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Lettuce goes local


How often have you, your friends and relatives commented on the quality of produce in this province’s grocery outlets?

Because of the geographical reality of being located in the North Atlantic and requiring ships and long tractor trailer rides to get produce to the shelves of our stores, many times the freshness aspect of produce has been lost.

Enter a company from Atlantic Canada to the rescue.

GoodLeaf Farms of Truro, N.S., has been using new indoor vertical farming technology from to produce fresher, local produce year-round, going from seed to plate in just over three weeks.

The company announced Wednesday, it is partnering with Loblaw Companies Ltd., to use its technology to help ensure consumers in Newfoundland and Labrador get the freshest local produce possible on their tables.

“We know our customers are looking for exceptional produce, grown locally wherever possible, which is why we are such huge supporters of local and regional suppliers,” Mark Boudreau, Director, Corporate Affairs, Loblaw Companies Ltd. Said in a news release Wednesday.

“Having fresh local vegetables year round in Newfoundland would have been impossible a decade ago. We’re excited about today’s launch, and proud of our role working with TruLeaf over the past few years to bring this innovative farming technology to our Dominion customers.”

These products are grown in tightly-controlled environments to the very highest standards in the industry and once harvested are turned around quickly to ensure the most absolute freshness possible for consumers.

Technology created by its parent company TruLeaf Sustainable Agriculture Ltd., GoodLeaf  uses an indoor, vertical farming system that uses LED lights and reclaimed rainwater to grow ultra-fresh produce in as little as three weeks, pesticide free.

Built with the highest degree of sustainability in mind, the process uses up to 90 per cent less water than traditional farming methods and can be harvested, packaged and available for sale on Newfoundland shelves within a matter of days.

“By dramatically reducing the time and energy needed to transport produce, it really is a new way to eat responsibly,” Gregg Curwin, president and CEO, GoodLeaf Farms said in a news release.

Because of the geographical reality of being located in the North Atlantic and requiring ships and long tractor trailer rides to get produce to the shelves of our stores, many times the freshness aspect of produce has been lost.

Enter a company from Atlantic Canada to the rescue.

GoodLeaf Farms of Truro, N.S., has been using new indoor vertical farming technology from to produce fresher, local produce year-round, going from seed to plate in just over three weeks.

The company announced Wednesday, it is partnering with Loblaw Companies Ltd., to use its technology to help ensure consumers in Newfoundland and Labrador get the freshest local produce possible on their tables.

“We know our customers are looking for exceptional produce, grown locally wherever possible, which is why we are such huge supporters of local and regional suppliers,” Mark Boudreau, Director, Corporate Affairs, Loblaw Companies Ltd. Said in a news release Wednesday.

“Having fresh local vegetables year round in Newfoundland would have been impossible a decade ago. We’re excited about today’s launch, and proud of our role working with TruLeaf over the past few years to bring this innovative farming technology to our Dominion customers.”

These products are grown in tightly-controlled environments to the very highest standards in the industry and once harvested are turned around quickly to ensure the most absolute freshness possible for consumers.

Technology created by its parent company TruLeaf Sustainable Agriculture Ltd., GoodLeaf  uses an indoor, vertical farming system that uses LED lights and reclaimed rainwater to grow ultra-fresh produce in as little as three weeks, pesticide free.

Built with the highest degree of sustainability in mind, the process uses up to 90 per cent less water than traditional farming methods and can be harvested, packaged and available for sale on Newfoundland shelves within a matter of days.

“By dramatically reducing the time and energy needed to transport produce, it really is a new way to eat responsibly,” Gregg Curwin, president and CEO, GoodLeaf Farms said in a news release.

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