• 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • R
    July 02, 2010 - 13:33

    That the telegram would even stoop to give this poor twerp space, which was really what he wanted, adds to the silliness of it! No wonder people think some of us Newfs are brain-dead. Get a life, you poor fool.

  • Runner
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    I finished the tely 10 on sunday, my 6th time running it. I did not finish the first time I ran it however, and I was not ashamed of that. Pushing your self so hard that you collapse and remain unconscious for an hour is beyond dumb. I agree, yes, it was quite ambitious of him, but I don't think that this article should be portraying him as a hero as it is. What he did was downright dangerous and that does not make him a good role model or any kind of hero.

  • Kelly
    July 02, 2010 - 13:32

    Way to go!! My hat is off to you! You're right, it may not have been graceful but you did it!! I love your sense of humour - the whole article made me laugh, and again, the Newfoundlander's unique sense of humour is highlighted as it seems you saw some humour in your sense of style too.

    Am glad you didn't hurt yourself, and again, I raise my glass to you - cheers!

    Kelly

  • AMd
    July 02, 2010 - 13:31

    If Steve-boy had hit his head on the curb yesterday, and paramedics could not do anything for him, wonder what some of your comments would be today? Would you be advising kids to do the same? Some of you need to run some more to clear your heads !

  • Chris
    July 02, 2010 - 13:31

    The medics aren't allowing him to anything. It's a simple matter of a patient being allowed to make a choice of his own free will. Medical personnel are not allowed to force anyone to do anything.

    But Don is right, pushing yourself to collapse is not only silly, it's dangerous.

  • Dennis
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    I don't think Don, above, actually read the story before leaving his critical comment, so it's probably best to ignore him.

    Anyway, well done Steve.
    Now where can I see that video?

  • Drew
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    Dude, that's so metal.... next year barrell roll the whole way.

  • Funky
    July 02, 2010 - 13:29

    Hi Don, I'm a former astronaut that has been to the far-away planets of Mars, Venus, Pluto, and Baie Verte.

    Making statements with no backing proof on a website does qualify me as a professional. Why? Because I say it on a website of course.

    Get a life Don, and read the story. The guy trained and admitted he didn't prepare well on the day of the race. I'm sure no other person has collapsed trying to reach a goal, or made a mistake in preparation. Applaud the guy for working hard and finishing a grueling race in tough conditions. He accomplished a tough goal. Good for him.

    Anyway, I'm off on to train for my next space adventure. Mission to Pouch Cove.

  • Frank
    July 02, 2010 - 13:29

    I would expect no less of a world-class heavy metal frontman.

  • Madonna
    July 02, 2010 - 13:29

    Yes, Steve is determined and committed. Yay, Steve. And, yes, Steve set a bad example. Hopefully everyone can learn from it. The key line in the article for me is he cant remember much after the seven-mile point. Many, many people saw Steve in very bad condition in miles eight and nine AFTER the point at which Steve could not think for himself. Steve probably learned his lesson for himself. Has anyone learned a lesson for the race organizers, support crew and fellow runners on what to do in that situation?

  • steve's friend
    July 02, 2010 - 13:27

    Steve is my friend and I think he's as stund as me ar@#e.

  • ELLE
    July 02, 2010 - 13:27

    IN RESPONSE TO DON:

    This is an example of determination at it's finest. He set a goal for himself, and he accomplished this goal which is a great example for kids. There were paramedics on site should he have needed them, and they were there to help him when he did cross the line.

    IN RESPONSE TO DENNIS:

    There is a link for the video at the top of the article. I just watched it. It's great!

    Now one last statement....Congratulations on a race well finished!

  • Frank
    July 02, 2010 - 13:27

    Or perhaps a number of people posting here could calm down and perhaps approach this rare occurrence with a sense of humour. MAVIS: looks like many people posting here know Steve well - do you? The rest of you would be happy if the guy had finished the silly race in a hearse - that's an awful thing to say. You should be ashamed of yourself.

  • Mavis
    July 02, 2010 - 13:27

    I agree with Don. This is a very bad example for kids. The rest of you would be happy if the guy had finished the silly race in a hearse but those with brains know better.

