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  • far from home
    July 02, 2010 - 13:30

    I have questioned this myself, long before I began running the Tely I often wondered the same thing and questioned many friends who also run the race and no one knew the answer. I would be very interested in finding this out as well. Especially seeing how through sponsorship and volunteering many costs are indeed covered one would think. Can anyone shed some light on this? NLAA??

  • runner-up
    July 02, 2010 - 13:09

    Good article Jason but I have a question.
    My family has long been a fan of mini-marathons like the Tely 10. We have run in numerous runs in various parts of the country and in the U.S. When we moved to Newfoundland several years ago, we were enthused about running in the Tely 10. As is my habit however, I posed the question as to who is the principal beneficiary of the monies raised from such events. Usually this information is readily available - along with a list of the charities or not-for-profits and the proceeds from each event. Not so with the Tely 10. My enquiries of the race organizers met with generalities at best and a none-of-your-business reply at worst. Now I notice that the Tely 10 website makes a fleeting reference to profits being used for NLAA programs (which is more than was posted when I made my initial enquiries). But upon checking their website or, indeed, the Telegram website I see no information as to how much money from last year's run, for example, made its way to the NLAA or in what manner the funds were spent. Given that many people and organizations volunteer and contribute to the costs of putting off the Tely 10 and given the substantial registration, one assumes that the PROFIT is quite substantial - upwards perhaps of $100,000. Perhaps this money has been used to good ends, but surely the public supporting such events have a right to know how much money was raised and how it was used. It is ironic that a newspaper that is so consistently critical of government for its freedom of information track record would be so lax in publishing information that the public would want to know.

  • far from home
    July 01, 2010 - 20:18

    I have questioned this myself, long before I began running the Tely I often wondered the same thing and questioned many friends who also run the race and no one knew the answer. I would be very interested in finding this out as well. Especially seeing how through sponsorship and volunteering many costs are indeed covered one would think. Can anyone shed some light on this? NLAA??

  • runner-up
    July 01, 2010 - 19:45

    Good article Jason but I have a question.
    My family has long been a fan of mini-marathons like the Tely 10. We have run in numerous runs in various parts of the country and in the U.S. When we moved to Newfoundland several years ago, we were enthused about running in the Tely 10. As is my habit however, I posed the question as to who is the principal beneficiary of the monies raised from such events. Usually this information is readily available - along with a list of the charities or not-for-profits and the proceeds from each event. Not so with the Tely 10. My enquiries of the race organizers met with generalities at best and a none-of-your-business reply at worst. Now I notice that the Tely 10 website makes a fleeting reference to profits being used for NLAA programs (which is more than was posted when I made my initial enquiries). But upon checking their website or, indeed, the Telegram website I see no information as to how much money from last year's run, for example, made its way to the NLAA or in what manner the funds were spent. Given that many people and organizations volunteer and contribute to the costs of putting off the Tely 10 and given the substantial registration, one assumes that the PROFIT is quite substantial - upwards perhaps of $100,000. Perhaps this money has been used to good ends, but surely the public supporting such events have a right to know how much money was raised and how it was used. It is ironic that a newspaper that is so consistently critical of government for its freedom of information track record would be so lax in publishing information that the public would want to know.