Hugo Chavez walks Venice red carpet with Oliver Stone

The Associated Press ~ staff The News
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Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez received a movie star welcome Monday at the Venice Film Festival, where he walked the red carpet with director Oliver Stone for the premiere of the documentary "South of the Border."

Hundreds of admirers, some chanting "president, president," gathered outside of the Casino for the leader's arrival. Chavez threw a flower into the crowd and touched his heart, and at one point took a photographer's camera to snap a picture himself.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez (right) salutes the crowd as he arrives with U.S. director Oliver Stone for the screening of the film South of the Border at the 66th edition of the Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy, Monday. Photo by The Associated P

VENICE, Italy -

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez received a movie star welcome Monday at the Venice Film Festival, where he walked the red carpet with director Oliver Stone for the premiere of the documentary "South of the Border."

Hundreds of admirers, some chanting "president, president," gathered outside of the Casino for the leader's arrival. Chavez threw a flower into the crowd and touched his heart, and at one point took a photographer's camera to snap a picture himself.

Security outside the Casino was tightened in advance of Chavez's arrival, with military police checking bags.

Stone says "South of the Border" is meant to illustrate "the sweeping changes" in South America in recent years as a direct counterpoint to what some say is Chavez's depiction as a dictator by U.S. and European media.

Stone spent extensive time with Chavez for the 75-minute documentary, which premiered at the Venice Film Festival Monday, and also interviewed the leaders of Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba and Paraguay, whom Stone said "are on the same page" as Chavez.

"He's a guy you should meet and get to know. ... He's the star of the movie," Stone said in an interview before the premiere.

Stone said he wanted to illustrate changes that put leaders in many South American countries in power who represent the majority of their populations, a movement started with Chavez. He cited Bolivian President Evo Morales, the first Indian to be elected president, and Brazil's Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, a well-known trade unionist.

"If you look now, there are seven presidents, eight countries with Chile, that are really moving away from the Washington consensus control," Stone said. "But in America, they don't get that story."

Invited to Venezuela

Stone was invited to Venezuela to meet Chavez for the first time during the Venezuelan leader's aborted rescue mission of Colombian hostages held by FARC rebels. The mission was aborted, but Stone said the Chavez he met was different than some U.S. media depictions.

He returned in January to interview Chavez, and continued on to four other countries to interview Chavez's allies, with Cuban and Ecuadorean leaders joining him in Paraguay.

Stone is best known for his dramas, but he also has made four documentaries, including "Comandante," the 2003 documentary based on a meeting with Cuban leader Fidel Castro, which the director says in many ways led him to Chavez.

"I used the real man," Stone said. "I hope you realize how dynamic he is in the movie. What I like about the film is you see how sincere he is on camera. You don't see a guy who is a phoney. He's not a dictator."

Stone had said he spent "several hours here and there" with Chavez. The movie shows him at Chavez's enormous desk and visiting the president's childhood home, where he rides into the frame on a child's bicycle, which breaks under his weight. He immediately offers to pay for it. Footage also shows Chavez driving his own vehicle and stopping to greet supporters.

Stone said he didn't see it necessary to present the opposition's case in his film.

"A dark side? There's a dark side to everything. Why do you seek out the dark side when the guy is doing good things?" Stone asked. "He is a democrat and there is opposition to him, and he's not perfect. But he is doing tremendous things for Venezuela and the region."

Stone concedes Chavez "says things unnecessary to provoke. I think he doesn't have to do that." But he said his opinion of Chavez only improved during the making of the documentary.

"People forget that he cut the poverty rate by one half," Stone said. "People in Venezuela are getting an education, they are getting health care and welfare. He actually delivered on what he said he would."

The movie's screenwriter is Tariq Ali, the British-Pakistani historian who most recently wrote "Pirates of the Caribbean: Axis of Hope" and it was produced by Fernando Sulichin. Stone also was advised by economist Mark Weisbrot of the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

"South of the Border" is showing out of competition at the Venice Film Festival, which ends Saturday with the awarding of the Golden Lion.

Organizations: FARC, Center for Economic, Golden Lion

Geographic location: Venice, America, Venezuela Italy Brazil Paraguay South America Argentina Ecuador Bolivia Cuba Chile Washington Caribbean

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Recent comments

  • Tom
    July 02, 2010 - 13:34

    So does this mean Oliver Stone in on his way here next?

  • Rowena Lester
    July 02, 2010 - 13:33

    Maybe Oliver Stone has a part for Danny Williams in his next movie. He can play the role of a dictaory with little or no effort. Hes a natutal fit. that would be one way to get rid of him.

  • Jack
    July 02, 2010 - 13:31

    Comparing Williams to Hugo Chavez is giving Danny quite some (undeserved) praise.

  • Sonny
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    It's pathetic that some here mouth-off as if they actually know something about Central / South American politics.

  • Another kick
    July 02, 2010 - 13:29

    Oliver Stone is irrelevant in the 'grand' scheme of things.......he is as important as a grain of sand in the Sahara Desert......AND so is Chavez......

  • Phoebe Tilley
    July 02, 2010 - 13:29

    We have Danny Chavez. Enough said.

  • Tom
    July 01, 2010 - 20:23

    So does this mean Oliver Stone in on his way here next?

  • Rowena Lester
    July 01, 2010 - 20:22

    Maybe Oliver Stone has a part for Danny Williams in his next movie. He can play the role of a dictaory with little or no effort. Hes a natutal fit. that would be one way to get rid of him.

  • Jack
    July 01, 2010 - 20:20

    Comparing Williams to Hugo Chavez is giving Danny quite some (undeserved) praise.

  • Sonny
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    It's pathetic that some here mouth-off as if they actually know something about Central / South American politics.

  • Another kick
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    Oliver Stone is irrelevant in the 'grand' scheme of things.......he is as important as a grain of sand in the Sahara Desert......AND so is Chavez......

  • Phoebe Tilley
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    We have Danny Chavez. Enough said.