Starting off on the right foot

Jason White
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A training guide for Tely 10 first-timers

If you are reading this, then you have made the decision to run the 2010 Tely 10. This is my third year providing a training program. I hope that you follow the program over the next 12 weeks and enjoy the experience of getting involved in the sport of running. The running community in St. John's and surrounding areas is a very supportive one. You will no doubt meet many people along the trails and streets during your training that will be experiencing the same thrill of training for the Tely 10. I hope you enjoy this year's program.

Before starting this training program, I would strongly recommend you make an appointment with your physician. Have yourself checked over to ensure you are healthy before starting this program or any program. It is also important that you are wearing the proper footwear. Go to your local athletic shoe store and have yourself fitted by someone who knows running shoes. They will ensure that you have the proper sneaker for you.

If you are reading this, then you have made the decision to run the 2010 Tely 10. This is my third year providing a training program. I hope that you follow the program over the next 12 weeks and enjoy the experience of getting involved in the sport of running. The running community in St. John's and surrounding areas is a very supportive one. You will no doubt meet many people along the trails and streets during your training that will be experiencing the same thrill of training for the Tely 10. I hope you enjoy this year's program.

Before starting this training program, I would strongly recommend you make an appointment with your physician. Have yourself checked over to ensure you are healthy before starting this program or any program. It is also important that you are wearing the proper footwear. Go to your local athletic shoe store and have yourself fitted by someone who knows running shoes. They will ensure that you have the proper sneaker for you.

I believe that anyone can take on the challenge of completing the Tely 10. I always encourage people to follow this program over the next 12 weeks to help them accomplish the goal of crossing the finish line. So it doesn't matter what your background is, you can be apart of this great event. This program is designed for people of any age and ability to train safely and effectively for the Tely 10. I want anyone who has ever thought about running the Tely 10 to have the confidence to take on the training. One of the key points to remember when taking on this 12 week program is that you can be flexible with the schedule.

Training, and some may laugh at this statement, should be enjoyable. Getting out in the fresh air and enjoying the trails, sights and sounds of metro St. John's should be a chore. You may find that you need to switch days around to fit your lifestyle or if the weather is unfavorable. Sometimes you may even have to miss a day. This doesn't mean that you are compromising your training. So don't try to make up for it and run more than you normally would the next time you head outside. You will be getting in plenty of training over the next 3 months to make up for that missed session. The training schedule will build up your endurance slowly to give you the confidence to make your from start to finish.

In the early stages of the program, the focus will be on building your training capacity. If you are the type of person who has not been running three times a week for 20 or 30 minutes over the winter, you need to go slowly and build your strength. In the beginning of the training schedule, some of the early easy runs will be 25-30 minutes in total time consisting of five minutes and walking for one minute. The walk breaks will allow you to catch your breath, ease the workload and allow you continue with the remainder of the run without feeling exhausted.

So do the walk run progression over the total time of the training time listed. You will notice that I use the Maximum Heart Rate (Max HR) formula for every run. I want to ensure that you run within your limits and this one tool that can be used. So for example, Max HR = 220 - (Age). If we were to calculate this for a 30-year-old runner, 220 - (30) = 190 beats per minute (bpm). Multiply that by the percentage to get your upper and lower limits. To continue with the 30-year-old runner, 190 x (0.65) = 123 beats per minute (bpm) where your heart rate should be at 65 per cent of your Maximum Heart Rate.

An even easier way of keeping track of this is to use the talk test. If you are running with a friend and you are able to have a conversation with relative ease, you are probably running at around 60-65 per cent of your maximum heart rate. If you can barely get two or three words out before taking a breath of air, then you are running near 80-85 per cent of your maximum heart rate.

Cross training is a key component of any training regime. It often involves other cardio activities that will use other muscles that will help to prevent injuries during training. Swimming laps, going for a bike ride or weight/core training are all excellent examples of cross training. Last year, I included a workout called a 'Hilly Run'. I have included them again this year because the are a great way to help build your running strength in your legs.

Pick a route that contains three or four hills that are not too steep to run up. Increase your pace slightly going up each hill so that you can feel yourself working harder on hills. After you have completed the hill, continue your run at a steady pace to recharge your legs. These runs will be of great benefit to your conditioning for the Tely 10 as you will encounter some small hills on the route.

In the final weeks of the program, I have tempo runs included. These runs will help you settle into a pace and build your endurance for the Tely 10. These runs are run at a slightly faster pace than your easy runs. If you wish to use the talk test again as your gauge, conversations will be more challenging. You will be able to get out three or four words and have to take a breath.