  • Bobby
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    Sheavy Rule

  • Susan
    July 02, 2010 - 13:26

    Clear to see that Don (above) doesn't know Steve or how to run a race! I guess his body told him to stay at home. Not only should he take his own advise and Get a Life, but I would include: Get a Clue!!! Anyone who doesn't give up in what they are trying to finish is OK in my books.
    Side note: Kids run till you get tired, have a drink of water along the way! No worries.

    WAY TO GO Steve, can't wait till next year!!

  • don
    July 02, 2010 - 13:24

    Get a life. You could have killed yourself..have you ever heard of listening to your body?
    Have you ever heard of its only a game?
    People take life too serious. For kids out there don't look at this guy as someone to look up to he could have done some real damage to himself or some else.
    Here's a plan...try training for the race if not walk.

  • billybobby
    July 02, 2010 - 13:23

    Susan and dennis are right kids. Try to put yourself in hospital by pushing yourself too far. I guess susan and dennis would have been impressed if steve had permant damage from his fall.

    Like Don said listen to your body. Yes go for your goals and don't stop until you get there but don't kill yourself along the way.

  • Mike
    July 02, 2010 - 13:22

    Don, you are certainly not a runner by no means as all runners stick together so don't use that one on me. In Newfoundland we are not accustomed to hot humid weather and no matter how much training one does, if you are not training in the elements then its hard to realize that you are actually dehydrated. I ran the Chicago Marathon last year, it was 95 and sickly humid in October no less. 30,000 runners ran that race, hundreds and I mean hundreds were in the position like Steve was. The only thing that saved me was training in Texas all summer where the weather was hot and humid every day. Its a shame one can have such negative comments about an individual who did his best and was full of determination. I guess Don has no idea what it means to commit to a goal and go after it no matter what. To bad for you, but don't displace your displeasure with yourself onto someone else.

  • Leigh
    July 02, 2010 - 13:20

    i think this is a perfect example of what could happen to someone who is running their FIRST race! sounds like this guy trained, but didn't have the full scoop of what to expect on race day. great time, steve and a lesson learned, no doubt!

  • don
    July 02, 2010 - 13:18

    Thank you Mavis.
    To everyone..I am a runner and an experienced athelete who has competed nationally and internationally. I know what it takes to get to the finish line and I know how to compete. Pushing your body until it shuts down is never...I mean never the right option. You put your self at serious risk of heart failure and hitting your head when you pass out.
    Reaching your goal is a great thing. But there's a smart way to get there.
    Don

  • Mike
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    And I quote Don, you are certainly not a runner by no means as all runners stick together so don't use that one on me . I had a feeling you would give some bull story of how you are a runner and been in situations like this. To reiterate from the Medical side of things, once dehydrated and suffering Heat stroke, your body's symptoms include confusion and/or disorientation, thats why people don't sometimes think rationally under such conditions. So Don, when you ran all these international races I guess your perfect training abilities prevented you from being dehydrated and suffering heat stroke? You are an exceptional athlete I guess. You have got it all wrong my friend and if anything its inspirational to kids. They can learn that you can push yourselves hard but there are dangers and that we all need to be careful and know our limits. Its really a shame this chat form has taken a positive en lighting story and twisted it to be something negative. Hey don, I guess I won't go for my run this evening, its raining, i might slip, and brake an ankle, all while setting a bad example to my kids that running in the rain is a bad mix. I guess I'll live my live in a bubble world in fear if consequences!

  • Greg
    July 02, 2010 - 13:15

    Yeah, Don doesn't really have a good perspective on this. First off it's a race, not a game, he gave it his all commited to it, and did what needed to be done. People like you are the reason that the news is full of stories of how employers can't keep employees at the job, you kind of people have no commitment and loyalty towards what you want to do.

  • John
    July 02, 2010 - 13:14

    Guys, I think what some people are missing here is that this happens to atheletes, elite or other, quite often. The reality is that some days you have it and some days you don't. I'm not trying to make light of the issue because it sounds like it was quite serious. I'm simply saying that in sports and endurance sports in particular, sometimes your body just quits on you. To fault Steve for underpreparing or for pushing too hard is unfair. Usually, that push through pain is how we define a great performance. I say it was a great effort to be applauded.

