it happens.
    I am no engineer either,but from working with structural steel it was human over sight and timing with the mother nature fury of wind. The sturture is design to act as a diaphram in this case the diaphram was not complete.

    Just a rookie's opinion!