The easy runs and rest days are crucial in the program. They will allow your body to recover from previous runs while still getting in some training. The easy run days require little effort to maintain pace. Conversation with running partner is easily maintained. These are meant to break up the more challenging days in the program. The rest days are designed to give your body a break from training and allow you to remain healthy, prevent injuries, achieve physiological gains and help you concentrate on your overall goal.

The week leading up to the race, Week 12, you will be tapering. I want you to enter the starting area on race day feeling fresh. By tapering, you will allow the legs to rest and heal up. You will still be running, of course, but you will be reducing your training time and effort as you get closer to the event.

You have done all the hard work on the trails and the roads. There isn't much that you can do in this week that will help you. Trust in yourself that you have all the training in to complete the Tely 10.

So enlist a few friends from work or in your neighborhood to join you. Running with someone or a group can be a great motivator. It seems less like work if you have others doing it with you. Try to enter some of the road races over the summer. They will give you a sense of what it is like running in a road race and the atmosphere that goes with it.

I love the sport of running. I am also very passionate when it comes to encourage people to train and complete the Tely 10. I know first hand the thrill of running in this event and the impact it has on people when they finish. There is always a sense of fulfillment when you make the turn on to Bannerman Road, hearing the crowd cheering, crossing the line and receiving your finisher's medal. I wish you the best of luck, enjoy the journey and see you race day.

Jason White is a personal trainer with GoodLife Fitness in St. John's. Look for his training program for intermediate runners, or those who have been training throughout the winter and have two or three Tely 10 races under their belts, in Monday's edition of The Telegram.

Geographic location: St. John's, Bannerman Road

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Recent comments

  • far from home
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    I have questioned this myself, long before I began running the Tely I often wondered the same thing and questioned many friends who also run the race and no one knew the answer. I would be very interested in finding this out as well. Especially seeing how through sponsorship and volunteering many costs are indeed covered one would think. Can anyone shed some light on this? NLAA??

  • runner-up
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    Good article Jason but I have a question.
    My family has long been a fan of mini-marathons like the Tely 10. We have run in numerous runs in various parts of the country and in the U.S. When we moved to Newfoundland several years ago, we were enthused about running in the Tely 10. As is my habit however, I posed the question as to who is the principal beneficiary of the monies raised from such events. Usually this information is readily available - along with a list of the charities or not-for-profits and the proceeds from each event. Not so with the Tely 10. My enquiries of the race organizers met with generalities at best and a none-of-your-business reply at worst. Now I notice that the Tely 10 website makes a fleeting reference to profits being used for NLAA programs (which is more than was posted when I made my initial enquiries). But upon checking their website or, indeed, the Telegram website I see no information as to how much money from last year's run, for example, made its way to the NLAA or in what manner the funds were spent. Given that many people and organizations volunteer and contribute to the costs of putting off the Tely 10 and given the substantial registration, one assumes that the PROFIT is quite substantial - upwards perhaps of $100,000. Perhaps this money has been used to good ends, but surely the public supporting such events have a right to know how much money was raised and how it was used. It is ironic that a newspaper that is so consistently critical of government for its freedom of information track record would be so lax in publishing information that the public would want to know.

  • far from home
    July 01, 2010 - 20:18

    I have questioned this myself, long before I began running the Tely I often wondered the same thing and questioned many friends who also run the race and no one knew the answer. I would be very interested in finding this out as well. Especially seeing how through sponsorship and volunteering many costs are indeed covered one would think. Can anyone shed some light on this? NLAA??

  • runner-up
    July 01, 2010 - 19:45

    Good article Jason but I have a question.
    My family has long been a fan of mini-marathons like the Tely 10. We have run in numerous runs in various parts of the country and in the U.S. When we moved to Newfoundland several years ago, we were enthused about running in the Tely 10. As is my habit however, I posed the question as to who is the principal beneficiary of the monies raised from such events. Usually this information is readily available - along with a list of the charities or not-for-profits and the proceeds from each event. Not so with the Tely 10. My enquiries of the race organizers met with generalities at best and a none-of-your-business reply at worst. Now I notice that the Tely 10 website makes a fleeting reference to profits being used for NLAA programs (which is more than was posted when I made my initial enquiries). But upon checking their website or, indeed, the Telegram website I see no information as to how much money from last year's run, for example, made its way to the NLAA or in what manner the funds were spent. Given that many people and organizations volunteer and contribute to the costs of putting off the Tely 10 and given the substantial registration, one assumes that the PROFIT is quite substantial - upwards perhaps of $100,000. Perhaps this money has been used to good ends, but surely the public supporting such events have a right to know how much money was raised and how it was used. It is ironic that a newspaper that is so consistently critical of government for its freedom of information track record would be so lax in publishing information that the public would want to know.