  • Toph
    July 02, 2010 - 13:12

    Don.. Your spot on.. Now if SOMETHING DID HAPPEN to him.. The response would of been He shouldnt of pushed and pushed and pushed I guess he did the physical training but UNDERSTANDING the mental aspect.. He failed with that.

    || ~Peace is Peace~ ||

  • Craig
    July 02, 2010 - 13:12

    It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

    Theodore Roosevelt - Man in the Arena Speech given April 23, 1910

  • Donna
    July 02, 2010 - 13:11

    My kind of guy! Good job.

  • Mavis
    July 02, 2010 - 13:10

    Chris....make a choice of his own free will? So a person harming themselves is ok as long as it is his own free will, right? Frank, actually I am ashamed of people like you. Is that enough shame for your insipid self? Whether you know this guy or not makes no difference. He may be the smartest guy out there but he looks to me like a fool. It is foolish to put a race before your own health. Got it?

  • Ted
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    Don, you are spot on. This is a bad example to kids. I have no problem if a person wants to do foolish things. But why are the medical people allowing him to harm his body.....because the cameras are there and the mob wants him to crawl? Sad. Winning is great but not at ANY cost. Not if you harm others or yourself. There is enough foolishness in the world without our kids seeing this. The rest of you need to grow up.

  • Shane
    July 02, 2010 - 13:08

    That behaviour is only acceptable in ironman competitions. Do more training next year. No one wants to see a fatality in the Tely 10.

  • k8
    July 02, 2010 - 13:08

    way to put a negative spin on what could have been a inspirational story.

    i went to the tely 10 web site and the youngest group running i came across was age 20 -25, clearly NOT kids so stop trying to make this out as a bad example, for the children


    Steve did his very best! congratulations on finishing!!!

    also, he would NOT be better suited for George Street at 3 am!! that's a terrible comparison.
    ~k8

  • R
    July 01, 2010 - 20:22

    That the telegram would even stoop to give this poor twerp space, which was really what he wanted, adds to the silliness of it! No wonder people think some of us Newfs are brain-dead. Get a life, you poor fool.

  • Runner
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    I finished the tely 10 on sunday, my 6th time running it. I did not finish the first time I ran it however, and I was not ashamed of that. Pushing your self so hard that you collapse and remain unconscious for an hour is beyond dumb. I agree, yes, it was quite ambitious of him, but I don't think that this article should be portraying him as a hero as it is. What he did was downright dangerous and that does not make him a good role model or any kind of hero.

  • Kelly
    July 01, 2010 - 20:21

    Way to go!! My hat is off to you! You're right, it may not have been graceful but you did it!! I love your sense of humour - the whole article made me laugh, and again, the Newfoundlander's unique sense of humour is highlighted as it seems you saw some humour in your sense of style too.

    Am glad you didn't hurt yourself, and again, I raise my glass to you - cheers!

    Kelly

  • AMd
    July 01, 2010 - 20:20

    If Steve-boy had hit his head on the curb yesterday, and paramedics could not do anything for him, wonder what some of your comments would be today? Would you be advising kids to do the same? Some of you need to run some more to clear your heads !

  • Chris
    July 01, 2010 - 20:19

    The medics aren't allowing him to anything. It's a simple matter of a patient being allowed to make a choice of his own free will. Medical personnel are not allowed to force anyone to do anything.

    But Don is right, pushing yourself to collapse is not only silly, it's dangerous.

  • Dennis
    July 01, 2010 - 20:18

    I don't think Don, above, actually read the story before leaving his critical comment, so it's probably best to ignore him.

    Anyway, well done Steve.
    Now where can I see that video?

  • Drew
    July 01, 2010 - 20:18

    Dude, that's so metal.... next year barrell roll the whole way.

  • Funky
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    Hi Don, I'm a former astronaut that has been to the far-away planets of Mars, Venus, Pluto, and Baie Verte.

    Making statements with no backing proof on a website does qualify me as a professional. Why? Because I say it on a website of course.

