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Tearing down the tattoo taboo


With a marker running along his upper arm, not far from a skin-and-ink memorial to the beginnings of his small business, Adam Noseworthy considered whether he had ever been prejudged by anyone, based on his tattoos.

“Some people are taken aback by it,” he said this week, standing on the top floor of Trouble Bound Studio in St. John’s. “Most people these days take it seriously and don’t really judge you by it.”

SLIDESHOW

It was years ago that Noseworthy got his first — one that includes a banner with the incorporation date of his company: 2010.

“Most tattoos are still very easily concealed,” said Trouble Bound’s owner Dave Munro, working the marker. “They can very easily be put away or tucked away and it doesn’t affect your professional life. Which, at one point in time, you dealt with a number of different occupations where it was a mitigator.”

RELATED:

As more workers get inked, some companies are easing the rules around visible tattoos

Advocacy in ink

 

In Newfoundland and Labrador, some employers still maintain strict policies around visible tattoos. But regardless of positions taken, or body art chosen, Munro said, he believes skilled people today will be given the recognition they deserve in the end.

“(Talent) will always be a strong­er, more objective force in the long run.”

Munro’s upper-floor workroom held bookcases with titles such as “Gothic Architecture” and “Japanese Art of the Edo Period.” More plentiful were the pages of concept drawings for customers — dozens of pages plastering pin boards.

“Those are tattoos that are being done. Those are drawings that are finished and waiting to get done. Those are drawings that need to get done,” he said, throwing a hand at a trio of points around the room.

There is no such thing as wandering in drunk to his studio for a quickie tribute, just to be clear.

Keeping the wait time to a minimum has been the challenge for Munro and his staff, given the popularizing of tattooing through reality shows.

Along with the TV stories, tattoo shops as a whole have opened up over the years, he said, becoming less of a closed-off environment, bringing in new customers while contributing to the end of tattoo taboos.

“As for it being accepted, it never went through my head,” said Kristy George, a communications and advocacy specialist with the St. John’s Board of Trade.

From behind her desk, on the third floor of an office building on Harvey Road, she passed a hand over her left forearm, where her new tattoo is visible when she wears short or rolled sleeves.

The tattoo — her second — is a copy of the signature of her father, Alfred Wilson, who died in June 2014.

George had it completed just after Christmas, at Phoenix Tattoo in Mount Pearl.

“I just wanted something to remind me of how much he loved us,” she said, passing her hand over an “XXX OOO” her father had once written on a private note.

Her new tattoo has been spotted and commented on by board members with, she said, the comments being entirely positive.

“It’s a form of expression and I would hope that employers today judge their employees by their performance and what they bring to a business,” she said.

“Some people are taken aback by it,” he said this week, standing on the top floor of Trouble Bound Studio in St. John’s. “Most people these days take it seriously and don’t really judge you by it.”

SLIDESHOW

It was years ago that Noseworthy got his first — one that includes a banner with the incorporation date of his company: 2010.

“Most tattoos are still very easily concealed,” said Trouble Bound’s owner Dave Munro, working the marker. “They can very easily be put away or tucked away and it doesn’t affect your professional life. Which, at one point in time, you dealt with a number of different occupations where it was a mitigator.”

RELATED:

As more workers get inked, some companies are easing the rules around visible tattoos

Advocacy in ink

 

In Newfoundland and Labrador, some employers still maintain strict policies around visible tattoos. But regardless of positions taken, or body art chosen, Munro said, he believes skilled people today will be given the recognition they deserve in the end.

“(Talent) will always be a strong­er, more objective force in the long run.”

Munro’s upper-floor workroom held bookcases with titles such as “Gothic Architecture” and “Japanese Art of the Edo Period.” More plentiful were the pages of concept drawings for customers — dozens of pages plastering pin boards.

“Those are tattoos that are being done. Those are drawings that are finished and waiting to get done. Those are drawings that need to get done,” he said, throwing a hand at a trio of points around the room.

There is no such thing as wandering in drunk to his studio for a quickie tribute, just to be clear.

Keeping the wait time to a minimum has been the challenge for Munro and his staff, given the popularizing of tattooing through reality shows.

Along with the TV stories, tattoo shops as a whole have opened up over the years, he said, becoming less of a closed-off environment, bringing in new customers while contributing to the end of tattoo taboos.

“As for it being accepted, it never went through my head,” said Kristy George, a communications and advocacy specialist with the St. John’s Board of Trade.

From behind her desk, on the third floor of an office building on Harvey Road, she passed a hand over her left forearm, where her new tattoo is visible when she wears short or rolled sleeves.

The tattoo — her second — is a copy of the signature of her father, Alfred Wilson, who died in June 2014.

George had it completed just after Christmas, at Phoenix Tattoo in Mount Pearl.

“I just wanted something to remind me of how much he loved us,” she said, passing her hand over an “XXX OOO” her father had once written on a private note.

Her new tattoo has been spotted and commented on by board members with, she said, the comments being entirely positive.

“It’s a form of expression and I would hope that employers today judge their employees by their performance and what they bring to a business,” she said.

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