    Get a life Don, and read the story. The guy trained and admitted he didn't prepare well on the day of the race. I'm sure no other person has collapsed trying to reach a goal, or made a mistake in preparation. Applaud the guy for working hard and finishing a grueling race in tough conditions. He accomplished a tough goal. Good for him.

    Anyway, I'm off on to train for my next space adventure. Mission to Pouch Cove.

  • Madonna
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    Yes, Steve is determined and committed. Yay, Steve. And, yes, Steve set a bad example. Hopefully everyone can learn from it. The key line in the article for me is he cant remember much after the seven-mile point. Many, many people saw Steve in very bad condition in miles eight and nine AFTER the point at which Steve could not think for himself. Steve probably learned his lesson for himself. Has anyone learned a lesson for the race organizers, support crew and fellow runners on what to do in that situation?

  • Frank
    July 01, 2010 - 20:17

    I would expect no less of a world-class heavy metal frontman.

  • steve's friend
    July 01, 2010 - 20:15

    Steve is my friend and I think he's as stund as me ar@#e.

  • ELLE
    July 01, 2010 - 20:15

    IN RESPONSE TO DON:

    This is an example of determination at it's finest. He set a goal for himself, and he accomplished this goal which is a great example for kids. There were paramedics on site should he have needed them, and they were there to help him when he did cross the line.

    IN RESPONSE TO DENNIS:

    There is a link for the video at the top of the article. I just watched it. It's great!

    Now one last statement....Congratulations on a race well finished!

  • Frank
    July 01, 2010 - 20:15

    Or perhaps a number of people posting here could calm down and perhaps approach this rare occurrence with a sense of humour. MAVIS: looks like many people posting here know Steve well - do you? The rest of you would be happy if the guy had finished the silly race in a hearse - that's an awful thing to say. You should be ashamed of yourself.

  • Mavis
    July 01, 2010 - 20:14

    I agree with Don. This is a very bad example for kids. The rest of you would be happy if the guy had finished the silly race in a hearse but those with brains know better.

  • Bobby
    July 01, 2010 - 20:13

    Sheavy Rule

  • Susan
    July 01, 2010 - 20:13

    Clear to see that Don (above) doesn't know Steve or how to run a race! I guess his body told him to stay at home. Not only should he take his own advise and Get a Life, but I would include: Get a Clue!!! Anyone who doesn't give up in what they are trying to finish is OK in my books.
    Side note: Kids run till you get tired, have a drink of water along the way! No worries.

    WAY TO GO Steve, can't wait till next year!!

  • don
    July 01, 2010 - 20:09

    Get a life. You could have killed yourself..have you ever heard of listening to your body?
    Have you ever heard of its only a game?
    People take life too serious. For kids out there don't look at this guy as someone to look up to he could have done some real damage to himself or some else.
    Here's a plan...try training for the race if not walk.

  • billybobby
    July 01, 2010 - 20:08

    Susan and dennis are right kids. Try to put yourself in hospital by pushing yourself too far. I guess susan and dennis would have been impressed if steve had permant damage from his fall.

    Like Don said listen to your body. Yes go for your goals and don't stop until you get there but don't kill yourself along the way.

  • Mike
    July 01, 2010 - 20:07

    Don, you are certainly not a runner by no means as all runners stick together so don't use that one on me. In Newfoundland we are not accustomed to hot humid weather and no matter how much training one does, if you are not training in the elements then its hard to realize that you are actually dehydrated. I ran the Chicago Marathon last year, it was 95 and sickly humid in October no less. 30,000 runners ran that race, hundreds and I mean hundreds were in the position like Steve was. The only thing that saved me was training in Texas all summer where the weather was hot and humid every day. Its a shame one can have such negative comments about an individual who did his best and was full of determination. I guess Don has no idea what it means to commit to a goal and go after it no matter what. To bad for you, but don't displace your displeasure with yourself onto someone else.

  • Leigh
    July 01, 2010 - 20:02

    i think this is a perfect example of what could happen to someone who is running their FIRST race! sounds like this guy trained, but didn't have the full scoop of what to expect on race day. great time, steve and a lesson learned, no doubt!

  • don
    July 01, 2010 - 19:59

    Thank you Mavis.
    To everyone..I am a runner and an experienced athelete who has competed nationally and internationally. I know what it takes to get to the finish line and I know how to compete. Pushing your body until it shuts down is never...I mean never the right option. You put your self at serious risk of heart failure and hitting your head when you pass out.
    Reaching your goal is a great thing. But there's a smart way to get there.
    Don

  • Mike
    July 01, 2010 - 19:55

    And I quote Don, you are certainly not a runner by no means as all runners stick together so don't use that one on me . I had a feeling you would give some bull story of how you are a runner and been in situations like this. To reiterate from the Medical side of things, once dehydrated and suffering Heat stroke, your body's symptoms include confusion and/or disorientation, thats why people don't sometimes think rationally under such conditions. So Don, when you ran all these international races I guess your perfect training abilities prevented you from being dehydrated and suffering heat stroke? You are an exceptional athlete I guess. You have got it all wrong my friend and if anything its inspirational to kids. They can learn that you can push yourselves hard but there are dangers and that we all need to be careful and know our limits. Its really a shame this chat form has taken a positive en lighting story and twisted it to be something negative. Hey don, I guess I won't go for my run this evening, its raining, i might slip, and brake an ankle, all while setting a bad example to my kids that running in the rain is a bad mix. I guess I'll live my live in a bubble world in fear if consequences!

  • Greg
    July 01, 2010 - 19:55

    Yeah, Don doesn't really have a good perspective on this. First off it's a race, not a game, he gave it his all commited to it, and did what needed to be done. People like you are the reason that the news is full of stories of how employers can't keep employees at the job, you kind of people have no commitment and loyalty towards what you want to do.

  • John
    July 01, 2010 - 19:53

    Guys, I think what some people are missing here is that this happens to atheletes, elite or other, quite often. The reality is that some days you have it and some days you don't. I'm not trying to make light of the issue because it sounds like it was quite serious. I'm simply saying that in sports and endurance sports in particular, sometimes your body just quits on you. To fault Steve for underpreparing or for pushing too hard is unfair. Usually, that push through pain is how we define a great performance. I say it was a great effort to be applauded.

  • Toph
    July 01, 2010 - 19:50

    Don.. Your spot on.. Now if SOMETHING DID HAPPEN to him.. The response would of been He shouldnt of pushed and pushed and pushed I guess he did the physical training but UNDERSTANDING the mental aspect.. He failed with that.

    || ~Peace is Peace~ ||

  • Craig
    July 01, 2010 - 19:49

    It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

    Theodore Roosevelt - Man in the Arena Speech given April 23, 1910

  • Donna
    July 01, 2010 - 19:47

    My kind of guy! Good job.

  • Mavis
    July 01, 2010 - 19:46

    Chris....make a choice of his own free will? So a person harming themselves is ok as long as it is his own free will, right? Frank, actually I am ashamed of people like you. Is that enough shame for your insipid self? Whether you know this guy or not makes no difference. He may be the smartest guy out there but he looks to me like a fool. It is foolish to put a race before your own health. Got it?

  • Ted
    July 01, 2010 - 19:44

    Don, you are spot on. This is a bad example to kids. I have no problem if a person wants to do foolish things. But why are the medical people allowing him to harm his body.....because the cameras are there and the mob wants him to crawl? Sad. Winning is great but not at ANY cost. Not if you harm others or yourself. There is enough foolishness in the world without our kids seeing this. The rest of you need to grow up.

  • Shane
    July 01, 2010 - 19:43

    That behaviour is only acceptable in ironman competitions. Do more training next year. No one wants to see a fatality in the Tely 10.

  • k8
    July 01, 2010 - 19:43

    way to put a negative spin on what could have been a inspirational story.

    i went to the tely 10 web site and the youngest group running i came across was age 20 -25, clearly NOT kids so stop trying to make this out as a bad example, for the children


    Steve did his very best! congratulations on finishing!!!

    also, he would NOT be better suited for George Street at 3 am!! that's a terrible comparison.
    ~k8